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I inherited an old pressure cooker from a friend, but it seems to be missing a part. I locked it down and boiled some water in it. red arrow is where a part is missing I think

So it looks like they had some tape or something over the red arrow valve. The green arrow valve never popped up, and I was unable to get any psi on the gauge. Once the water came to a boil, a vent of steam (and a bit of water) came out of the red arrow valve.

Can anyone tell me the name of the part that is needed at the red arrow?

Thanks.

I don't have the reputation to comment on your answer. Thanks for the help. The only indication of model or type is "LISTED 409A" on the bottom of the vessel. I'll be sure to get the proper pressure regulator.

Second edit. Actually found the model number. 0178107. 26091G3

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It's good that the "green arrow valve" never popped up; that's the safety fuse, and only "pops" (destructively, and probably spraying food onto the ceiling) when the cooker pressure goes way too high.

The missing part is the pressure regulator, gauge or counterweight. The pressure cooker won't work without it. It blocks steam coming out of the vent until the steam pressure gets high enough to push the regulator up off the vent, thus limiting the internal pressure.

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These are usually pretty easy to replace, as they are easy to lose.

It's important to get the right one, to use the wrong one could be very dangerous!

Your cooker is made by Presto. Presto calls that part a pressure regulator, as well as I can tell: http://www.pressurecooker-outlet.com/Presto-Pressure-Cooker-Parts.htm

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    "It's important to get the right one, to use the wrong one could be very dangerous." please mark that up, bears repeating! – rackandboneman Dec 8 '16 at 10:09
  • If available for your model, the "3-peice" weight/regulator is a nice upgrade - 5, 10 or 15 PSI rather than 15 PSI only, but it depends what you are using it for/how you are using it (ie, for canning, 15 PSI is what you want.) You might also want to get a replacement for any/all rubber parts/seals while you are at it, as they don't live forever. – Ecnerwal Dec 8 '16 at 17:28
  • @Daniel Griscom, thanks for the great edit! – Jolenealaska Dec 10 '16 at 1:50

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