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Does the baking/cooking process change the nutritional value of food? I don't know the science behind that.

I want to calculate more than just calories -fat, carbs, sugars, protein, etc... Is it just as simple (albeit, time consuming) as adding up those values on the ingredients? Or is there more to it than that?

marked as duplicate by GdD, rumtscho Jan 9 '17 at 11:19

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  • It's all just an estimate anyways. I can't imagine baking changes enough to matter provided you don't burn off a significant amount of the bread. – Catija Jan 9 '17 at 2:32
  • Yep - only thing that should be lost in baking is water, and water is 0 anything and 0% anything :) – rackandboneman Jan 9 '17 at 9:32
  • Questions on nutrition are off topic on this site. – GdD Jan 9 '17 at 10:47
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    @GdD actually the tag "nutrient-composition" exists because the nutritional value is an exception of the "no nutrition" rule. – rumtscho Jan 9 '17 at 11:19
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    Hello @TheSmallestOne Thank you for editing, it seems indeed that I picked a wrong duplicate target. We also have cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/42664 and cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/24147, and cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/40286, so in its current form, it would be a duplicate of one of those. Is there something different you needed? If yes, please edit it so we can also see the difference to them. – rumtscho Jan 9 '17 at 18:58