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I occasionally come across recipes that call for rice vinegar, but don't specify which of the many varieties they mean.

Is there a "standard" or implied type of rice vinegar that should be used when a recipe simply calls for rice vinegar? Or is it assumed that the chef will be familiar with the flavor profiles of the dish they are trying to make and will be able to choose an appropriate rice vinegar by their own knowledge and discretion?

Some examples: http://www.lecremedelacrumb.com/slow-cooker-general-tsos-chicken/ http://onadimeandoutoftime.com/sweet-and-sour-chicken/ http://www.iwashyoudry.com/2015/07/27/asian-chicken-lettuce-wrap-spring-rolls/ https://food52.com/recipes/3869-chinese-roast-pork http://carlsbadcravings.com/asian-sweet-chili-sesame-chicken/ http://www.howsweeteats.com/2012/06/thai-crunch-chicken-salad/

I only have white rice vinegar and dark rice vinegar (Chinkiang vinegar)

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All of your example recipes seem to be written from a Western POV. That being the case, all of those recipes seem to be calling for white or light, unseasoned rice vinegar, not Chinkiang AKA Chinese black vinegar. Someone writing a recipe for an American or British audience would not expect you to even know what Chinkiang is, and would ask for it specifically if it were expected.

The other type of rice vinegar that you might commonly see in a bottle on a typical Western shelf is one seasoned with sugar and salt, most particularly for use on rice for making sushi rice. These recipes are not asking for that either, just use your regular white rice vinegar.

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