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I'd like to cook rice in my steamer, if possible. It comes with instructions for a bunch of food types, but doesn't mention anything for rice.

The bottom of the steamer looks like this: bottom compartment

I also have two of these to put on top of the previous compartment: middle and top compartment

I usually get boil-in-bag rice and cook the rice in a pot on the stove, so I'm not really sure how to cook the rice with a steamer.

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It is probably best if you pre-soak the rice before cooking. How long you soak it for will depend strongly on the type of rice and your ambient temperature. Try an hour to begin with. Thai glutinous rice is traditionally steamed rather than boiled. Use a porous container for the rice so that excess water or condensates could drain out and not make the rice soggy. As a hack, you can wrap the pre-soak rice in a towel and put the bundle in the steamer, just be prepared to lose a fair amount to the towel deal with the sticky mess on it afterwards.

  • I use Thai rice, didn't know it's traditionally steamed. (I tried to add a specific tag to my question, in addition to rice, but couldn't find any.) – Stijn May 10 '17 at 16:29
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    Yes, often steamed in an elongated woven bamboo basket. Thai glutinous rice is very different from Thai long grain or "fragrant" rice though. With normal non-glutinous types, they cook them normally, boiled until all the water is evaporated. I am very curious about whether the same technique works for dried pasta! – user110084 May 10 '17 at 16:34
  • Thai glutinous rice != Thai jasmine rice. – rackandboneman May 10 '17 at 18:53
  • @rackandboneman they are different, jasmine rice aka fragrant rice is long grain fluffy type, non-glutinous for sure. Glutinous rice is sometimes called sticky rice. Most glutinous rice are short grain, but Thai sticky rice comes in long grain variety too which makes it confusing. – user110084 May 10 '17 at 19:15

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