3

My homemade Taiyaki always turn out wrong in texture: They are soft and chewy both on the inside as well as the crust. While inner texture is right — fluffy, chewy and soft, with molten Anko, the crust is not like at street-stalls in Japan: Crunchy, crisp and thin.

I’m using one of these cheap Aluminum Non-Stick Taiyaki-pans, and tried various batters and heating regimes: Neither the amounts of Milk (if used), Egg, Baking-Soda, nor whether to bake hot-and-fast or cool-and-slow seems to get them crisp.

How can one achieve the authentic texture even with home Taiyaki-making equipment? And — is a crispy, crunchy outer crust even authentic — or were the ones i ate in Japan maybe bad examples of how a Taiyaki should be?

4
  • What's your specific technique? – ChefAndy Sep 1 '17 at 13:14
  • 1
    Currently I’m preheating the pan — i haven’t measured, but i had it so that the dough wouldn’t even sizzle, and also oil-smoking-hot — then I’ll coat with oil (tried little and tons…) and add one of my measuring spoons of dough, coating tail and fin as well as body. In there I’ll drop 1 big tsp of Anko or to substitute Nutella (while experimenting it’s cheaper), covering the filling afterwards completely with new dough. Then I’ll close the pan, and cook each side for ~1:30-1:45 over almost highest heat on my stove. They pop out, and shape is great. They’re evenly cooked but not crispy outside. – NebuK Sep 2 '17 at 16:17
  • Any non-stick pan is unlikely to ever get you the texture you want. – user50726 Sep 2 '17 at 18:29
  • Have you tried giving it a crust of some sort? Flour the outside? – LastMike036 Apr 18 '18 at 2:58
1

They are supposed to be cripsy. I would give it a quick toast in the toaster oven or turn on the boiler for a moment. Usually the tai yaki pan is cast iron so it's a lot hotter.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.