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Got to work this morning and made the first round of drinks and everything was fine with them. We then made the second round about an hour later with the same milk, same kettle, same instant coffee and tea bags. It all tasted fine but in the bottom of some of the cups after we had finished were some spherical white lumps.

This happened in both the coffee and the tea so it appears it was caused from the milk. What are these lumps?

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    same milk, same kettle: could have been the kettle? When the forensics guys get here, they're going to ask you to describe the lumps. Size? Odor? ... If hard and crunchy (?) - it could have been scale from the bottom of the kettle, especially if you used a lot of the water for the first round, and poured the bottom dregs from the kettle into the second round ... just an idea. – Lorel C. Sep 19 '17 at 13:33
  • @LorelC. No it wasn't limescale and it definitely looked like it was from the milk. They were probably 3-5mm in diameter, I didn't smell them and looked soft and squidgy. I read a theory that they could have been proteins from the milk but I don't know how true that is. – TheLethalCooker Sep 19 '17 at 13:38
  • Apparently when the milk was poured down the sink there was some of these balls in it though I didn't see it myself so I'm not 100% on that. – TheLethalCooker Sep 19 '17 at 16:12
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    Where was the milk between the first and the second round? – Stephie Sep 19 '17 at 19:55
  • @Stephie In the fridge, I think it was shop bought that day though, again not 100% on that though. – TheLethalCooker Sep 20 '17 at 8:05
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I would suspect that these lumps are milk protein coagulating, sometimes these little lumps are unavoidable. I also suspect that this means your milk was 'on the verge or going,' and I would suggest that you either use a pure silver pitcher to keep your milk from growing bacteria or you can drop a pure silver item into your milk. Silver will prevent bacteria from multiplying(silver works especially well if you are going to leave your milk at room temperature for any period of time.) Good Luck

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