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When I get a green tea latte from Starbucks, the drink is uniformly mixed from top to bottom, no matter how long it takes me to drink it.

I prefer to make my matcha lattes at home, though, because its faster, cheaper, and better (both health and taste, as I prefer my lattes far less sweet than Starbucks makes them and I prefer to sweeten with honey) than running through the drive through every morning. However, every morning, no matter how fast I drink my morning beverage, I wind up with a layer of green sludge at the bottom of my cup.

From what I can tell, the matcha is falling out of solution with the rest of the drink, despite being thoroughly mixed to start out. I do wonder if it has something with the amount of sugar, or the use of water to dissolve the matcha in. But since the whole thing comes together and tastes wonderful (until the last bit), I'm not sure. The only way around it I've found so far is to stir the drink well before every sip, which is unnecessary with coffee house versions (as I've had them other places and do not recall winding up with sludge at the end of the drink) and annoying while I'm at work.

Why do my matcha lattes end in green sludge, and how can I fix it? The green sludge at the end is bitter, thick, and unpleasant to drink, so I want to make my latte more like the ones from a coffee shop.

Recipe and method:

3/4 - 1 cup milk (depending on mug size), heated

1 slightly heaping teaspoon matcha powder

1 - 2 teaspoons honey

~1/8 cup hot water (a minute or two off the boil)

Force matcha through a sieve into mug to remove lumps, add hot water. Blend (using electric whisk/milk frother) until dissolved. Add honey, blend again to dissolve. Froth milk, then add to mug. Blend to mix milk and tea/honey mixture. Drink.

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    I don't know (thus not an answer) but I'd guess the coffee house has a bucket of sludge somewhere - but is making your drink off the part of the bucket above the sludge. You could do the same - just pour off what does not stay dissolved/mixed. – Ecnerwal Oct 19 '17 at 17:42
  • @Ecnerwal I suppose I could, but that would require waiting for the drink to settle-- as I said, there's sludge when I'm finished, but not when I first make the drink. I don't think a coffee house waits for it to settle to pour off the drink before serving the customer, either. – senschen Oct 19 '17 at 19:06
  • Are they putting powder in your cup (their blender) at the shop, or pouring off a jug of premixed? – Ecnerwal Oct 19 '17 at 19:12
  • @Ecnerwal I drink them hot, so straight into the cup AFAIK (or possibly into a milk frother pitcher-- if that's the case, it might have something to do with it... a combination of better frothing from the steam wand mixing the milk and powder together and pouring the drink into a cup). Definitely not pouring off from a jug. – senschen Oct 19 '17 at 19:54
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If you are making your drink with real matcha, that matcha is very finely ground green tea leaves. There are parts of the tea leaves that will always be insoluble in water, and therefore eventually fall to the bottom and create this sludge to which you are referring. The only solutions to that issue would be either 1) filtering the solution to remove the insoluble solids or 2) allowing the insoluble solids to settle to the bottom and the decanting the beverage above that sludge into another container. Straining is not enough when you are dealing with very fine particles, as the openings in strainers would just allow those particles to pass right through.

If, however, you are not using real matcha and it is completely water soluble (maybe a freeze-dried preparation from brewed tea) there will be no sludge. I would suspect that Starbucks is not brewing green tea with real matcha for every serving.

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    I am definitely using real matcha, and so is Starbucks ("Milk, Matcha Tea Blend [Sugar, Ground Japanese Green Tea]" according to the ingredients list in the link above). Matcha isn't really brewed, in that it is dissolved and then immediately ready for consumption instead of being steeped for a period of time first, but I would still say Starbucks is definitely "brewing green tea with real matcha for every serving." – senschen Oct 20 '17 at 11:08
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Use the milk frother but skip many of your steps (warm water unnecessary for example). First add the milk (oat milk works even better!) and turn on the frother, then, while the frother is on, add matcha powder gradually but make sure to finish a few seconds before the frother stops. If the powder has been exposed to moisture and is a bit clumpy you want to run it through a small sieve as you add it to the frother. I never add sweeteners so do not know when to add (perhaps try making one without sweetener to see if that helps), but I would do that after I have added the matcha to ensure the matcha is as well integrated as possible. I never have sludge except when I have clumpy matcha and no sieve. Most frothers have a cold whisk function you can use in case you did not finish all steps before the frother shuts off.

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