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What protease in particular does avocado contain? I've been searching everywhere for it on the internet and still couldn't find any answers.

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    Is your interest biological, or does the question relate to cooking somehow? As written this is probably off-topic for the site. – logophobe Mar 30 '18 at 18:22
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    @logophobe actually, proteases in fruit have culinary aspects, so the question is fine. – rumtscho Mar 30 '18 at 19:50
  • From what I can find, the protease is cysteine, a thiol protease. While they are generally known to have meat tenderizing properties from some fruits such as pineapple of papaya, like @Sobachatina I can't find any reference to the use of avocado. – Cindy Mar 30 '18 at 20:01
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    @Cindy Cysteine by itself is an amino acid. "Cysteine proteases", though, are a general class of proteases identical to "thiol proteases" (because the active portion of the enzyme is the thiol bit of a cysteine amino acid). All cells contain cysteine proteases, as they're used for general housekeeping, but normally at such low levels that they don't have a culinary impact. – R.M. Mar 30 '18 at 22:36
  • @ZohaibHafiz If you're wondering about the browning of avocados, that's not a protease, but a different enzyme. – R.M. Mar 30 '18 at 22:37
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The culinary impact of proteases are to tenderize meat and that, if uncooked, they will prevent gelatin from setting.

I have not heard of, and was unable to find, any recipe using avocados for meat tenderization. I was easily able to find many recipes that use fresh avocado with gelatin.

Therefore, I don't believe avocados contain any proteases that are of culinary concern.

  • As further evidence, this paper showed that avocado juice had no detectable gelatinolytic activity at pH 5.6. – canadianer Mar 31 '18 at 0:03

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