2

I made a chocolate cake and recipe calls for buttermilk and oil which makes the batter liquidy,but when I bake it, they turn out rubbery or they become very dense and when I press it feels like soft boiled chocolate paste like texture and also they crack on top, it only happens with the runny batter recipes and thick batter recipe cakes are perfect and super fluffy,what could be the problem?

  • Edit your post to include an example of a recipe that didn't work out for you. – Sneftel Jul 15 '18 at 8:51
  • 1
    How long did you mix it, and how long did the batter rest before you baked it? Overdoing either one will develop gluten and could explain the 'rubbery' problem. Using a higher protein flour than what the recipe writer used can cause the problem, too. – Joe Jul 15 '18 at 9:24
  • 1
    unvented oven? Wrong (eg single vs double acting baking powder, baking powder vs baking soda, carbonated vs plain water), defective (eg stale baking soda), or mishandled (eg added at the wrong time) raising agent? misunderstood and omitted recipe step or ingredient (eg an acidic ingredient that works with baking soda, an aeration technique)? – rackandboneman Jul 16 '18 at 0:18
  • i just mixed dry and wet ingredients separately and then folded them together until everything is incorporated – KEERTHI keetu Jul 17 '18 at 14:47
1

I bake a lot with gluten free (I cater for a wheat allergy) and as a direct result a lot of my batters are runny but I still get a fluffy final cake. Bread doughs are more like batter than bread too.

You mention folding in the comments, which prompts me to wonder if you're making a red velvet cake, given the recipe points mentioned.

If that is the case, you need to aerate the egg whites separately, and fold them in last, taking care as to not lose the air you put in.

If you edit your post to include the recipe that would help with diagnosis a lot more.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.