3

I made salsa last night and this morning all jars didn't seal.
Can I just put new lids on them and put them back in hot water bath?

4

Per Joe, the answer about jam jars that didn't seal applies to you as well.

Given that the salsa has now sat out all night unrefrigerated, it would not be safe to re-do the canning process. If you had checked them immediately, you could probably have used new lids, cleaned the rims of the jars, and hot-water-bathed them again. But not after 8-12 hours at room temperature. If they have very high acidity (PH less than 4.0) they might be fine, but why take a chance?

Instead, I suggest putting those jars in the fridge and eating them yourself within the next few days, checking them for bubbles that indicate that the salsa is going off.

  • I find your answer internally inconsistent. Why should they be unsafe for re-sterilizing but not for eating within a couple of days? Also, you actually disagree with the answer about jams, because it states that "Canning "rule-of-thumb" is that things can be reprocessed/eaten/refrigerated within 24 hours of the processing and considered safe." – JohnEye Jul 27 '18 at 10:54
  • Because if you're re-canning them, then you're planning to keep them for a long period at room temperature, not just a couple days in the fridge. – FuzzyChef Jul 31 '18 at 19:57
  • You're right about the Jams answer though, I'd missed the 24 hour bit – FuzzyChef Jul 31 '18 at 20:03
1

A significant aspect of what you accomplish by boiling the jars the length of time you do (1 HR +, if my memory serves me correctly) is cooking as well as sterilizing the contents. While you could clean, reheat, etc and get the jars to seal, I would think the consistency of the salsa after being cooked twice would be more like tomato paste and less like salsa.

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