I tried to cook croissants following a recipe. The whole process went smoothly, there was no butter melted and the yeast was still active. But when I proof the laminated dough, they wouldn't rise. I prove them in the fridge overnight because of the hot weather (The average room temperature reached 30°C.), but I found that the butter became solid and I think that's why the dough didn't rise. I've made some research and I found that a lot of people proof their laminated in the fridge successfully. What should I do now?

  • Possible duplicate of Temperature controlled work surface? – Luciano Aug 9 at 16:37
  • Wait, what? Your fridge is 30C? Can you please adjust your narrative of what you did for greater clarity? – FuzzyChef Aug 11 at 2:54
  • @Luciano it does not look like a duplicate of that question to me. – FuzzyChef Aug 11 at 2:55
  • Have you tried proofing them at room temp? 30C is a good temp for proofing. Proofing overnight in fridge allows for greater flavour development in breads (or any yeasted dough), but they still need to be proofed further at room temp before bake. Croissants I have never seen proofed in the fridge - not saying it can't be done, but I've never seen it. – soup4life Aug 13 at 0:41
  • @FuzzyChef I believe the answer to the duplicate will solve the same problem asked in this question – Luciano Aug 13 at 13:31

30C is a good temp for proofing. Proofing overnight in fridge allows for greater flavour development in breads (or any yeasted dough), but they still need to be proofed further at room temp before bake. Croissants I have never seen proofed in the fridge - not saying it can't be done, but I've never seen it. The only time you should be truly concerned about a hot kitchen (in my opinion) is when you're working with chocolate. Because breads and yeasted things rise best between 27C and 38C with the optimum temperature being 35C. Check out this link for more info http://www.theartisan.net/dough_fermentation_and_temperature.htm

Good Luck! Croissants are a labour, but a delicious one!

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