Eggs are commonly used as a binder in meatballs and other foods.

If separated, is one part of the egg a stronger binder:

  • Is the white a stronger binder than the yolk?
  • Is the yolk stronger than the white?
  • Is either separated portion a stronger binder than the whole egg?
  • I'm sure there's a difference, I'm trying to find the science before adding an answer – Luciano Sep 14 at 9:16
  • 1
    Depending on the answers you get, I might be interested in a follow-up question about the resulting texture (I sometimes make savoury oat/cheese/egg flapjacks and they can turn out a little rubbery with too much egg, but much less and they fall apart) +1 – Chris H Sep 14 at 9:34

Further research using Google has provided the information I was seeking though not in the form I had posed my question. It might be helpful if I first state what I'm ultimately trying to achieve:

  • I want to make chicken nuggets using only chicken thigh meat (and possibly chicken skin).

On my previous attempt, I used whole egg as a binder and achieved less than satisfactory results: over here I found a recipe mentioning that using the egg white, which has much more protein than the yolk (mostly fat), would give me the best shot at succeeding:

Lean Poultry Patties:

  • Unlike beef, ground turkey and chicken, either alone or in combination, benefit from the addition of egg whites when forming burger patties.
  • The egg whites help the lean meat to bind together, especially if you're using additional ingredients such as chopped vegetables.
  • To form patties made with ground poultry, use a food processor to chop vegetables such as onion, pepper or mushrooms into small pieces.
  • Use one egg white per 1 pound of meat.
  • A tablespoon of savory flavoring to the meat mixture, such as soy sauce or barbecue sauce, adds body and moisture

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