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My recipe calls for 1 tablespoon of flour, how much xanthan gum should I use?

closed as unclear what you're asking by Ward, rumtscho Dec 17 '18 at 11:59

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  • How much volume does the final dough(?) have? Xanthan gum does horrible things when used to excess. – Wayfaring Stranger Dec 16 '18 at 17:38
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    It would likely help to include your recipe, and what the flour is there for. (I'm assuming thickening, but it's just a guess!) – Erica Dec 16 '18 at 19:33
  • Erica is right, without a recipe, we don't have a chance to start making suggestions. If you edit the recipe in, you can flag your own question for reopening. – rumtscho Dec 17 '18 at 12:00
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Xanthan is not necessarily a substitute for flour. We would need to know what your recipe is to give you the best answer. Xanthan increases viscosity when at rest, but thins when stirred (shear thinning). It is most often used to stabilize emulsions. It also reduces syneresis (the weeping of liquid from gels or purees. It can be used as a binder in gluten free recipes. There are a range of concentrations depending on the desired effect, but they generally don't go over 1.5% of the weight of the total recipe.

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