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I have had chicken curry katsu at different restaurants in different countries, and there is always a diced bright red ingredient, the color of a tomato, put on like a garnish. Some told me it was a red pepper, others a variety of carrot. I could not ascertain the flavor from eating a small bit of just that.

bowl of curry rice from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Curry_rice_by_Hyougushi_in_Kyoto.jpg

This picture seems to have it hiding in the back behind the rice, and I always have seen it served in a pile in the corner, although I often have seen it chopped into smaller bits.

Does anyone know what ingredient is used? Is that intended as a garnish not to be eaten?

2 Answers 2

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This appears to be a Japanese pickle mixture, made with daikon radish amount other things, called Fukujinzuke (福神漬)

Fukujinzuke is a mixture of Japanese radish (daikon), lotus root, cucumber and eggplant which are preserved in a soya sauce and sweet cooking wine (mirin) base. The sweet brown or red relish is served as a garnish to Japanese curry (kare raisu).

Source: https://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2349.html

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The spice and color are in the title...

...curry.

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    "Curry" is not a spice. (There is a "curry tree", but it's not what you're thinking.) It's also not a bright red vegetable.
    – Sneftel
    Nov 9, 2021 at 10:52
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    Welcome! Please take the tour and browse through the help center to learn more about how the site works. I sense the impulse to engage in a discussion in your posts, but this is a Q/A site with a rather strict format, unlike the standard web forums you may be familiar with z
    – Stephie
    Nov 9, 2021 at 12:41
  • This does not provide an answer to the question. Once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post; instead, provide answers that don't require clarification from the asker. - From Review
    – Robert
    Nov 10, 2021 at 22:06

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