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Questions about naming and translation of culinary terms and phrases.

14
votes
1answer
271 views

What other English names are there for dried grapes?

In the US we refer to basically all dried grapes as raisins. In cooking shows in the UK I hear them refer to sultanas. I've also read that dried currants are really dried grapes, not actually the ...
2
votes
2answers
146 views

Are the terms self-rising flour and baking powder different in the US and UK?

I made Mary Berry’s Cherry cake, which called for 275 g of self-rising flour and 2 tsp of baking powder, in an 8-inch pan. Went all over the oven. Are these ingredients different in the US?
12
votes
2answers
2k views

Why do we use the term Quick “Bread”?

I know there are questions here already about Quick bread vs cake, or muffins vs cupcakes. But I'm not asking about the sugar, fat ratio thing. I'm more interested in the "bread" part of it. To me ...
0
votes
0answers
121 views

What is 'charcoal dressing'?

I've read the following dish description in a 'Poolside BBQ Menu': Green salad with charcoal dressing all results I've come across on Google are non-culinary. Is it just a sauce cooked on ...
5
votes
3answers
3k views

What is a 'parmigiano pearl'?

I've read the following dish description in a wedding buffet menu: Truffle essence potato soup with parmigiano pearl I can't seem to find any relevant results using Google Search.
22
votes
2answers
4k views

What does it mean that a pan is “anti jamming”?

Lots of shops call their food pans "anti-jamming", but I have not been able to find out what that means. I don't think it's related to radio communication or making fruit jam :) Here is an example:
4
votes
2answers
290 views

What does 'white' alone mean in cocktail recipes?

I've come across the two following cocktail recipes: East Meets West Absolut Raspberry vodka, Cointreau, St-Germain elderflower liqueur, pomegranate juice, lime juice, white The English ...
0
votes
0answers
64 views

What are 'Coffer' and 'cloudy cream'?

I've come across the following description: Coffer French toast with stewed berries and cloudy cream my guess for 'coffer' is that it's 'coffee' misspelled - just need to make sure. as for '...
1
vote
0answers
152 views

Is there such a thing as 'onion hair'?

I've been reading a food menu of a Qatari hotel, and I've come across the following dish description: Roasted stuffed quails (3) with golden onion hair and green pepper Naturally, searching Google,...
3
votes
1answer
127 views

Is sour cream in olde recipes the same as sour cream today? [duplicate]

I have a really old cookbook (about 1890) that calls for soured cream or sour cream in some recipes. Is this the same as the stuff you get in a tub at the store or is it like sour milk where you put ...
6
votes
3answers
263 views

What does it mean when a chef says a dish is a “rustic” dish eg. a “rustic pot roast”

I've been watching some cooking videos and frequently the chef would say that something he cooked was a "rustic" dish eg. "rustic pot roast"? What does rustic mean?
-3
votes
1answer
164 views

What is milk classified as once you pour it on cereal?

I recently came across an image posing the question of whether milk would be properly classified as a beverage, broth, or sauce once it's poured on a bowl of cereal. I'm not sure if it's any of those ...
4
votes
1answer
279 views

What is the place called where cheese is aged?

When cheddar cheese is made, it is kept on shelves in a climate controlled place and each wheel is turned over once per week. What is the place called where the cheese is kept during this aging ...
3
votes
2answers
157 views

If a recipe calls for 'ready-prepared potato wedges', what exactly does that mean

Does it mean the frozen potato wedges you can find in supermarkets, or does it mean fresh potatoes that I've cut into wedges (if so, does that include/exclude the skin, or is that optional?)
10
votes
3answers
378 views

English term to describe “kompot”, an Eastern European beverage made from berries

I am trying to find an English word for a special drink. This is the recipe: 5 liters of water 1 cup of sugar 500 grams of berries Mix sugar and water, bring mixture to a boil. Add berries, bring ...
3
votes
1answer
78 views

What do you call the flavor imparted from cooking at high heat?

I'm wondering about that high-heat flavor you get just before outright burning food. Charred, grilled, blackened, smoky, or seared flavor? Wok hei? I'm not exactly sure what to call it. Or would the ...
8
votes
1answer
281 views

“elven slices” - What is the real name (if any)?

In the video game "Sacred" (2004), the player can find recipes. They are usually written in a fantasy-like manner. In the German version I found a recipe called "Elfische Schnitten aus Tyr-Hadar" ("...
25
votes
5answers
6k views

Is there a word for the flavour shared by onion, spring onion, shallot, leek, and chive?

Among the flavours of onions, spring onions, shallots, leeks, and chives there is one that they share. Is there a name for it?
13
votes
4answers
2k views

10 cent package

I am converting my mother's recipes in a book for our family. The recipe calls for a 10 cent package of instant potatoes and biscuit mix. does anyone have any idea of what that would equal out to be. ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

Is there a name for the taste coming from alkaline food?

I know "acidic food" is described as "sour" but what do we call food that is "alkaline"?
2
votes
0answers
61 views

Correct term for marinating+degorging/macerating at the same time?

Sometimes it makes sense to marinate fruit or vegetables with water-extracting ingredients (sugar,salt,alcohol...) and flavorings (spices or extracts) at the same time, and later use fruit and liquid ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

How much is a “splash”

I've run into several recipes which asked for a "splash of" water, soy sauce, etc. How much is a "splash"? I assume if it's something more concrete like 1/4 cup, they would have said so. Since it's ...
1
vote
2answers
98 views

Is there a term for the blending of different recipies of the same type?

One of the things I do when cooking is I look at several different recipes for the same dish. I take a "base" recipe "A" and add these ingredients from recipe "B" and maybe even a unique ingredient ...
4
votes
1answer
156 views

What is 1/4 ст кукурузного крахмала in english?

I'm trying to make a green tea tart but the recipe is in Russian. Google keeps translating it to '1/4 v cornstarch ' but I have no idea what measurement 'v' would be?
5
votes
1answer
658 views

What is “reconstituted” milk?

Here in Chile nearly all milk you can buy in supermarkets is UHT milk in tetra bricks. Some brands state on the carton that the milk is "reconstituted", while others state that it is "not ...
8
votes
1answer
252 views

Can a fish living in fresh water be called seafood?

Pangasius (Wikipedia) says: Pangasius is a genus of medium-large to very large shark catfishes native to fresh water in South and Southeast Asia. ... In 2011, Pangasius was sixth in ...
5
votes
3answers
974 views

How to “toss to coat” ingredients in a sheet pan?

I've been trying new recipes lately, and I often see instructions along the lines of: Put ingredients in sheet pan Drizzle oil over ingredients Add seasonings to ingredients Toss to coat I ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

What does “heat the oven to broil” mean?

This recipe states: Heat the oven to broil and arrange a rack in the middle. Then later: Broil the salmon on the baking sheet ... about 10 to 12 minutes. I don't understand what this means. ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

A different name for Manitoba flour?

I'm currently in Greece, I'm trying to find some Manitoba flour but it seems nobody here have ever even heard the name. And I asked in bakeries and restaurants, too, just to be sure to find it. What ...
5
votes
2answers
658 views

What is the term for 'sunny side up' omelette?

I have a technique when cooking omlettes where you only cook them on one side, and gather up the edges - but let the cheese accumulate in the soft centre. Friends have suggested several names for ...
6
votes
2answers
5k views

Difference between saucepan, frying pan and skillet

What, if anything, is difference between a saucepan, frying pan and skillet? I am heating up some frozen vegetables and the directions said to boil 1/4 in a saucepan. This doesn't really work as 1/4 ...
6
votes
3answers
5k views

What is queso (the sauce/dip)? Is it short for Chile con Queso?

Queso is the Spanish word for cheese but (in the US) it is often used to refer to a cheese-based dip or sauce for tortilla chips. When I google "what is queso?", Google says "short for chile con ...
13
votes
1answer
29k views

Difference between burritos, chimichanga, and enchiladas?

What is the difference between burritos, enchiladas, and chimichangas?
29
votes
5answers
8k views

What should I use for old recipes that call for 'buttermilk'?

Old-school buttermilk is the milk left after churning butter and is not today's 'cultured buttermilk'. A recent answer to the question about what to use for 'sweet milk' mentions : Buttermilk was ...
8
votes
2answers
737 views

Burger without patty?

So I ordered a hamburger at a new restaurant and they brought me the burger but without a patty, with two slices of square salami in it. When I asked them where the patty was, they said I should've ...
56
votes
5answers
19k views

Why isn't Almond Milk (and other non-animal based 'milk') considered juice?

As per the title, I consider "Milk" to be the substance secreted by living being to sustain their young, whether they be human, cow, dog, etc... Almonds do not produce milk to sustain their young, in ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

What does it mean for a menu to be a “set menu”?

I hope this question isn't too off topic. What does it mean for a restaurant to have a "set menu"? The one I have in mine has three headings wit the descriptions: "starters...assortment as brought to ...
0
votes
3answers
949 views

Name of Vegetarian that Eats Insects

There are different type of vegetarians, such as Lacto ovo vegetarian, Lacto vegatarian, and Vegan. Some cultures eat insects, which may violate the naming of these rules. I'm curious if there is a ...
3
votes
2answers
97 views

Smoothie - water as base liquid, originally?

I am wondering, for termbase purposes, about the base liquid for smoothies: is it originally water? I would appreciate your help as native English speakers, as we were considering equivalents in our ...
2
votes
2answers
773 views

Does the definition of “cooking” imply heat?

Through comments posted in this question, I'd like to expand the commentary on the definition of cooking. Specifically, is heat an essential stipulation? According to the wiki article on cooking: ...
3
votes
1answer
3k views

What type of flour is “wheat flour” in the UK? [duplicate]

I want to replicate an American recipe of Banana Chocolate Chip Muffins. It requires 1 cup of wheat flour. What type of flour would that be in the UK shops?
4
votes
3answers
174 views

Need translation of dish into English

I am trying to find for a descent equivalent for the Spanish "sartén de la abuela" or "sartén de los montes". That is, I want to know the name of the dish, how you order it from a menu, not the ...
35
votes
10answers
28k views

What's (really) the difference between fruit and vegetables?

I was wondering what's (really) the difference between fruit and vegetables. Obviously I can name different fruits and vegetables, but if you ask me what's really the distinguishing factor, I wouldn't ...
1
vote
2answers
86 views

Is “krapfens” commonly used to designate donuts?

"Krapfen" is a German word which means "donuts". I wonder if the term "krapfens" is commonly used in English to refer to donuts or if it may be pretty odd. I have such doubt because it sounds similar ...
11
votes
7answers
2k views

Unambiguously referring to “spiciness”

Anyone who likes (or hates) spicy food has been in the situation: You're at a restaurant, your mother-in-law is preparing dinner, or you're preparing dinner for your best friend, and the question ...
1
vote
1answer
109 views

What are the characteristics required for a liquid be considered milk?

I know that the liquid from animal (cow, etc) are considered milk. But how do you know feature a liquid to appoint as milk? There's the vegetable liquids (soy, nuts, ...) which are also considered ...
-2
votes
1answer
108 views

Pumpkin carpaccio: correct use of the name

IN my view, carpaccio is thinly sliced beef, nothing else. But now, it seem OK to serve salmon carpaccio, or even, as I recently saw, pumpkin carpaccio. Am I to assume that everything thinly sliced ...
2
votes
1answer
531 views

What part of the brisket is sold in UK?

I'm looking at this recipe from Gordon Ramsay's Ultimate Home Cooking, pg. 198: Barbecue-Style Slow-Roasted Beef Brisket 1kg beef brisket, excess fat trimmed off to leave just 1 cm 2 onions, peeled ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Cobbler vs pie?

How is a Southern U.S. style "peach cobbler" different from "peach pie"? It seems to use pie crust rather than buscuit dough, and it's a woven top, not cobblestones. I'll bet if I put the same ...
2
votes
2answers
80 views

Culinary term for non-flavor defining ingredients

In a strongly flavoured soup/stew, curry, or sauce, or salad, you sometimes add other ingredients (eg mixed vegetables) that do not strongly influence the flavor of the end result, but are chosen for ...