Questions tagged [language]

Questions about naming and translation of culinary terms and phrases.

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What is the distinction between baking and roasting?

Both baking and roasting refer to cooking things in the oven. The only foodstuff I am aware of that can be either baked or roasted is potatoes, and the distinction is that roast potatoes are cooked ...
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  • 233
-1 votes
1 answer
125 views

What's the difference between omelette/frittata/quiche?

What is the culinary difference between these dishes? It seems to me that they are all egg dishes that are cooked with some fillings in them (onion/tomato/ham/cheese etc). Is quiche just a frittata in ...
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4 votes
1 answer
564 views

Beating eggs for brownie

This brownie recipe (from this book) calls for eggs, beaten. I'm not entirely familiar with US recipes. What does it mean that the eggs have to be beaten? Is it sufficient to do this lightly with a ...
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1 vote
1 answer
212 views

Do French/International chefs really use/talk about Fahrenheit instead of Celsius degrees?

Example: https://youtu.be/lVcTvHTn6Dw?t=325 This chef is very French, yet he talks about Fahrenheit. In France, which is in Europe, surely they use Celsius? He seems to "think" in American ...
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1 vote
3 answers
288 views

Category name for restaurants NOT dressing food?

Is it there a specific category name or whatever, defining restaurants that serve food without dressing, or any kind of food art or dish decoration, despite still serving good quality, tasty food, ...
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1 vote
2 answers
171 views

What are the tables called where food is delivered for service to dinner?

In formal dining rooms there is often a long table set to the side and the servers use it to stage dishes before they are served to the table. What is that appurtenance called?
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3 votes
1 answer
479 views

What is "compression" as a cooking technique?

I've recently stumbled on Masterchef professionals as an American, and it's very impressive! Many chefs serve "compressed" vegetables and fruits (e.g. tomatoes, pears, cucumber, mango, etc.)....
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0 votes
0 answers
37 views

Is broth and stock the same thing? [duplicate]

I see some recipes calling for chicken broth and some call for chicken stock. I suspect that they are the same but cannot really say for sure. Is there a difference or is it a case of American vs ...
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29 votes
5 answers
5k views

What is "layering flavors"? What does it accomplish and how do I do it?

Recently I've been into cooking videos and tutorials and something that stands out to me is this concept of "layering flavors" that some chefs use when they add ingredients. Example: We're ...
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  • 393
12 votes
5 answers
3k views

What kind of yeast is this?

I have a type of yeast that I'm finding hard to identify by English standard. These are picture of it: Whole, uncut. cut in half In my country, Bulgaria, we call it "live" yeast, despite ...
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6 votes
2 answers
514 views

What is a “small cup” in Australia and/or old recipes?

In older or Australian recipes, is “small cup” a specific (if not quite standardized) measurement? If so, what, approximately, is that measurement? I’m going to be making a recipe from an Australian ...
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1 vote
3 answers
134 views

Are heavy-bottom stock pots called something else?

I would quite like to get hold of a large stock pot with a thick base so I can make things like preserves as well, but whenever I look at kitchenware in my local shops (I'm in NZ if that makes a ...
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2 votes
1 answer
200 views

Is sour milk, soured milk, and milk that has gone sour, all the exact same thing?

Is sour milk, soured milk, and milk that has gone sour, all the exact same thing? Related to this question: Is buttermilk another term for sour milk or some part of sour milk? and especially this ...
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4 votes
1 answer
646 views

What's the 'opposite' of mise en place?

Mise en place definition for those unaware. Mise en place (French pronunciation: ​[mi zɑ̃ ˈplas]) is a French culinary phrase which means "putting in place" or "everything in its place&...
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16 votes
3 answers
2k views

What is a refrigerator tray in older recipes?

Many older cookbooks call for filling a “refrigerator tray”. For example, in the 1960 Better Homes and Gardens Dessert Cook Book the recipe for “Banana Ice Cream” says to “Pour into refrigerator trays....
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1 vote
1 answer
451 views

Do blini have to be thin?

In case you're wondering, Blin (or Блин) is just Pancake in Russian. It was given by my favorite YouTuber that these pancakes have to be thin to be a proper blin. Is this true?
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2 votes
2 answers
226 views

Simmering, rather than caramelizing, onions (plus garlic and ginger)

I can caramelize onions, garlic, and ginger over 30 minutes, stir frying. But this requires me to stand in front of the stove for 30 minutes. Instead, I prefer to spend 90 minutes, adding a bit of ...
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2 votes
3 answers
684 views

What is a stem pan?

I have a vintage cookbook, from Charlotte, North Carolina and about 1958, that has a recipe for “Different Applesauce Cake”. It says to “Cook in stem pan approximately 1 hour, 10 minutes”. Searches ...
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4 votes
1 answer
158 views

What does it mean for a dish to be called poêlé?

I was watching a show and they mentioned Fois Gras Poêlé. Now I know what fois gras is so I looked up what poêlé meant since I assumed it was a cooking technique. However, Google (patent pending) ...
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4 votes
2 answers
390 views

Is there an English word for the Spanish pepper called Ñora?

Is there an English word for the Spanish pepper called Ñora? I have translated the following from Wikipedia The ñora is a cultivated variety of Capsicum annuum or pepper, called "bola" in ...
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4 votes
3 answers
2k views

Recipe word for "not trimmed"

I'm trying to write up a recipe by weight and include both the "cleaned" weight and the "uncleaned" weight. I can't find a good word for "uncleaned" and I'm hoping ...
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1 vote
2 answers
130 views

Choosing between semolina and non-semolina durum flour

I have a big confusion between flours, aggravated by the fact that I do not live in an english-speaking country and labeling and translations are confusing. I like fresh pasta and have experimented ...
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0 votes
2 answers
436 views

What's the difference between thin crust pizza and a cracker

My friend says that thin pizza crust is nothing but a cracker, but I think there are significant differences between the two products. For example, if you buy a store-bought cracker and add pizza ...
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3 votes
4 answers
985 views

Is a pizza like this unheard of in the USA?

My idea of a pizza, bought from a pizzeria in Sweden (at least growing up and when I last did, which was a few years ago now), is as follows: A standard pizza dough is grabbed and turned into a flat ...
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1 vote
2 answers
501 views

What is the difference between "water/drink enhancers" and cordial?

I was doing a bit of internet browsing today, and I came across this image (linked rather than embedded because of copyright), which shows a bottle of hand disinfectant along with three bottles ...
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2 votes
2 answers
2k views

"tomato sauce" vs. "tomato paste" [duplicate]

amazon returns almost 50 hits for "tomato sauce" and just 3 for "tomato paste" Do "tomato sauce" and "tomato paste" mean the same thing?
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5 votes
1 answer
731 views

What does it mean to let gluten relax?

I'm new to cooking and have no experience cooking. I know a bit about gluten in that it gives bread the toughness for stretching, which is good for chewy bread and bad for soft cakes. I've watched ...
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3 votes
1 answer
421 views

What's 香茜 or 芫荽 in English?

Many Hong Kong Cuisine restaurants use 香茜 or 芫荽 in soup dishes. Please see the picture below. Are 香茜 or 芫荽 the same species of plant? What's the correct English translation? I'm hankering to buy ...
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2 votes
2 answers
175 views

What is the correct term for this method of cooking?

I'm a reluctant cook at the best of times but I'm interested to know what I just did. I got a massive bone for the dog from the butcher. There was quite a lot of meat on it so I thought the dog and I ...
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4 votes
3 answers
758 views

What does resting mean

I'm a little confused with what resting actually means. I've typically seen this term being used where you move food (typically meat) from the oven/grill/heat and then keep it warm for "some time" (...
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2 votes
1 answer
332 views

A “puck” of frozen food

I found a recipe that calls for 5 “pucks” of frozen spinach. I cannot find a definition of the term. I need to know how many ounces are in a puck?
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3 votes
3 answers
348 views

Flavor of wasabi, horseradish, mustard, capers, and jalapeño

What is the name of the flavor of wasabi, horseradish, mustard, capers, and jalapeño? Unfortunately, I'm not fond of the taste of the above ingredients. To me, they taste similar. I don't mind the ...
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3 votes
1 answer
181 views

What are the different parts of a zester called?

Earlier I was trying to describe which part of a zester to use and realized I have no idea what the different parts are called. I fell back on google, and was surprised to find nothing, there are ...
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15 votes
2 answers
4k views

What's the process of making black garlic called?

it's not caramelized – it doesn't get hot enough. it's not fermented – the process is enzymatic, not due to fungus, yeast, or bacteria. it's not pickled – no acid brine is added it's not curing – no ...
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4 votes
3 answers
306 views

Name for a master "cook plan" that describes how you prepare and serve all courses of a meal

I'm writing some software and could use some help (from some experts!) naming something. In cooking, culinary arts, etc. I have to imagine that there exists a concept where you, the chef, have a ...
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4 votes
4 answers
1k views

What would "Disintegrant", "Ammonium", or the units of measure "glass" or "gl" mean in a non-American book?

Just purchased a baking cookbook online which, while written in English, is clearly from a country outside of the U.S. Units are metric, which is fine, but there a couple of terms with which I am ...
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1 vote
1 answer
196 views

Are "shelled nuts" with or without their shells?

I'm using MyFitnessPal to log what I'm eating, and I can't figure out whether 'shelled pistachios' are pistachios with or without their shells.
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1 vote
4 answers
565 views

Common term for "roughly-grind Semolina" (as used to make couscous)

A course common in all North-African coast cuisines is Couscous, which is made of "roughly-grind Semolina" lightly cooked or steamed with a bit of water and salt; Very often, a vegetable based stew is ...
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11 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is Irish buttermilk different from Estonian buttermilk?

I'm Irish but living in Estonia. Just now, I decided to make some soda bread which I have made a couple of times before. I bought some "pett", which Google translate and a professional chef told me is ...
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8 votes
3 answers
3k views

What does "Massage with salt" mean in a recipe?

I want to try this recipe for Vegan Lox by Tasty. Step 5 is Use a vegetable peeler to shave the carrots lengthwise into ribbons. Massage with salt. I don't understand what "Massage with salt" ...
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1 vote
1 answer
107 views

Interpreting recipes from a different culture (specifically India) [closed]

I've tried to make dahi (indian "curd", or yogurt) a few times, but it has always turned out more like cottage cheese (English "curds and whey") than like yogurt. This isn't necessarily bad (the whey ...
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0 votes
2 answers
281 views

What is the difference between connective tissue and suet/fat deposits?

A google image on the term 'meat connective tissue' seems to show what I believe to be fat deposits/suet in the case of meat pictures. So what then is the difference between fat deposits and ...
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  • 3,757
6 votes
2 answers
686 views

What's a pan and what's a pot?

In Dutch, we have just one word for pots and pans, which happens to be "pan", so I was surprised to learn about the word "pot". I learned that pans are for frying, which is why they are shallow and ...
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12 votes
1 answer
3k views

What's the difference between a deep fryer and a chip pan?

As described in the Wikipedia article, a chip pan is a pan that contains oil for frying. The oil is heated to a high temperature, and then usually a metal basket is lowered into the pan for frying of ...
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3 votes
1 answer
416 views

What is the English name of these sea snails?

What is the English name of sea snails sold in Vietnam that the Vietnamese labelled as Ốc bông & Ốc tỏi (Vietnamese)? Ốc bông Ốc tỏi
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6 votes
2 answers
2k views

What is the term for "plain" non-flavored ice cream

Me (russian) talked to my partner (american) about ice cream flavors. In Russia and post-USSR plain flavor (creamy-milky one) is extremely popular and often called пломбир. It is the default flavor, ...
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0 votes
1 answer
94 views

As it relates to the Hospitality Industry what is a par level of product?

What does this mean in the Hospitality industry? As in the Hospitality Department will establish par levels of products Is this kind of like when your boss in IT tells you that there should always ...
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  • 309
17 votes
1 answer
4k views

What does "lightly crushed" mean for cardamon pods?

I am currently attempting to make the “Fragrant Spiced Rice Pudding” on page 136 of “Gordon Ramsay’s Home Cooking.” I am a novice with cooking so forgive me if my question is common sense for those ...
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14 votes
4 answers
12k views

What makes cake a Sponge Cake? And what doesn't?

I've been watching the Great British baking show and they refer to basically every cake as a sponge. I live in the USA and grew up in Australia. We just called cake, cake. I know how to make a ...
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  • 141
16 votes
6 answers
7k views

Is eggnog just a milkshake?

Last year I tried eggnog for the first time, following a homemade recipe involving egg, cream and sugar. The result tasted like a thin vanilla ice-cream milkshake (with spices and alcohol). Recipes ...
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