Questions tagged [language]

Questions about naming and translation of culinary terms and phrases.

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1 answer
666 views

Is there a distinction between fleur de sel and sel de Guérande?

On a recent trip to Paris, I wanted to buy some fleur de sel as a gift, but I found nothing that was specifically noted as such. Instead, I found sel de Guérande, which largely seems like the same ...
8 votes
4 answers
2k views

Hash Brown Terminology

If I order fried eggs for breakfast at a restaurant/diner, there's a pretty standard lexicon to communicate quickly how I want them done-- sunny side up, over easy, over well, etc. Even if I mess up ...
9 votes
4 answers
11k views

What is the term for the "amuse-bouche" at the end of the meal?

At several restaurants I've been to, in addition to serving an amuse-bouche at the beginning of a meal, there is an equivalent complementary small desert served at the end, sometimes before or after ...
10 votes
8 answers
33k views

Is there a difference between Stew and Casserole?

Is there a proper distinction between a slow cooked meat dish labelled a casserole and one labelled stew? And if there is a traditional distinction would it be fair to say that the distinction is no ...
210 votes
7 answers
83k views

Translating cooking terms between US / UK / AU / CA / NZ

This post is an attempt to keep track of the terms that differ between dialects of English or exist in some dialects but not others: British (UK) / Australian (AU) / Canadian (CA) / American (US) / ...
39 votes
2 answers
6k views

What does "do." mean in old recipes?

I'm reading through a book of cocktails from 1865 and I often seen the measurement for a given ingredient listed as "do.". What does this mean? Examples: 40 1/2 ounces of roast and ground cocoa. ...
6 votes
3 answers
58k views

What is the difference between a Jus, Sauce and a Gravy?

I've just booked my Christmas meal. This included Sausage, mashed potatoes and an Onion Jus. Why Jus and not Gravy? Begs the question, What is the difference between a Jus, Sauce and a Gravy?
7 votes
1 answer
3k views

What does it mean for a liquid to "crack"?

I'm looking at a recipe for condensed milk, and a couple of the steps say the following: Do not stir once the mix starts to simmer otherwise it can crack and crystalize. if there are sugary bits ...
13 votes
2 answers
2k views

What is the meaning of the term whole grain?

Often I have read that whole grains are healthy. So, what is a whole grain and what is a non-whole grain? The Pasta I have says "Durum wheat" as the ingredient. What should I understand by that?
0 votes
1 answer
207 views

What do you call the result of passing through a sieve?

Writing down an instruction to add the 'passed ingredient X' to bowl Y, I found the possible referring phrases getting slightly clunky, or else unspecific like 'the result'. With tomatoes it would be ...
30 votes
6 answers
6k views

What is "layering flavors"? What does it accomplish and how do I do it?

Recently I've been into cooking videos and tutorials and something that stands out to me is this concept of "layering flavors" that some chefs use when they add ingredients. Example: We're ...
5 votes
1 answer
1k views

What's the 'opposite' of mise en place?

Mise en place definition for those unaware. Mise en place (French pronunciation: ​[mi zɑ̃ ˈplas]) is a French culinary phrase which means "putting in place" or "everything in its place&...
1 vote
1 answer
197 views

What would (or do) you call komatsuna in English?

What if anything are these greens called in English? Likely brassica rapa perviridis.
5 votes
1 answer
455 views

Help translating an older Recipe

I have an old recipe handed down from my great great grandmother in law, for what she called brown bread. Unfortunately it has a few ingredients that I don't recognise. I did some searching on google ...
21 votes
1 answer
4k views

What international cooking terms sound similar but have different meanings?

I am not the only international user here, and I bet that others are just as confused as I am when we read something on an American-centric resource and the corresponding translation in our language ...
18 votes
3 answers
2k views

Old biscuit recipe question - "until the dough blisters"

I'm reading through some old (early 1900's) cookbooks and something that keeps coming up is beating dough "until it blisters" - here's an example. VIRGINIA BEATEN BISCUIT. One quart flour. ...
0 votes
1 answer
180 views

How many grams is one serving of great northern beans for an average adult?

I was told for my diet one serving of great northern beans, But I do not know how much that is so I bought a gram scale thinking I could measure it but I don't know how much to measure. I don't mean ...
2 votes
1 answer
491 views

Does "pastry" mean something different in cooking than in baking?

I was watching Iron Chef: Quest for an Iron Legend today. In the third episode, the theme of the competition was pastry, and the key ingredient they had to use was milk. This site's pastry tag says ...
4 votes
2 answers
8k views

What does it mean for a burger to be "a little pink"?

I ate at Red Robin's recently. Usually, I order a well-done burger because I want my burgers cooked thoroughly. But the waiter suggested that I try "a little pink" burger, which is the ...
0 votes
2 answers
260 views

What is it called when you slice meat or fish into small, thin slabs, like sashimi?

Is there a term for when meat (or fish) is sliced into thin pieces that are a mouthful each, similar to sashimi? So, in other words, if I am writing a recipe and I want to instruct the cook to cut ...
6 votes
2 answers
992 views

What is the difference between whole grain wheat and whole wheat?

I am somewhat confused on the concept of whole grain wheat vs whole wheat. The product in question is "Triscuit" biscuits. The manufacturer does not know so I thought I would put it online. ...
19 votes
1 answer
4k views

What is sortexed rice?

Here is a link to rice I want to buy. It is quoted as being polished and sortexed. I was wondering exactly that meant? Sortexed is not a word I heard before.
5 votes
1 answer
2k views

What are the vertical-edge plates called?

I'm assuming asking this question is ok since questions about kitchen equipment and cutlery are permitted. So far I've only found steel plates that have a vertical edge. Do these vertical-edged ...
10 votes
7 answers
5k views

What is this type of cookware called used for roasting and baking?

I'm looking for the English name for this cooking utensil: It can be used for roasting on top of the stove, or it can be put in the oven for slow cooking. I've stumbled upon 'roasting dish', or '...
17 votes
5 answers
6k views

What exactly are American recipes containing "smoked sausage" or "smoked Italian sausage" referring to?

I have recently come across several American recipes that call for an ingredient described as 'Smoked Sausage' or 'Smoked Italian Sausage'. Here in Australia, we try to be a little more specific, so ...
27 votes
8 answers
16k views

What are things like Bread, Rice and Cereal collectively known as?

I'm not sure if this belongs here or in the English language stack exchange but here goes: We have broad classifications like "Fruit" and "Vegetable" and "Meat"/"Protein". What do you collectively ...
6 votes
1 answer
215 views

What is the name of this indirect grill?

In Japanese, it seems to be called a Machuugrill. It is fired by charcoal and the grill arrows are just air. It seems to be some convection heating with the temperature moderated by water. Translation ...
13 votes
4 answers
2k views

what is a 10 cent package of instant potatoes and biscuit mix

I am converting my mother's recipes in a book for our family. The recipe calls for a 10 cent package of instant potatoes and biscuit mix. does anyone have any idea of what that would equal out to be. ...
10 votes
1 answer
2k views

Meaning: muffins are "blind"

The following expression was used in an old baking book, "The Modern Baker, Confectioner and Caterer" (1907) by John Kirkland: The bad results so frequently obtained are generally due to ...
7 votes
2 answers
421 views

Firm vs. crisp vs. crunchy for apples

I see these terms used to describe apples on signage at markets and I'm wondering whether they are meant to imply different things and if so what? For example, this page uses the terms "firm"...
24 votes
4 answers
6k views

What do American chefs mean by "Red pepper flakes"? [duplicate]

I see the term "Red pepper flakes" used often by American chefs, but to the European mind this term is very confusing. It could mean flaked and dried: Red chilli (e.g. Kashmiri, Birds Eye ...
4 votes
1 answer
499 views

What is the difference between castor, confectionary and icing sugar?

I see these labels used and was wondering what exactly they mean?
4 votes
2 answers
1k views

What are the dips in muffin/cupcake tins called?

When I was writing this answer I realized that I have no idea what to call the dips in muffin/cupcake tins. I used to call them cups but when I looked it up I found that the cups are the paper inserts ...
4 votes
2 answers
312 views

What is the distinction between baking and roasting?

Both baking and roasting refer to cooking things in the oven. The only foodstuff I am aware of that can be either baked or roasted is potatoes, and the distinction is that roast potatoes are cooked ...
5 votes
1 answer
2k views

What does it mean to let gluten relax?

I'm new to cooking and have no experience cooking. I know a bit about gluten in that it gives bread the toughness for stretching, which is good for chewy bread and bad for soft cakes. I've watched ...
5 votes
3 answers
773 views

What is macaroni cooked in milk called?

Is there a name for the partial dish where you simmer macaroni in milk for 30-60 minutes? It's called stuvade makaroner in Swedish:
-1 votes
1 answer
483 views

What's the difference between omelette/frittata/quiche?

What is the culinary difference between these dishes? It seems to me that they are all egg dishes that are cooked with some fillings in them (onion/tomato/ham/cheese etc). Is quiche just a frittata in ...
3 votes
3 answers
3k views

What properties allow something to be considered "milk"?

Traditionally, milk is defined as (from Merriam-Webster): 1: a white liquid produced by a woman to feed her baby or by female animals to feed their young; especially : milk from cows or goats that is ...
4 votes
1 answer
1k views

Beating eggs for brownie

This brownie recipe (from this book) calls for eggs, beaten. I'm not entirely familiar with US recipes. What does it mean that the eggs have to be beaten? Is it sufficient to do this lightly with a ...
1 vote
3 answers
303 views

Category name for restaurants NOT dressing food?

Is it there a specific category name or whatever, defining restaurants that serve food without dressing, or any kind of food art or dish decoration, despite still serving good quality, tasty food, ...
1 vote
1 answer
427 views

Do French/International chefs really use/talk about Fahrenheit instead of Celsius degrees?

Example: https://youtu.be/lVcTvHTn6Dw?t=325 This chef is very French, yet he talks about Fahrenheit. In France, which is in Europe, surely they use Celsius? He seems to "think" in American ...
1 vote
2 answers
580 views

What are the tables called where food is delivered for service to dinner?

In formal dining rooms there is often a long table set to the side and the servers use it to stage dishes before they are served to the table. What is that appurtenance called?
43 votes
9 answers
241k views

Stock vs Broth - What's the difference in usage?

I've now learned (from this site) that broth and stock are not the same product (see this great answer). So, in any given scenario, why should one use stock rather than broth, or vice versa? i.e. ...
3 votes
1 answer
2k views

What is "compression" as a cooking technique?

I've recently stumbled on Masterchef professionals as an American, and it's very impressive! Many chefs serve "compressed" vegetables and fruits (e.g. tomatoes, pears, cucumber, mango, etc.)....
7 votes
4 answers
23k views

What is Zwieback toast and where can I find it?

I am baking a black forest cake and it calls for zwieback toast. I cannot find this anywhere. Does anyone know what this is or where I can find it?
10 votes
7 answers
3k views

How many different varieties of 'pancake' are there?

I'm not talking about ingredient differences like adding blueberries or chocolate chips, or even buttermilk or cooked pumpkin to the batter ... How many fundamentally different regional types of '...
13 votes
5 answers
101k views

What's the US equivalent of double and single cream?

I can find whipping cream, half and half, and even clotted cream where I'm staying in the US but not double or single cream, are these familiar terms or is there a US equivalent term?
13 votes
2 answers
24k views

What is the difference in blanching and parboiling?

From the time I was very young and just beginning to cook, I always heard about blanching but never heard of parboiling. I learned how to blanch vegetables to prepare for freezing, removing skins from ...
16 votes
3 answers
3k views

What is a refrigerator tray in older recipes?

Many older cookbooks call for filling a “refrigerator tray”. For example, in the 1960 Better Homes and Gardens Dessert Cook Book the recipe for “Banana Ice Cream” says to “Pour into refrigerator trays....
6 votes
2 answers
1k views

What is a “small cup” in Australia and/or old recipes?

In older or Australian recipes, is “small cup” a specific (if not quite standardized) measurement? If so, what, approximately, is that measurement? I’m going to be making a recipe from an Australian ...

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