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Results tagged with Search options answers only user 1415

Questions about possible substitutions for an ingredient. Please indicate the reason for substitution.

2
votes
I would say they are quite different. Tapatio is spicier, and thicker. Frank's Red Hot is thinner, has a more vinegary flavor, and is less spicy.
answered Mar 28 by franko
6
votes
i would think the flavor would be different, but they really are similar to small, underripe (green) tomatoes. i might be worth a shot to try those in a pinch, but canned is also a good option.
answered May 26 '11 by franko
4
votes
in a pinch, i always just use the same amount in regular onion. the flavor won't be quite the same, but they are at least close.
answered Jan 26 '12 by franko
2
votes
Aquafaba! (also known as chickpea water) Here's a good recipe from Serious Eats: https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2016/03/easy-vegan-mayo-aquafaba-recipe-vegan-experience.html
answered Oct 31 '18 by franko
1
vote
my rule of thumb is about half dried for whatever it says for fresh, but Ray's answer is much more precise. : )
answered Feb 3 '11 by franko
1
vote
Maybe Maraschino liqueur? not the stuff that comes with clown nose cherries in it, but the real stuff. If your local liquor store sells kirsch, they might sell this. Luxardo is the brand I buy.
answered Oct 29 '12 by franko
2
votes
Poblanos are a good substitute, and are pretty common. any mild green pepper would probably be ok. (note: they also call anaheim peppers "new mexico", so maybe they are just labeled differently?)
answered Jun 7 '11 by franko
2
votes
Would it just be something as simple as using a non-alcohol wine? I'm not really sure if there're any that are 100% free of alcohol, but what if you boiled a non-alcohol wine to remove even more (or …
answered Sep 12 '11 by franko
0
votes
i don't know the science behind it, but even if you thoroughly blended your cottage cheese beforehand (so there's no lumps) i still would think that there would be a serious consistency and flavor dif …
answered Aug 7 '11 by franko
8
votes
horseradish is a common substitute for wasabi.
answered Aug 12 '11 by franko
10
votes
Use a vegetarian alternative! I just ran across these recently myself, and I am finding the idea really intriguing. Not sure how they compare in flavor or texture, so your mileage may vary... http://w …
answered Mar 28 '11 by franko
1
vote
can you even find the whole annatto seed? that's what makes the oil that color. i don't think it really imparts a much of a flavor. a thread at chowhound.com suggests maybe using turmeric instead to c …
answered Feb 21 '12 by franko
2
votes
not sure if it would yield the same results, but i was going to suggest maybe sorghum syrup? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorghum_syrup it seems like something that predates the introduction of comme …
answered Feb 14 '11 by franko
4
votes
parmesan cheese is, i believe, the highest concentration of umami in the food world. marmite may be the second highest. using Glutamate powder (MSG) seems easy, too. not sure how high they rate, but l …
answered Feb 18 '11 by franko
4
votes
No, I don't believe vital wheat gluten will work in this way for your recipe. When hydrated, vital wheat gluten is very sticky, and you can't roll or flatten it out very easily like you would need for …
answered May 9 by franko