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Questions about selecting, operating, and maintaining conventional and convection ovens.

3
votes
In almost all respects, cooking in a gas oven is the same as cooking in an electric oven. Some differences you may find: Some gas ovens have a broiler (or grill, in UK parlance) at the top of … the main oven chamber. When using this, you may need to have the door partially opened—see the manual of your particular oven. In most gas ovens, the actual flame elements are beneath the oven floor …
answered Jul 12 '13 by SAJ14SAJ
1
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The turkey is far more sensitive; you don't want to overcook it. Casseroles in general just need to be heated through, and perhaps crisped up. Therefore, I would set the oven to temperature for the …
answered Nov 27 '13 by SAJ14SAJ
3
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recipe. The braising liquid will mitigate the unreliable heat of the oven if it is too hot; if the braise isn't bubbling slowly, you will know it is too low. Braised dishes, by their nature are …
answered Dec 25 '12 by SAJ14SAJ
3
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Cooking meat by time is ill-advised, whether it is on the grill or in the oven. Instead, you should cook by desired outcome, which is the final internal temperature. Pork is done around 155 F / 68 … C, so you should roast it in an oven until it is just a few degrees below the target temperature, as measured by an instant read or probe thermometer inserted into the thickets part of the loin. With …
answered Mar 25 '14 by SAJ14SAJ
3
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becoming less dense and rising when it is heated. This causes the air in the oven to circulate, even if there are no fans, and is called convection. It increases the ability of the air to transfer heat … . Understanding these modes of heat transfer allow you to understand what happens when you use two racks within the oven: Shadowing As radiant heat is a major mode of heating, and infrared is light (just …
answered Nov 13 '13 by SAJ14SAJ
2
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Assuming that you mean a spring form pan, often used for cheesecakes for example: There is absolutely no reason that the type of oven would matter. That seems to be very odd marketing copy. …
answered Jul 27 '13 by SAJ14SAJ
4
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scrambling eggs and bacon on Sunday morning, or preparing a quick chicken sauté dinner on a weeknight. Our conventional fry pans go in the oven and under the broiler. That is one of the primary benefits … of the good All-Clad stuff, or similar cookware from other brands. The only pots you don't want to put in the oven are ones with phenolic (sp?) or other plasticized handles or knobs--although some …
answered Dec 4 '12 by SAJ14SAJ
5
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In a small toaster oven, using a pizza stone is likely to be a tradeoff: Toasting -- counter-productive, because it will shield the bottom of the bread (or other item) from the direct radiative … a full sized oven, the stone would be left far enough from the heating elements that it would not be subject to intense radiative heat. In a toaster oven, it might be too close to the elements when …
answered Jan 21 '13 by SAJ14SAJ
6
votes
It is absolutely safe to do so... For most foods, I would say that there is no reason not to. If they are savory muffins like corn muffins to be served with the roast, I would not hesitate at all. …
answered Mar 31 '14 by SAJ14SAJ
2
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more traditional cooking methods (oven or barbecue), reaching internal temperatures of about 180 F is necessary to get collagen conversion in a reasonable period of time, it can be done in the truly …
answered Nov 26 '13 by SAJ14SAJ
6
votes
The US Fire Administration clearly recommends not leaving cooking appliances unattended when no one is home: Based on 2006-2010 annual averages: Unattended cooking was by far the leading c …
answered Mar 7 '14 by SAJ14SAJ
3
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You can, but I cannot think of a single good reason why you would. 325 F and 350 F are not that far apart; they may even be within the accuracy of most ovens, especially older ones. When you bake …
answered Aug 17 '13 by SAJ14SAJ
1
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there a substitute for the aluminum foil? Why is some metal safe to use in a microwave, but others not? The combination oven by its very nature has a two different cooking modes: microwave, and …
answered Jan 6 '14 by SAJ14SAJ
3
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It is highly likely that the temperature of your oven is too high. While I would recommend simply buying an oven thermometer, which are not very expensive, if you are in a part of the world where … °-450°F dark brown, 230°- 260°C/450°-500°F black, over 260°C/500°F Hopefully, this method will let you estimate the temperature of your oven accurately enough to adjust it within the range …
answered Apr 13 '13 by SAJ14SAJ
4
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The most common method of getting steam into the oven during the first five minutes of baking when it is critical for crust formation, at least for a home style oven is: Place a pan at the bottom … of your oven, and pre-heat as well it while pre-heating your oven. An empty metal loaf pan or even a cast iron skillet would be suitable. The pan should be metal (ceramic or glass may not fare well …
answered Apr 1 '13 by SAJ14SAJ

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