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Questions about preparing or baking cakes, defined as chemically or mechanically (using eggs) leavened flour batter.

5
votes
I don't think you can salvage that cake. That's just way too much vanilla, and you can't take it out. You could take out enough to have two (tea?)spoons of vanilla, though, and use that in a new … cake. For example, if the total volume is now 6 cups, and 2 cups of it is vanilla, you'd need 6 teaspoons of it to get 2 teaspoons of vanilla. You could then make the cake over again, and use that …
answered Apr 19 '17 by Cascabel
6
votes
There's not really anything easy you can do. Even adding lemon zest or essence isn't really going to help; it'll just give you a lemony but still sweet cake. I suppose theoretically you could add … . So unfortunately, you'd be best off shopping around for cake mixes that are more the level of sweetness you want. You might be able to use the nutrition facts to help get a sense of how sweet they are before you buy them. …
answered Sep 12 '16 by Cascabel
3
votes
Again assuming you're using the same recipe... I don't think you need to leap to different kinds of flours as in mrwienerdog's answer. You could be using the same type (probably all-purpose) and even …
answered Jan 30 '11 by Cascabel
2
votes
What really matters is the thickness of the cake, i.e. the depth of the batter in the pans. If you use two 7 inch pans instead of two 9 inch pans, you have 7^2/9^2 or about 60% the area, and you're … still have layers of a reasonable thickness! The recipe says 23-27 minutes, so you might start checking around 18-20 minutes to be safe. (If it were giant you might to worry about the diameter/width of the cake too, but not for something like this.) …
answered Nov 25 '15 by Cascabel
5
votes
There is no default temperature. The recipe is telling you the temperature: 350F. You preheat the oven to 350F so that it's already fully hot when you put the cake in, and then you leave it at 350F … to bake the cake. The whole point of preheating is to have the oven already at the temperature you want to bake at. If you preheated then changed the temperature, then you wouldn't have preheated …
answered Dec 5 '15 by Cascabel
7
votes
I've made a similar cake before - note that it uses clementines, not just any oranges. This is an advantage because their skin is thinner and less bitter than larger oranges. The cooking softens the … bitterness of citrus peel, even between varieties of the same fruit, so it's probably prudent to taste the peel first before you invest time baking a cake out of it. …
answered Jul 31 '13 by Cascabel
16
votes
Since it's last-minute, I'm guessing it'll be tough to work out natural colorings, so I'd avoid doing color-based decorations altogether. You can use chocolate chips or shavings, nuts, fruit (fresh o …
answered Apr 2 '17 by Cascabel
7
votes
If there's leavening in the cake (baking soda or baking powder) that gets activated once incorporated with the rest of the ingredients, and you substantially overmix, you may lose some of its power …
answered Apr 18 '12 by Cascabel
7
votes
The idea of creaming is definitely to incorporate some air into the fat-sugar mixture, which should give the final product a lighter texture. So perhaps your cake was a little heavier than it was …
answered Mar 17 '12 by Cascabel
1
vote
It sounds like it was just a fluffy cheesecake. You didn't describe anything that sounds like it was regular cake, no mention of crumbs or any texture that'd indicate flour and leavening and such …
answered Aug 23 '13 by Cascabel
3
votes
recipe, it's also possible that whoever wrote it was compensating for a too-cold oven. Also, make sure that the cake is centered in the oven. The top of the oven is hotter, and too high a rack can … sensitive cake, I'd definitely try loosely covering with foil. Protecting the pie crusts is such a common version of this that you can buy pie shields, rings of metal to cover just the outside edge. I …
answered Dec 7 '13 by Cascabel
1
vote
As Aaronut said, it'd definitely be best to just find a pineapple cake recipe. But if you have a pineapple upside down cake recipe that you're really attached to, you could always just try it …
answered Sep 5 '13 by Cascabel
3
votes
It's vegetable oil spread, not vegetable oil. It's just another name for margarine, which is normally made from vegetable oil. So substitute as you would for margarine, because that's what it is. Wit …
answered Jul 20 '13 by Cascabel
6
votes
even sure if it takes significantly more leavening than you'd need if you'd creamed butter and sugar, since cake batters are wet, so sugar will generally dissolve more and not provide a structural … component. Some cake recipes don't even bother with a creaming step. In any case, it obviously works. Creaming butter and sugar is perhaps more of a factor in cookies, as mentioned in this question, for example. …
answered Jun 14 '12 by Cascabel
3
votes
area. So you only need 1/4 of the box, and 1/4 of the ingredients you'd add to it. So, if you have a scale, you could measure 3.8oz of the cake mix, and otherwise you'll need to measure the whole …
answered May 26 '16 by Cascabel