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Questions about what ingredients can be used in the brining liquid and how the brining will affect the food.

2
votes
You might want to explore "equilibrium brining." While a bit slower, it makes it very difficult to over-brine and have a product that is too salty. See this link for details: http://www.chefsteps.com/activities/equilibrium-brining
answered Sep 19 '14 by moscafj
1
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There is a difference between brining and marinating. Brines are salt based solutions that work to make meat jucier. It works by osmosis. First water leaves the meat, then returns with the salt … from the brine. Because the meat cells now contain more salt, water remains during cooking. Brining means juicy meat, but it is also salted. This impacts flavor and texture. In my experience some …
answered Aug 3 '17 by moscafj
3
votes
Some considerations: Typical chicken brines range from 5 - 10% salinity. The sea averages 3.5% salinity (there are variables such as region, distance from estuaries, and weather that also impact oc …
answered May 5 by moscafj
2
votes
In a brine, I would simply toss in the whole thing, stem and leaves, for parsley. In fact, parsley stems are quite flavorful. Thyme benefits from a bit of bruising to release the aroma and flavor. So …
answered Oct 22 by moscafj
9
votes
There certainly are proponents of brining beef to impact texture and flavor. In my looking across the internets, it appears that dry "brining" is more common than wet, but both are used for steaks …
answered Jul 8 by moscafj
1
vote
Brining is a process that hydrates...or forces liquid into the cell structure of the product...to slow or prevent dehydration. This would certainly slow your dehydration step, perhaps dramatically …
answered Jul 14 '13 by moscafj
2
votes
If you are at about 3-4% salt or higher and this sat around for a week, you probably have some lacto-fermented green beans. They are technically pickled. Botulism will not thrive in a salt/acid envir …
answered Sep 8 '15 by moscafj
1
vote
Color and texture are not reliable indicators of food safety. You have to think freshness, temperature and environment. If the pork has been kept in the refrigerator the entire time (under 40 degree …
answered Nov 14 '16 by moscafj
1
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Greg Blonder has the best information that I've found on the effects of brining and marinating. In fact, the "food myths" section of his website, has a lot of objective food science. There are … several links that are pertinent to your questions. You can see here, that Blonder uses dye to illustrate the effect of brining. He concludes that brining is almost always a surface treatment (with the …
answered Nov 18 by moscafj