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Results tagged with Search options user 20183

Questions about handling, preparing, or cooking chicken, either whole or parts.

3
votes
Are you cutting up the breasts for your application, or keeping them whole? I ask because boneless chicken breasts (as well as just about everything else) are easier to slice cleanly if they're a bit … (but not completely) frozen. How much time do you have between "I have hard frozen chicken breasts" to "I want to start cooking"? If it's morning where you are and you want to cook tonight, just …
answered Sep 17 '13 by Jolenealaska
4
votes
home environment assuming healthy, non-pregnant, adult eaters, but that's not my call to make concerning your food. What you may face is a quality issue. The texture of your chicken may be negatively … effected by refreezing. The smaller your pieces of chicken, and the saucier the dish, the less likely it is that you will notice this negative affect on the chicken. …
answered Jan 24 '15 by Jolenealaska
4
votes
searing at a very high heat. Here's a pretty typical recipe for Southern Fried Chicken Gizzards. It starts with simmering the gizzards for 45 minutes or longer, then cooling, then breading. Safety really … , chicken or turkey giblets are cooked by simmering in water for use in flavoring soups, gravies or poultry stuffing. Once cooked, the liver will become crumbly and the heart and gizzard will soften …
answered Oct 10 '14 by Jolenealaska
4
votes
No instructions are going to be that precise; there are too many variables at play. What temperature was the chicken before you started? Exactly how big are the pieces? How precisely can you measure … and maintain the temperature of the oven or cooking medium? What you need to be sure that your chicken is perfectly done is an instant read thermometer. At first, aim for 165F (74C), that's the …
answered May 29 '14 by Jolenealaska
2
votes
You have to get the chicken "tacky". It's great to soak it in buttermilk for a while, let the buttermilk drip off and then bread the chicken. You can also use egg. Some people use flour, then egg … , then breading. It all works, but somehow the chicken needs to be sticky for breading like you describe to stick. …
answered May 14 '14 by Jolenealaska
5
votes
2answers
The first comment or answer that says "Alaska" will be promptly downvoted. Seriously though, I keep hearing about the superiority of "stewing hens" for stocks and soups, and I'd really like to get my …
asked Sep 21 '13 by Jolenealaska
2
votes
4answers
Perfect fried chicken is the Great White Whale in my kitchen. It seems I've tried everything, well almost everything, I have not tried sous-vide. I'm still on the fence as to whether I'm going to …
asked Aug 13 '14 by Jolenealaska
0
votes
That won't be an issue as far as the safety of the chicken, if anything it might negatively affect the quality. It's never a safety concern to freeze anything that was safe before went into the freezer. …
answered Nov 29 '15 by Jolenealaska
1
vote
3answers
I happened to be at the grocery store just as they marked down that day's rotisserie chicken. I planned to use chicken breasts for tomorrow's Sesame Noodles with Shredded Chicken, but at that price … it was hard to turn down rotisserie chicken. So now I've got it shredded, and as grocery store rotisserie chicken tends to be, the flavor is really nice. It's missing some char though. The sauce I'm …
asked Apr 4 '14 by Jolenealaska
2
votes
It depends upon the strength of your brine, for boneless chicken breasts I recommend a 5% brine for 30 minutes to an hour. Ideally, salt for brining should be measured by weight, especially since … 5% solution for 3-5 hours, a whole chicken for 12-16 hours (roughly). Also, be sure that your chicken does not have water added, as many frozen, bulk pieces do. In effect, those chicken pieces are already brined. …
answered Nov 26 '14 by Jolenealaska
3
votes
Aaronut's answer is fine, I'm just coming at it from a slightly different assumption. Sandwiches like these are common in gas stations and convenience stores in the US. You can buy them in multi-pack …
answered Aug 3 '14 by Jolenealaska
2
votes
, experimentation is playing with food-safety fire. Homemade chicken jerky for dogs was loudly in the news a few years ago because a lot of dogs got sick and even mysteriously died after eating chicken jerky dog … treats imported from China. To my knowledge, the mystery has never been solved, but a lot of people started making their own chicken jerky at that point. I have no idea if there is any benefit to …
answered Mar 1 '15 by Jolenealaska
2
votes
(or unclarified butter, for that matter) depends upon several factors, including how it is manufactured and/or clarified. If you're looking for breaded, bone-in fried chicken ala KFC, don't try to … much butter would be really expensive for cooking oil that can't handle multiple uses. If you are looking to deep fry whole (bone in) breaded chicken thighs, for instance, it's pretty much unheard of …
answered Jun 19 '16 by Jolenealaska
2
votes
Often, yogurt will drain away excess liquid in that length of time, thickening the yogurt. If left to drain overnight, a lot of yogurts will drain away a huge quantity of whey (yogurt water), some yog …
answered Apr 12 '14 by Jolenealaska
9
votes
picture I like from DamnFineLife: But, I suspect that one has been very much prettied up for the camera. This one is from the blog Fit Foodie Megha, which does restaurant reviews. The chicken was … world class chef Hemant Oberoi, who the blogger credits with making Atta Chicken famous beyond Kotkapura. Not coincidentally, it is Chef Oberoi who the OP learned about on NPR and inspired the question …
answered Aug 4 '16 by Jolenealaska

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