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Results tagged with Search options user 20183

All about the scientific theories behind food. Cooking myths debunked here.

2
votes
That is certainly a stew. I might further refer to that as a hot-pot if the ingredients were raw before added to the broth, particularly if it's cooked at the table.
answered May 26 '15 by Jolenealaska
46
votes
Short answer? Not a damn thing. The term is pretty much meaningless in the US; at best it only means that the product doesn't have added colors, artificial flavors or synthetic "stuff". From the FDA: …
answered Feb 7 '15 by Jolenealaska
6
votes
The thickening in Bearnaise, as in mayonnaise, is not so much in the ingredients as in the technique. These sauces get their thickness by being emulsified. An emulsion is formed by rapidly mixing, wh …
answered Aug 15 '14 by Jolenealaska
5
votes
Taste the uncooked pretzels. That's the key. The baking soda won't affect how they bake; if the uncooked pretzels taste OK, they'll be fine. That's my opinion, there is disagreement, see the comments. …
answered Dec 15 '14 by Jolenealaska
2
votes
Good pot pie has a layer between the biscuit or pie crust and the filling. That layer is goopy, it takes on properties of both of the other elements. Without that kind of middle layer, the two element …
answered Sep 23 '15 by Jolenealaska
10
votes
Most white rice produced in the US is thoroughly washed then fortified. So, Americans don't usually wash white rice. It's fine if you do, though. Rice imported from other countries may not be either w …
answered Aug 26 '16 by Jolenealaska