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A dairy product made by churning milk to separate the butterfat from other milk components. Questions may involve butter either as an ingredient or as a final dish.

3
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It's really a matter of preference. Some people like the salty dimension that butter gives along with clotted cream and jam, others think the cream is enough saturated fat to be going on with. …
answered Jun 6 '15 by ElendilTheTall
3
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I would use vegetable oil personally, as quite often what's labelled vegetable oil is made from canola. Sunflower oil would also work, and probably groundnut/peanut oil. Any neutral tasting oil would …
answered Sep 13 '13 by ElendilTheTall
7
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The foaming is caused by the water in the butter boiling away. The main reason you wait for it to subside is simply because that means the butter has had long enough to reach a proper temperature for … cooking: too cold and the food will absorb the butter rather than fry in it. However, this usually applies more to recipes that require relatively fast cooking. You'd sweat onions or scramble eggs when the foaming starts, for example. …
answered Jun 5 '11 by ElendilTheTall
13
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You can't really substitute double cream for butter as the fat/water ratio is different - it's basically just too wet. However, guess what they make butter out of - cream! If you 'over whip' cream … , the fat separates from the liquid leaving you with fresh butter. Naturally this is easy if you have an electric mixer. If you're doing it by hand, prepare to be tired. …
answered Sep 14 '15 by ElendilTheTall
3
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You've pretty much answered your own question. Put the PB in a blender, drizzle in a little peanut oil, blitz and season to taste with salt and a little sugar if you want it. I'd add them all slowly: …
answered Jul 19 '12 by ElendilTheTall
4
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Yes, you should be able to get away with it, but it does depend on how salty the butter is. Might be worth making one batch and seeing how it turns out. …
answered May 25 '12 by ElendilTheTall
6
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All coconut milk separates out. When you buy it tinned, there is often a plug of coconut cream above a pocket of coconut milk. But it certainly should recombine. It may well have been too cold when yo …
answered Oct 31 '14 by ElendilTheTall
7
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I used to use a pastry cutter, but it was hard work and a pain in the butt clearing the blockages. So I switched to using a food processor. It's so much quicker, and providing you cut the cold butter into 1x5cm sticks, it yields perfect results with just a few pulses. …
answered Oct 9 '12 by ElendilTheTall
2
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The natural answer would be to add a little more flour. You will probably need to leave the dough out of the fridge a while to soften so you can fold/mix in the flour until the mixture stiffens suffic …
answered Nov 30 '11 by ElendilTheTall
1
vote
Chop the fats into small cubes and leave them near (but not on) a heat source like a radiator. Chopping them small allows them to warm up more quickly and evenly.
answered Feb 13 '17 by ElendilTheTall
9
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time adding air to the mixture. The air bubbles introduced during creaming expand during cooking, making the cookies rise and giving a lighter texture. Cookies baked with under-creamed butter would therefore remain fairly flat and dense. …
answered Apr 18 '11 by ElendilTheTall
10
votes
Squid ink is used to make black pasta, no reason it wouldn't work with butter. Good fishmongers should be able to source it for you. …
answered Dec 6 '11 by ElendilTheTall
7
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I would avoid putting it in the dough as it will change the texture. I'd simply make sure I had plenty of 'bare' crust, then after cooking, brush it with softened salted butter. For extra flavor I'd mix the butter with minced garlic and dried oregano first. …
answered Jun 28 '11 by ElendilTheTall