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2
votes
The pan has to be hot, but this doesn't mean that it has to be the hottest setting you can get. There is a temperature at which you can get bubbles without burning them, you have to play around with t …
answered Dec 1 '14 by rumtscho
5
votes
I disagree with Neil's answer here. All the three terms of "poaching", "boiling" or "simmering" require that your food is fully submerged, especially for poaching it has to be free-floating in a large …
answered Jun 27 '15 by rumtscho
21
votes
I am afraid Chef Flambe's answer is wrong. Not everything has a melting point and a boiling point. Oil is made of big organic molecules, containing long carbon chains*. Unlike anorganic substances w …
answered Jan 18 '12 by rumtscho
1
vote
I have been cooking on induction stoves for several years now, and I RTFM. The temperature numbers you get are from a sensor just below the glass. They are !not! the temperature of the food inside t …
answered Jan 9 '14 by rumtscho
1
vote
The one alternative is ceramic pans. They are pretty awesome as long as they don't stick, much better than Teflon. However, they fail earlier, after maybe 6 months of regular, but not heavy, use. Afte …
answered Jul 13 '14 by rumtscho
2
votes
Manufacrurers measure the rim, so I guess the recipe calls for a pan which is 20 cm across the rim. It may seem counterintuitive that the recipe specifies such a small pan (that's less than 8 inch f …
answered Sep 20 '11 by rumtscho
2
votes
This pan is not cast iron, it is forged iron. As far as I am aware, the grooves are simply a side effect of the manufacturing process in which the iron is "stamped", not intended to have an effect on …
answered Aug 15 '16 by rumtscho
4
votes
Downsides: Copper is toxic. You have to get the inside lined with tin. Tin has a very low melting point and can melt during cooking. Even if it doesn't, it wears off with usage and the pan has to b …
answered Jul 18 '12 by rumtscho
2
votes
Look at the size of your hob, it is probably up to 24 cm. Imagine putting a straight-sided pan on it and filling it 1.5 - 2 cm deep with cut vegetables (the pieces don't have to be exactly a single la …
answered Apr 19 '17 by rumtscho
7
votes
Then you aren't using "low to medium heat". The heat is defined by how quickly your food cooks, not by the setting on the stove. Lower your heat until the food fries at a reasonable rate. As for the o …
answered Aug 8 '18 by rumtscho
2
votes
It is not something that I would do - I just use stainless with sufficient oil. But if you really want to try it, then yes, you can make it stick. It is more difficult than with cast iron, but it is n …
answered Apr 8 '17 by rumtscho
7
votes
First, you don't crowd the pan when sauteing. If you do it, you are no longer sauteing, because your food doesn't come in contact with the surface frequently enough. You also can't really keep the sep …
answered Feb 7 '15 by rumtscho
1
vote
Instead of endless comment discussions, I decided to post an answer. First of all, I totally agree with Jefromi. Nobody in the world knows how to produce durable non-stick pans (if we form our expec …
answered Feb 11 '14 by rumtscho
5
votes
These don't look like scratches to me, more like heat damage. You are either using it for the wrong tasks (e.g. steak), or using it improperly (e.g. preheating it), or the extremely frequent use is si …
answered Sep 10 '16 by rumtscho
4
votes
There is no really good solution for this, as non-stick pans are by nature slick, and oils bead on them. My preferred solution is to use the right tool/technique for the job. Breaded items are norma …
answered Apr 26 '13 by rumtscho