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Questions about the selection and preparation of tea leaves and beverages.

2
votes
In general, your description - dark green balls which unroll to full tea leaves, sounds like some variety of gunpowder green tea. It is a quite common Chinese technique, as I recall. Each pellet … (also sometimes called "pearls") is a rolled and dried tea leaf, which unfurls when steeped. However, it is difficult to get more specific than that without more information. There are several types …
answered Jul 22 '16 by Megha
28
votes
Chai masala variants may be boiled that long or more – they do contain black tea, but also spices (where the boiling is needed, to extract the flavor from whole spices). The tea decoction this … coolly and weakly brewed variety you seem to be familiar with. In fact, it is even possible that the tea was plain black tea, brewed very strongly. Served with plenty of milk and sugar to balance the …
answered Aug 10 '16 by Megha
1
vote
liquid. With the thinning a paste method, it is fairly easy to use spoon, fork, butter-knife, chopstick, or, well, whatever. Since I usually like tea a bit on the cooler side, I sometimes loosen it …
answered May 26 '17 by Megha
5
votes
There's a couple things I think are important, about this style of tea brewing - and which might help clear up some confusion. First is, you mention the bitterness...the tea made this way … the mouth to doctor the flavor at the source. The strong bitterness is part of the flavor, and part of the expectation, of tea brewed this way, and weaker (ie, non-bitter) tea flavor ends up feeling …
answered Jan 11 by Megha
6
votes
explained scientifically, but that isn't really the same thing. The "standard" brew times you mention are from the western method of brewing tea, which is meant to efficiently extract the majority of … people taking a standard amount (tea-spoon) and brewing the tea in hot water till all the flavor was soaked out of it, and then varying the time up or down and taste-testing to let people find a compromise …
answered Sep 9 '16 by Megha
2
votes
I do this an awful lot, I drink a lot of tea, and since I started getting better quality loose-leaf instead of teabags - I wanted to get the most out of my tea. My daily mug is a three-cup one, so … I'm used to brewing that amount as well. I can usually get three mugs brewed tea, and two more boiled - though some brands will give three to five steeps boiling, for 8-10 steeps for one basket of …
answered Sep 5 '16 by Megha
1
vote
So, you can obviously keep your tea at the 4-6 cup concentration by just not diluting it before storage, that is perhaps a reasonable amount to keep in a bottle in the fridge and should require no … will also be one less variable when you're trying various extra-concentrated brewed tea methods, if you're used to mixing from concentrate you can more easily tell if the problem with a batch is the …
answered Oct 20 '16 by Megha
1
vote
it would be because this kind of grading works when the leaves and buds are not separated, so buds picked by themselves make a tea blend that is 100% bud, buds picked with one leaf end up with a … basic idea that the more leaves are picked (per bud) the fewer buds you'll get in any given serving of tea, holds true. Additionally, since the youngest leaves are higher quality, there is very …
answered Jun 10 '18 by Megha
5
votes
I was interested in making pine needle tea myself, and for much the same reasons - historical use, curiosity about survival practices, wanting to try something different. I've done a bit of research … sort of thing. Since you mentioned the aboriginal people's use of such tea, I would recommend you follow one of their primary safety considerations - know your tree. They knew what was safe, what was …
answered Dec 9 '16 by Megha
2
votes
tea used - the more that is the case, the more the initial tea quality will matter. The few times I've had kombucha, it has seemed not terribly similar to plain tea - thus I would think the … something is, the less any individual ingredient matters. Tea is a major ingredient in kombucha, so changing the grade should make a difference in the final taste. Kombucha is fermented and sweetened, so I …
answered Oct 18 '16 by Megha
4
votes
that has taken considerable effort to get properly suspended in the tea. Matcha tea is very expensive because it is exceedingly high quality, and carefully ground smooth and stored well, and this is … because the powder is all meant to be ingested. If it was meant to be filtered out and removed, then it would simply be green tea, and it would be much easier to have larger flakes and lower standards …
answered Dec 9 '16 by Megha
1
vote
The descriptions of grape leaf tea I have seen don't mention a specific age to pick the leaves at - so leaves of most any age are likely to be fine, it probably isn't necessary to only pick those of … mention medicinal value, which means you should be careful about dosages until you're sure about the effects drinking the tea will have on you. In general, I would expect the tea to be made from mature …
answered Jul 1 '16 by Megha
2
votes
A few suggestions that might help with the tea stains include rubbing with baking soda and water, or soaking in hot water and dishwasher detergent several hours, even overnight, before washing … this happening again - not just for aesthetic purposes, but from the way the color concentrated along the lines of the cracked glaze, it looks like maybe a potential safety issue if tea residues can't …
answered Sep 9 '16 by Megha
3
votes
with so many different brewed drinks. I see no particular reason a tea or extract can't be made of these oak chips, or such chips used to add tannic elements to other teas. If you have access to oak …
answered Feb 19 '17 by Megha