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139

See the improved answer here: What DOES Help? Which acid works best to keep avocados from browning? Answer: None (of the acids tested) It's not that acid doesn't do much to help. ALL OF THE ACIDS TESTED CAUSED AVOCADOS TO BECOME MORE BROWN AND TO BECOME BROWN FASTER THAN NO TREATMENT AT ALL I am not kidding. Method For acid, I used freshly squeezed ...


55

TL; DR Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) works to slow, even halt the browning of avocados, even in the face of salt, vinegar (in salsa), and lime juice, all of which have been shown (or will be shown) to speed browning. At a concentration of 100mg per 50 grams of avocado, it is also virtually tasteless. You can buy pure ascorbic acid powder, which I did and then ...


34

Nice experiment. Oddly enough food scientists in Florida have looked into the same problem, and achieved results similar to yours: THE RETARDATION OF ENZYMATIC BROWNING IN AVOCADO PUREE AND GUACAMOLE Enzymatic browning in avocado puree and guacamole was evaluated by reflectance measurements for several varieties of avocado with varying amounts of ...


26

I'm culling a lot of information from one of my favorite cocktail books for this one. Yes, limes have a slightly higher acid content (on average) than lemons do - about 6% for limes, compared to 4.5% for lemons. More importantly for their flavor, lemons have about 2% total sugar, while limes have somewhere between 0.5% and 0.75%. Sugar/sweetness has quite ...


24

We shouldn't cook acids, alkali and concentrated salts on teflon. This is incorrect. Teflon (PTFE) itself is one of the most non-reactive substances you can use on cookware, in some ways better than ceramic. To quote Wikipedia: It is nonreactive, partly because of the strength of carbon–fluorine bonds, and so it is often used in containers and ...


12

No, it has nothing to do with the acidity of your sauce. It took a lot longer to cook because of the prevalent temperature throughout the pan, and the mass of the material being heated. Sauce + Noodles is a lot to heat up, a lot more than just a pot of water. It's also unlikely you fully boiled the Sauce + Noodles as you would have with water (to a full ...


11

I don't know where your information came from about "We shouldn't cook acids, alkali and concentrated salts on teflon", but it is incorrect. Teflon is the least chemically reactive material you are likely to encounter in daily life. There probably are a few substances that can react with it, but if you have a way of sourcing these, you hopefully won't be ...


9

Citric acid in canned goods is just a preservative, nothing to do with "ripening in the can" as far as I know. As you've noticed, it's plenty common in storebought canned food, but it's especially useful in homemade canned food. It keeps canned vegetables from darkening/browning over time, and can be used to make them acidic enough to avoid worries about ...


9

Short answer — it's definitely not that simple. For one thing, the pH scale is logarithmic, not linear. For another, almost every acid and base you're likely to encounter in a kitchen is “weak” - meaning there's an equilibrium between neutral and ionized forms. When diluted, the equilibria shift. When the temperature changes, the equilibria shift. When ...


8

Low acid products must be pressure canned. Products intended for sale must be canned in FDA registered facilities and typically inspected by a state regulator. Many areas still have community canneries with some being FDA registered and state inspected where you can prepare your product with equipment that is well suited to the task. These community ...


8

You can neutralize the acidity of your drink by adding a half teaspoon of baking soda, but don't do this. Apart from fizzing up like a volcano, your lemon drink, or what is left of it, will taste pretty awful. What you want to do is reduce the perceived acidity. This can be done simply by adding more honey. I suggest adding a teaspoon at a time until it ...


7

There's a bit of trickery going on in the comparison of vinegar (acetic acid) to spirits of salt (hydrochloric acid). Your 5% (0.83 molar) vinegar has a pH of about 2.5. You need much less of the stronger acid, HCl, to reach that same pH (2.5); in fact only 0.003 molar, a factor of 277 less. Since you taste the anion (acetate or chloride), not the proton (H+)...


7

There is really no way to reduce the acidity in a marinade or sauce without creating undesirable flavor compounds. Adding a base would neutralize the acid but would also produce salts which don't taste so good. If you are making a marinade then simply add less acid to it, however if you are using bottled sauce then you have a few options to deal with the ...


6

The major protein in cow's milk, casein precipitates at pH 4.6. It matters very little which acid you use to get to 4.6, casein will still precipitate. pH 4.6 is about the same acidity as canned beets, a food not known for its tartness, so you won't achieve a very sour flavor before things start curding up on you. Adding emulsifiers could help some with the ...


6

Propanethiol S-oxide gas will stop the browning affect on the surface of avocados. This sulfur oxide is found in the gas formed from cutting bitter/sharp onions. When storing guacamole in a bowl, place a half an onion chopped inside a smaller bowl, then place the smaller bowl in the center on top of the guacamole. Then cover with saran wrap as to not remove ...


6

At its simplest, guacamole is just mashed avocado. Avocado is not particularly acidic on its own, so add whatever non-acidic ingredients you like. Consider cilantro, sour cream or whatever low or non-acid flavorings suit you. See: Browning Avocados - What Helps? for more on acid and avocados.


6

Weak organic acids such as those found in fruits and vegetables (citric acid, malic acid, tartaric acid) don't react with sugars. 1 There is no change in acidity, which you correctly defined as measured by the pH. At the same time, sweet and sour are two tastes which are real antagonists - adding something sweet actually reducess the sourness we perceive, ...


6

A simple way is to, upon cutting, place your chopped onions into a bowl of ice water for 10-15 minutes before tossing into your salad (sans water, of course). I find this takes the 'spicy bite' and pungency out of them and leaves the crunch - whereas acid seems to affect the texture of the onion.


6

The little 1/2 & 1/2 containers are ultra-pasteurized, so that they can be stable at room temperature. Ultra-pasteurized milk products will not curdle. This is why you cannot make cheese with them. It is also possible that the Keurig coffee, being better roasted and sealed, is more acidic, but it is far more likely the UP milk. You can test this by ...


6

While there might be an acceleration effect, sugar on its own is very capable of drawing out liquids quickly. Two other effects are probably much more important: lemon juice is very effective in stopping cut fruit from oxidizing/enzymatic browning. taste balancing. Fruit is naturally sweet and sour, adding heavy amounts of sugar can upset that balance too ...


6

You can not prevent your pasta from overcooking but you can make it more mushy (and unpalatable) The effect of acidity is very noticeable with potatoes, adding a shot of vinegar will let you cook almost paper-thin slices without them falling apart, while adding soda does the opposite. This article goes in detail and has close-up images of the results I ...


6

I don't know that I can give a definitive answer about safety, knowing little about how clean your apparatus was to begin with, how exactly you have it set up (container type, how you are "burping," etc.). Most importantly, I don't know what recipe you used and whether it was verified as safe through a scientific process.[*See note] All of that said, your ...


5

While you can add things to your product to make it shelf stable, most of them are either going to be prohibitive to use at a small level or they will significantly change your sauce. For instance, industrial preservatives like calcium proprionate can be used as a preservative in some meat preparations, but the usage level is usually around .1-.4%, which ...


5

If you want to raise the pH of your tomato sauce, add a quarter to a half teaspoon (1-2.5 g) of pickling lime (calcium hydroxide, Cal, slaked lime) per quart (L) of sauce. You could also use sodium bicarbonate, but that adds an awful flavor when you add enough to raise the pH. Celery, like sugar, will mask the acidity, but not reduce it. To do that you need ...


5

For anything of this kind, I would use lemon juice. It is acidic while not being overpowering like a vinegar can be. It performs the same job in, for example, fruit pies - a little lemon juice enhances the fruitiness and flavour of whatever the main fruit is.


5

If you want to avoid adding liquid, you could add sumac, anardana or amchur - these are somewhat exotic, but these days usually obtainable, dry spices that are also sour.


4

Well I live in Mexico, and here we eat lime and almost every dish, but here is known as lemon even is not (some misconceptions when got to traduce on the very begininig it arrived to Mexico). When I make guacamole I use lime and extra virgin oil, and if u put some virgin olive oil on a cut avocado will last longer. However, we used cilantro and onion (not ...


4

Since the publication of Antoine Lavoisier's revised Easter Memoir in 1778, it has been understood (although not at first universally accepted) that acids generally are oxidising agents. However, I note that, somewhat unusually for an acid, formic acid can act as a reducing agent (the opposite of an oxidising agent). My understanding is that this unusual ...


4

You neutralize acid by adding a base. Generally bases are bitter tasting. Black tea is a base, as is baking soda (sodium bicarbonate). The problem is that when you add an acid to a base you get salts. What we call salt is NaCL, which is just one example of a salt, there are many others, and those salts can add all sorts of undesirable flavor combinations. So ...


4

Most bacteria in homes grow in biofilms. Like the whitish stuff that accumulates on your teeth during the day or slimy dirt on plugholes. A biofilm is a three-dimentional structure, usually made of polysaccharides, which protects the bacteria that are inside. It can even form quasi-differentiated structures, similar to fungi organs. Biofilms are extremely ...


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