Hot answers tagged

24

We shouldn't cook acids, alkali and concentrated salts on teflon. This is incorrect. Teflon (PTFE) itself is one of the most non-reactive substances you can use on cookware, in some ways better than ceramic. To quote Wikipedia: It is nonreactive, partly because of the strength of carbon–fluorine bonds, and so it is often used in containers and ...


11

I don't know where your information came from about "We shouldn't cook acids, alkali and concentrated salts on teflon", but it is incorrect. Teflon is the least chemically reactive material you are likely to encounter in daily life. There probably are a few substances that can react with it, but if you have a way of sourcing these, you hopefully won't be ...


9

Short answer — it's definitely not that simple. For one thing, the pH scale is logarithmic, not linear. For another, almost every acid and base you're likely to encounter in a kitchen is “weak” - meaning there's an equilibrium between neutral and ionized forms. When diluted, the equilibria shift. When the temperature changes, the equilibria shift. When ...


4

I don't know that I can give a definitive answer about safety, knowing little about how clean your apparatus was to begin with, how exactly you have it set up (container type, how you are "burping," etc.). Most importantly, I don't know what recipe you used and whether it was verified as safe through a scientific process.[*See note] All of that said, your ...


4

I think your fat-to-flour ratio for that kind of flour might be too high. Cake flour can't handle a lot of fat. As another answer suggested, try a higher protein flour--start with all-purpose (AP) flour and, if that isn't enough, use bread flour but remember to barely stir it together or you will make a mess. I would mix everything together except the flour ...


3

I use Calcium hydroxide, (pickling lime, Cal, slaked lime), to raise the pH of my tomato sauces. It does not take much, and you don't get that nasty flavor that comes with using sodium bicarbonate. You can find the stuff in the canning aisle in a U.S. grocery store. Mexican and Asian stores also usually carry it. The Latinos use Cal to nixtamalize corn ...


3

There are a number of problems with this: First, pH is a log scale, as RalphMudhouse explained. This means you cannot simply average the pH of your components--it's a lot more complicated than that. Still, this point would suggest that you could somehow calculate the pH, except... pH is only well-defined for water-based solutions. The definition of pH is ...


2

Rice wine vinegar If you are using plain rice wine, then you aren't going to get much acidity. Rice wine vinegar will give you a higher acidity to flavor ratio. I generally add rice wine as part of the stir fry process; I almost always make curry in the following order: aromatics (i.e. ginger, ground spices) -> stir fry vegetables/meat -> add liquid. Rice ...


2

I regularly use baking soda for that purpose to protect what is remaining of my enamel. To allow for the increase in volume as a result of any foaming, use a large container so that the top of the liquid does not go higher than the 3/4 mark. It is also advisable to leave it overnight in the fridge to let the baking soda dissolve completely. The taste is ...


1

Baking soda is ok but what I found work better is honey. Especially in dishes that gain from sugar. Like for example tomato sauce. Sugar neutralize the acidic while not adding extra taste (like soda does) but just the sweetens that can embellish herbs. Honey (especially if you have honeydew honey that have this natural "forest" feel).


1

Along with kingledion's great answer I'd add the following: plain old white vinegar. It has a punchy acidity but is otherwise quite flavour and odorless. It's an absolute staple in my kitchen since you can add it to nearly anything to boost flavor without much altering it.


1

Acidity helps the avocado/guac stay fresh, without acidity it oxidizes fast & it turns brown.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible