10

A general rule-of-thumb is that a butterfat content of 30% or more is required to produce whipped cream. Half and half (called half cream in the UK), which is comprised of half milk and half cream has a butterfat content between 10 - and 12.5% butterfat, based on various sources discovered in my research. That being said, I've read that half and half can ...


9

From a seller's product description1: In der Backindustrie verwendet man Lupinenmehl als Zusatz zu Brotmischungen, da es das Brot aromatisiert, elastischer und länger haltbar macht. (The baking industry uses lupin flour as additive in bread mixes because it makes the bread more aromatic, elastic and increases shelf life.) Another description2: Das ...


9

BHA, BHT and/or TBHQ aren't added to the packaging to keep the cereal from spoiling. It's actually added to keep the box from spoiling. As you stated, BHA and BHT slows down the oxidization of fats and oils. It keeps them from going rancid. And while some of this preservative will migrate into the cereal, many cereals don't actually have any fats or oils. ...


9

Hey guys, since the question was posted they opened up Modernist Pantry, which specifically caters to this need. They supply chemicals for molecular gastronomy in consumer-sized portions. For $10 or less apiece, you can order small amounts of emulsifiers, gelling agents, foaming agents, etc. They also have spherification kits, the Texturas products, and ...


9

Foie Gras is fatty goose or duck liver. There is no machine or process to make it. It is harvested from the animals themselves. Restaurants have providers for their product. You will have to find one for yourself. I know of no legitimate substitute for Foie Gras that anyone would not care about. People pay a lot of money for Foie Gras and would be quite ...


8

I can think of adding alkali or acid substances mainly as means of changing the ph of the dough. And adding can be understood as in the dough, or on its surface. Alkali/basic additives or ingredients Gluten only works if PH is between 3 and 11. Outside those values it loses its stength. Before reaching PH>11 it will make flour have a higher absorption. ...


7

It sounds like you mean capers. They're salty and sour. They come in a variety of sizes, with the smaller ones pretty round, and the larger perhaps sometimes a bit more oblong. See Google image search to see if they look right!


6

This depends on what is in your bread improver. Cream of tartar is salt which acts as a buffer. If the bread improver also contains acid (ascorbic acid is sometimes an ingredient), it makes it harder to distinguish, because it will react similarly in many circumstances. The first simple test would be to add baking soda to a solution of each ingredient. If ...


5

After some more research, I stumbled onto this post. The "standard ice cream" recipe linked from there uses 0.4% of a "stabilizer blend" (8g out of 1950g of ingredients). GMS and CMC would fall into the stabilizers and emulsifiers category. I used 7g of GMS and 1g of CMC, which seems to be a fairly common ratio in recipes using these ingredients. The ...


5

Alkaline solutions are added to wheat noodle dough when it is too be pulled by hand. The alkaline substance will break down the gluten connections to make a more pliable dough See What flour and technique do I need for hand pulled noodles?


4

http://www.ukfoodguide.net/enumeric.htm The E numbers are standardized across all EU nations. I'm not even aware if non EU nations use them?


3

Most sources recommend 0.1% or so, but not more than than 0.5%. Try to use only enough to achieve the preservative results you desire. In other words, for 1000g of flour, start with 1g of calcium propionate. If that works good for you, then stop there. If you still think it's spoiling too soon, then next time try 2g of calcium propionate for 1000g of flour....


3

The FDA has a page for color additives and a separate one for food additives. They're fairly concise; they refer to but don't link to the complete documents. (I'll try and find those at some point.) For the EU, I believe you want E numbers. There's actually a pretty solid E number article on Wikipedia. On the EU site, there's a list of authorized food ...


3

The EU has a list of food additives in which everything is given a number (so you don't have to deal with companies trying to hide things using alternate names): https://webgate.ec.europa.eu/sanco_foods/main/?sector=FAD Many of the colorings are under Group II and Group III, but many other items (eg, fruit and vegetable juices) can be used as coloring, so ...


3

Use 0.3% of Glycerol Monostearate, it is plenty to stabilise the emulsion. CMC is generaly used in quantity ranging from 0.05 to 0.15% in the ice cream industry.


3

Chlorinated tap water. The effect on the ferment may be negligible, but I've never bothered to test it, lest there be unwanted putrefaction. Boil the water that you're going to use to make your brine, then add salt and let cool. The chlorine should volatilize at the boil.


3

E627 can be produced from seaweed, and 631 may be produced from tapioca starch. Thus, both may be properly vegan. Or not. What does it make the food? With all honesty, it makes food don't know category. You can't assert it's vegan, and you can't be sure it isn't. If you are going to feed your vegan friends, buy ingredients with guaranteed vegan origin. If ...


3

A mixture of sodium bicarbonate (which is alkaline) and tartaric acid is commonly used as a chemical leavener in baking. If flour is mixed with small amounts of these substances, then carbon dioxide gas will form when water is added to the mixture creating small bubbles in the batter or dough. The mixture is typically cooked as soon as possible after the ...


3

The short answer is no, half and half doesn't have the fat content necessary. You will have to add something with high fat content. As stated above you could try adding some evaporated milk, or even clarified butter to bring up the fat content. Or a bit of heavy cream in it would bring it to a high enough fat level.


3

Since MSG was explicitly asked about too: Many asian grocers do carry the original Ajinomoto brand MSG, usually comes in transparent plastic bags with red printing on it. Also look there for food-grade lye (used for making ramen and other alkaline noodles), food colorings, and sometimes flavorings. Odd gums and fillers (xanthan, inulin) can be found ...


3

The viscosity of a xanthan solution is virtually unaffected by temperatures from freezing point to boiling point of pure water and it hydrates rapidly in cold water. You don't need to let it sit on its own and the temperature doesn't matter. The viscosity of a xanthan solution lowers when whisking or stirring, a process known as shear thinning. When you ...


3

(after reading this: http://www.ncbe.reading.ac.uk/ncbe/protocols/inajam/pdf/jam01.pdf) They usually use pectinase (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pectinase) to break down pectin molecules to help mechanical filtration. They also use gelatins to help clump up particules to help mechanical filtering.


2

Besides the points made by derivative and Michael, I noticed that it helps to mix the xanthan gum first with some other dry powder and to hydrate it by mixing it at very high speeds. When I use it in a salad dressing I mix well some sugar (5 times by weight) with the xanthan before pouring it into the food processor. The sugar separates the xanthan grains ...


2

Are you measuring your xanthan gum accurately, with a scale that goes down at least to tenths of a gram? The practical range of application is about 0.05% to 0.8% of the weight of the liquid. Much above that and it will be very snotty and unpleasant. You've got to measure it quite precisely if you want reproducible results. If you need a scale for modernist ...


2

Another way basic substances are used in dough is giving them a bath in "caustic soda", as Germans do with their Laugengebäck (the most known ones outside Germany probably are the Brezels/Pretzels). It should be "Baked Baking soda" instead of "Caustic soda" Caustic soda is poisonous.


2

The emulsifiers are probably used to keep them mixed on the shelf, rather than to get them in to the mix in the first place. Traditional home made drinks such as still lemonade are intended to be mixed and served immediately, and plenty of stirring will disperse the oil in the water-based drink for long enough. Bottled drinks, whether ready to drink or ...


2

Can you tell us what the purpose of the biscuits is? If you just want hard biscuits for decoration, then do not use any fat or egg. Pretzels are hard but brittle because they have oil in them. However, I have found that using just water and flour, and maybe salt to tighten the gluten mixture, the resulting cooked dough is hard (I shallow fried thin pieces of ...


2

As pointed out by bruglesco, you can't fake proper fois gras. However, you can make a paté that's sometimes known as 'Faux Gras'. It typically includes a lot of butter (often clarified), and chicken livers. (Google 'faux gras' for recipes.) It's not quite Fois Gras, but it's not bad either.


1

There do not appear to be established replacements however "micro-encapsulated sorbic acid" is advertised as inhibiting mold without destroying yeast. http://www.bakeryandsnacks.com/Product-innovations/Microencapsulated-Sorbic-Acid-The-Winning-Formula Outside of the usual Internet echo-chamber of scary-ingredient phobia, there is no evidence or concern for ...


1

In addition to the production method you describe, there are biotechnical ways to manufacture these, some of them vegetarian/vegan, some not. If they are made by the described method from fish, they are definitely unsuitable to be called a vegetarian food, and the same applies to any food these have been intentionally added to. If made from fish only, they ...


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