26

The easiest way is rum or brandy extract. The flavor is milder, but satisfactory enough. (Rum extract is far easier to find than brandy extract.) Most brands still have some alcohol (significantly less than the real deal, but still present), so it's important to consider whether you're just avoiding the intoxicating effects or trying to completely eliminate ...


13

I'm no eggnog expert, but when I need to substitute bourbon in a recipe that calls for both bourbon and sugar, I have substituted bourbon for a mixture of maple syrup and molasses. This will be a little bit thicker than using the rum or brandy extract, but you use much less of it. It gives that nice bitter & sweet depth of flavor similar to a bourbon, ...


8

Alcohol-free vanilla extract (available in the US from Trader Joe's) is a decent substitute for the flavor you need for eggnog. To echo other answers, you could also simply make the eggnog without the spirits. I've been using Alton Brown's eggnog recipe for years, to great satisfaction, and I just leave out the 3 ounces of bourbon.


5

Yes, yeast-risen foods such as bread will contain trace quantities of ethanol. The concentration will likely be lower than that found in fresh fruit.


5

I'm no expert either, but my mother simply never added it. She used a 50/50 milk/eggnog ratio. And to this day, I like it better than adding alcohol.


3

The short answer is: it depends, on exactly how you cooked the dish, and what other ingredients are in it. In practice, for a long simmered dish, the answer is going to approach about 20% as documented in the USDA Table of Nutrient Retention Factors Release 6 under the table entry "ALC BEV,STIRRED,BKD/SIMMRD 1.5 HR". Increasing time to 2.5 hours would go ...


2

We flavor our egg nog individually. About 1/2 to 1 oz per large coffee mug full. I like store bought egg nog. We have made it before. It's expensive and requires multiple ingredients. We add nutmeg on the top. Ground nutmeg from the can works just fine.


2

I used a store bought large carton (64 oz) and 8 oz light rum. It was good and not too strong. People could add additional rum individually to their glass if they wanted stronger


2

Chronometer uses the best scientific-quality database, which is from the USDA's FoodData Central. You can find the same data at nutritiondata.self.com, which is easier to access from a desktop computer (in my opinion). The data set for 80 proof spirits is here. For all of them, bourbon included, the calories from not-alcohol is 0. All the calories in ...


2

It is easier to define the standard drink by volume as you won't have to switch between concentrations by volume (as is normal in most drinks) and grams. This is probably where your recollection of moles comes in as somewhere in this morass of units they get involved. 14 grams of alcohol is 17.7 ml so 30% alcohol (many spirits) to get to a 100% you need ...


1

There is an "easy" way to do this if you are drinking somewhere that uses fluid ounces instead of mL. I call it the "divide by 60" method. A US "standard drink" is 12 fl oz of 5%. Multiplying 12 * 0.05 gives us 0.6 fl oz of alcohol as a "standard drink". However, since we are going to be using % alcohol over and over, I find it easiest to not do the ...


1

The question provided a link to "How to determine the alcohol content of a mixed-drink?", so I'll assume you want a simpler, easier to understand answer. Consider some common drinks: 12 US fl.oz. (355 mL) bottle of 5% beer = 355×5/100 = 17.75 mL alcohol. 1½ US fl.oz (44.4 mL) shot of 40% bourbon = 44.4×40/100 = 17.76 mL alcohol. 5 US fl.oz (148 mL) glass ...


1

Just put a vanilla bean in the bottle of booze and leave it there until the booze is used up. I always have a bottle of rum with a bean it.


1

It is impossible to calculate. Alcohol is more volatile (in a chemistry sense volatility is a measurement of a substances tendency to vaporize) than water, but it doesn't disappear anywhere near as fast as many people think, especially when it's mixed in with water. You are adding the alcohol to a wide pan on high heat and stirring a lot, which is ...


1

7-up or Gingerale gives eggnog kind of a nice flavor and great mouth feel, I prefer to add Gingerale regardless of whether I add liquor or not. Happy Holidays!


1

Something like this : Fentimans's Bloom Gin & Tonic http://www.fentimans.com/drinks/pre-mixed-alcoholic-drinks There is a list here (UK oriented) https://www.goodhousekeeping.co.uk/institute/food-reviews/pre-mixed-gin-and-tonic


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