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52

According to Biological risks associated with consumption of reptile products International Journal of Food Microbiology, Volume 134, Issue 3, 15 September 2009, Pages 163-175: People are documented to have been infected with the following pathogens due to raw snake consumption: Spirometra (Vietnam is specifically mentioned) Gnathostoma ...


48

Whisk(e)y has some crazy chemistry going on inside of it, due to the complex interactions between water, alcohols, oils, esters and other compounds of various complexity. The profile of these chemicals will vary between different whiskey/whisky styles, but the overall chemistry is similar. Simple effects of dilution Adding water, or serving on the rocks, ...


32

Liqueur is essentially a flavoured distilled spirit, with the important distinction of added sugar. Vermouth is not distilled, which is why it's referred to as a fortified wine. Flavoured vodkas usually have no added sugar, and so are not classed as liqueurs. Campari uses both distilled alcohol and sugar, and so is a liqueur. Have a flow chart: And a Venn ...


25

The easiest way is rum or brandy extract. The flavor is milder, but satisfactory enough. (Rum extract is far easier to find than brandy extract.) Most brands still have some alcohol (significantly less than the real deal, but still present), so it's important to consider whether you're just avoiding the intoxicating effects or trying to completely eliminate ...


19

Cointreau is just one particular brand. You can substitute any other triple sec/orange liquor. Some may suit your tastes better than others, but there's really no reason to insist on the fanciest most well-known brands, especially since you're mixing it into cocktails. So sure, try the Meaghers, or anything else that looks promising. And when in doubt, just ...


18

It is to cool it down without dilluting it - ice cubes would melt. And yes, you could simply cool the entire bottle, but it wouldn't look that fancy. Note that some purists would wrinkle their noses and insist that whisky1 is best enjoyed at room temperature and perhaps with a small dash of spring water. 1 And I'm soooo not going into a whisky vs. whiskey ...


17

I can't give you a list with good substitutes for common dishes. First, I doubt that my common dishes are your common dishes. Second, it would be too long. If you want to substitute alcohol in a dish, you have to understand what it does in the specific recipe, and then use your imagination to think of an ingredient which will have a similar effect. Alcohol ...


16

You could, of course, create gel layers, and the determining factor in stability would be the firmness of those gels. However - and I suppose this is just a hunch - I seriously doubt that a gel firm enough to hold the weight of all the heavier layers above it (and you are asking for at least 3) would really be drinkable, unless you're aiming for the ...


15

Whiskey is quite high in alcohol, on the order of 40% by volume, and is not hospitable to pathogens growing. The flask is intended to hold liqueur, and so is made from or lined with a food safe material, such as food grade stainless steel (assuming you have one from a reputable manufacturer). So yes, it should be fine. Remember: when it was brewed, the ...


14

Vodka by definition is a flavorless distilled alcohol, retaining any of the organoleptic properties of the grain or potato could be considered as ruining the end product. Potatoes are a good source of starch, but brewers yeast has a limited ability to break down starch into usable fuel; its preferred fuel sources are relatively simple sugars like mono and ...


13

This is a kind of emulsion called the Ouzo Effect (ouzo and other aniseed drinks also do this). I won't pretend to know enough to explain it, but it's essentially down to how oils (like those in fruit skin), water, and alcohol interact when stirred or otherwise agitated. Wikipedia has an article that explains it fully.


13

I'm no eggnog expert, but when I need to substitute bourbon in a recipe that calls for both bourbon and sugar, I have substituted bourbon for a mixture of maple syrup and molasses. This will be a little bit thicker than using the rum or brandy extract, but you use much less of it. It gives that nice bitter & sweet depth of flavor similar to a bourbon, ...


12

There is no standard, it all depends on how happy you want to get, and whether you just want the flavor of the booze, or the actual effect of the alcohol. Also a factor is the kind of alcohol you want to add. Light rums, for example, have less flavor than dark rums, so you'd want to use dark rum if you want booze flavor over alcohol. As an estimate if you ...


12

White wine in tomato sauces adds: Some acidity, but tomatoes are quite acidic as well A touch of fruitiness and flavor Alcohol, which does not all cook off, which can enhance the perception of the dish due to some flavor molecules being alcohol soluble, especially in tomatoes Since you are avoiding alcohol itself, some of the options you might use are: ...


11

Ingredients: liqueur, acidity regulator (E331), emulsifier (E471), flavours (caffeine), colouring (caramel (E150b). Source: a food product inventory database The alcohol keeps the product from microbiological spoilage, the E331 (sodium Citrate) buffers the product form getting damaged by acids produced by any spoilage, and E471 (mono and diglycerides of ...


11

The majority of the alcohol evaporates during baking. McGee's On Food and Cooking says (pg 532): In making beer and wine, the carbon dioxide escapes from the fermenting liquid, and alcohol accumulates. In making bread both carbon dioxide and alcohol are trapped by the dough, and both are expelled from the dough by the heat of baking. I also found this ...


11

Please do not use a cooking wine. Those are awful. Pick a juice, any juice. I'd say cranberry. You probably don't want anything too sweet.


10

Beer bottles should be stored upright. This is to minimize contact (and hence oxidization) between the beer and bottle cap, and (for unfiltered beers) to keep any sludge on the bottom of the bottles. (How To Store Beer) Wine should be stored (mostly) on its side. This keeps the cork moist; and a dry cork can shrink and allow too much air into the wine ...


10

In November 2007 a recipe was published in Cooks Illustrated for a Foolproof Pie dough with vodka. That recipe was created by J. Kenji Lopez-Alt who was one of the chefs on America's Test Kitchen and writer for Cooks Illustrated. He has an article about the recipe here http://sweets.seriouseats.com/2011/07/the-food-lab-the-science-of-pie-how-to-make-pie-...


10

The best nonalcoholic substitution that I can think of for a ruby-style port would be pomegranate or black cherry juice, something not from concentrate. The POM brand is readily available, at least in my local market. You may want to thicken this a little to help mimic the silky texture of a port. I'd recommend starting with about 12 liquid oz, bringing ...


10

The optimum amount of time depends on what you want to achieve: If you aim for alcohol-infused fruit, you should be fine with a short time. The taste of the fruit will start to change after only a few hours (think of soaking fruit for a punch), from then the extraction of fruit flavours into the alcohol continues. For this approach, choose a liquor that ...


9

This answer is specific to scotch whisky. In the process of making scotch whisky, distillers traditionally burn bales of dried peat moss to stop the the barley. The peat smoke produces "phenolic" compounds which give the scotch its smokey flavor. That's why smoky scotches are also called "peaty" (or have "high phenols" or "high PPM"). Phenols are highly ...


9

I recently had exactly the same challenge with Lasagna Bolognese. I substituted white balsamic vinegar diluted 50/50 with water for the wine. The final sauce was actually superior to the sauce I had just made a few days prior with the same recipe but using wine.


9

You might have better luck if you use ice that is composed of margarita ingredients (lime juice and water, I guess). Unless you're referring to margaritas on the rocks, many restaurants actually have something akin to a slushy machine that is used for margaritas, so there is no ice added to the drinks. Instead, the actual margarita ingredients are frozen ...


9

EDIT: My original version of this answer came from my incomplete recollection of a chapter in Kevin Liu's Craft Cocktails at Home on flavor balancing. Now that I have the book in front of me again, I'm adding more relevant detail and revising the parts I got wrong. In all fairness, salient points are already covered in other answers, but I think the ...


9

No, it won't help you at all. Your vegetables aren't being eaten by bacteria or similar (and this is a good thing, foods which are rendered unsafe by bacteria shouldn't be kept more than 4 hours at room temperature). They are simply wilting. There is no way to stop the wilting process. It is the plant cells dying off and stopping being able to "take care ...


9

In my experience, there are many factors at play. Proof Higher-proof results in faster infusion. I once did strawberries in 150 proof vodka with sugar and it was intensely infused within weeks, and never really dramatically changed after that. However, you may need to dilute the product substantially to get something drinkable. (I almost always used the ...


9

One of the first things you'll need to consider is that the creme de cacao is already chocolate-flavored. Vodka is very clean and neutrally flavored, so if you use it to make an extract you'll get a very pure flavor extraction from whatever you're infusing. If you use something that's flavored already, the end result will obviously contain those flavors too. ...


9

Yes. In recipes like bouillabaisse, Pernod, Ouzo, Sambuca, or Ricard would all work as substitutes. Basically, almost any anise-flavored liqueur will work, although you might steer clear of high-alchohol ones like Raki. If your local liquor selection is really poor, then maybe either skip it entirely, or add 1/4 tsp ground anise seed to the recipe and ...


8

After a long and frustrating search for wine substitutes, I finally got the guts to create "wine bouillon" and it's producing good results in the kitchen. Essentially, I've flash-dried wine into a powder that contains zero alcohol, no salt or preservatives...and all the flavor of wine. I'm calling it The Dry Gourmet. We've produced a red and a white. (...


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