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17

The rule of thumb when spiking a ganache is to either reduce the cream by the same amount or add double the amount of chocolate (by weight). So for one ounce of alcohol you either leave out one ounce of cream or add another two ounces of chocolate. That said, yours is a slightly lighter ganache than the usual 1 part cream / 2 parts chocolate and a slight ...


7

Cocktail historian David Wondrich discusses this very topic in his book "Imbibe!", pages 74-75. (It's structured around Jerry Thomas' first cocktail books—perhaps it's in one of those you're seeing the spirit referenced?) The references are indeed to places of origin, but there are qualitative differences as well. Modern designations like "...


6

You shouldn't have to open it. That's a slow-pouring cap, you should just be able to pour out of it. If you can't, that's because it's broken somehow.


5

The factors that decide what starts the party as you say are the starter and the environment. The yeast and bacteria are already present. If one of them is in the majority, then they'll get a head start without any intervention. It's just survival of the fittest. But for the most part, fermenters intervene. We add starter cultures for one, and we control the ...


5

It really depends on what sort of end result you're trying to get. If you don't reduce the alcohol before injecting it, you're going to end up with boozy pork. If this is what you want, go for it. Otherwise, reduce the alcohol, mix in the apple juice, and then inject that. You could also try flaming the alcohol, which won't cook off as much alcohol, but ...


4

It depends on how much you're going to use and for which application. Almond extract is basically bitter almond oil cut with something - alcohol and water for the alcohol extract, other neutral-flavored oil (in your case, canola / rapeseed), or water and glycerin (like this one) The main issue with the oil based version is that it is... well, oil. So it ...


4

So the sugar is most likely dissolved in equal parts in the water and ethanol, while that fat is dissolved completely in the alcohol. The most likely reason why your drink solidified would be in my opinion that it was a bit warmer while blending because of the friction so the fats partially melted, which also helped the dissolving into the alcohol process ...


3

I'd google "virgin cocktails" or "mocktails" There are more and more non alcoholic recipes out there. Most mocktails are variations on regular cocktails, using different juices and aromatics or bitters to simulate the alcohol taste and flavors For example, a virgin pina colada more or less just omit the rhum.


3

This is borderline too broad as there's many ways alcohol can be used in cooking, but in reality preparation method doesn't actually make much difference, alcohol doesn't cook off nearly as quickly as people seem to think so it's good practice to expect there will be almost as much alcohol in the end dish as you put in. Some techniques like flambe will burn ...


2

The alcohol does indeed change the coagulation of the egg yolks, so you have to be wary. Small amounts are not problematic (I have made orange crème brûlée with a tablespoon or two of orange liqueur to a full batch), but if you want more for taste reasons, you should look closer at the recipe. I tried looking this up, but couldn't find an upper limit on the ...


2

Here's a (slightly abridged) translation of the recipe you found: (i) Select clean and fresh duck eggs with even shells.(ii) Other ingredients: glutinous (sticky) rice, wine lees, salt, brown sugar etc. (i) Soak the glutinous rice in water - 24 hours at 12C, an hour less for every 2C increase in temperature.(ii) Drain and rinse the rice. Steam for 10 ...


2

You don't need to use alcohol when cooking food, there are multiple alternatives that you can use to replace it for most recipes. There are recipes that need alcohol (for example baba au rhum) and would be different when using substitutes. If you want to use alcohol when cooking, use good quality alcohol (that you would drink) it does not need to be ...


1

I wouldn't expect the alcohol level to change much, but it will change some. Gin and other liquors are actually mostly water, or at least a significant percentage will be water. Typically gin is somewhere around 60% water and 40% alcohol, any flavorings are trace elements. Prunes are dried so they aren't going to contribute moisture to the gin, they will ...


1

Assuming that the container you have them in is tightly sealed then the total amount of alcohol in the container will be the same. However, the concentration in the liquid will have changed somewhat, how much depends on how many prunes you put in relative to how much gin. Basically what happens is that the fruit absorb some of the alcohol and water from the ...


1

Alcohols exhibit rapid broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against vegetative bacteria, fermentation is the chemical breakdown of a substance by bacteria, yeasts, or other microorganisms, typically involving effervescence and the giving off of heat. You are not fermenting with vinegar or alcohol, you are pickling and preserving though, but you need to ...


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