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9

Generally lowfat sauces use tricks to get texture and some semblance of flavour. Starches and thickeners give the illusion of richness, while vast quantities of salt somewhat mask the lack of cheese and butter. Anyone with half a palette can tell at first taste though. Make it seldom, but make it properly.


5

Please do see the excellent answer to the Cacio e Pepe question, which applies to your future efforts. The recipe you link to is just bad, which is why it's not working for you. Boiling the butter and cheese in the pasta water is wrong, and will always result in clumps of stringy cheese. So the answer is to not use that recipe. The tradition for all ...


5

This is an old question, but for the sake of completeness: Parmesan, even the high-end stuff, really doesn't melt well. I've found that in any sauce containing it, it's got to be grated as finely as possible, or you get little globules of it that won't ever dissolve. That's tough to do with pre-grated Kraft cheese, but if you can find a good price on block ...


4

The longer the cheese has aged, the better cooking quality, that's why Italian restaurants, at least the decent ones only use Reggiano to cook with. Things like Grano or less expensive cheese should be used as garnish. You need to take the cooked pasta, add it to the cream over high, until it is almost reduced to what you want, pull it off the heat, add a ...


4

Throw out the low-fat sauce. Make alfredo. Alfredo is a very, very simple sauce at its heart. Most recipes consist essentially only of two or three ingredients such as cream, butter, and parmesan, perhaps with some garlic or pepper. So if you don't have low-fat restrictions, don't use a low fat version as a base. Just make the sauce from your recipe ...


3

This is almost certainly due to cooling. Serving on heated plates will buy you some time. If (at home) you use microwave plate warmers you can place them under the plates after you've used them and the residual heat will keep the plates hot. You need to strike a balance as you don't want it to cook too much after serving. Cream thickens on cooking (unlike ...


3

The thickening agent in your recipe is flour. If you want to have thinner sauce then you need to add less flour when cooking the garlic. If a total of 6 to 7.5 Tbsp of flour is too much then maybe you should try adding a total of 4 Tbsp.


3

The best way to freeze something is to do it fast. Chill the food first in the refrigerator before putting it in the freezer. Keeping the food thin/flat rather than thick will help the center to chill faster. Loading up a sheet pan with individual portions works well for this - just be sure you have room for it in the refrigerator and freezer. However, ...


3

You don't say how you prepare the sauce, and Alfredo does not contain mushrooms (or flour, or onions). But if you are simply pureeing button mushrooms, then no, there is no way to make it any other color. The mushrooms have black gills, and they will color the whole white sauce. In theory, you could try removing the gills from button mushrooms before ...


2

Reduce the liquid first before adding the cheese. My favorite recipe is to reduce heavy cream by half and then add in plenty of grated Parmesan. Some people add Romano, butter, and/or nutmeg as well.


2

Try brightening the flavor by using herbs and flavors that go well with a cream base. Use your low fat sauce as the creamy background to highlight fresh chives, basil or lemon zest - or all three. Try adding sautéed mushrooms to the recipe if they're not already in it or top the dish with a light drizzle of truffle oil. And Aleppo pepper is a fabulous way ...


2

In my training as a chef, I have learned that there is no Alfredo with cream in Italy. The closest approximation is just butter and cheese with some added pasta water to thin it out.


2

I love the commercials for emulsifiers as an accepted answer... no one has answered this question! Also many people have issues with lechitins and additives, but that is for another thread. You have a microwave and let's say a bowl of Alfredo sauce with a flour thickened roux, your microwave cannot perform at 10% power it just runs at 100% power 10% of the ...


2

As stated above, it only takes a cup of cheese per half quart of heavy cream. That makes a lot of sauce. Gratting it yourself is the best way. Be sure to use the long grating side of your grater. One wants to have the bigger shreedds, it makes for creamer melting and better blending. You kinda have to plan a little a head. Once you grate the chesse, for best ...


2

Ricotta is not supposed to melt, or dissolve, or anything like that. It is made up of protein clumps. The only way it can appear very smooth is if the manufacturer created a cheese where the clumps have been made very tiny mechanically - because chemically, they are still clumps and stay that way after heating. You said that you changed brands. There you ...


2

Some ricotta uses gums and stabilizers (usually cheaper ricottas) whereas good ricottas are made with just milk and a bit of acid and a bit of salt. The stabilizers and gums allow the ricotta to hold water rather than proper draining done for better ricottas. The stabilized ricottas often leave a grainy texture after cooking (since the stabilizers don't hold ...


1

What I have done to not get the gray colour is: Fry your button mushrooms in butter, until soft adding a bit of salt and pepper. make a BĂ©chamelsauce with butter (1 Tablespoon),flour (1 Tablespoon) and milk (1 Cup) Once your sauce is done, take it off the stove and stir/fold in the mushrooms Depending on the amount of butter you used for the mushrooms you ...


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