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16

The most widely-accepted substitute seems to be various sauces made from mushrooms. I don't want to say "mushroom sauce" because most products don't have that exact name. For example: Here you have "Vegetarian Mushroom Flavored Stir-Fry Sauce" on the left, and "Premium Shitake Mushroom Flavored Soy Sauce" on the right. I'm actually not familiar with the one ...


15

I think this question would be more suited for Biology beta, but since it's here, I'll try to keep the answer as lay as possible. Albumin, like you read on Wikipedia, is a large group of proteins, which are present in all kinds of organisms, including your own blood. (Actually, albumin in your blood has a very important function - it binds small molecules, ...


13

The perfect solution to you - Use the Indian spice called "Asafoetida" or "Hing". It gives a taste which is very much like Onion and Garlic - In fact, stricter practitioners of Hinduism are not allowed to eat onion and garlic (as supposedly they cause mental agitation). Thus, traditional Hindu (Vedic) cooking uses Asafoetida as a subsitute for onion in ...


10

You are not going to find anything outside the chili family that gives quite the same flavor, so substituting flavor-wise is not going to be possible. Note that paprika is a spice ground from particular pepper, so if you are allergic to all capsicum peppers, you don't want to use it. What you can do is build other flavorful combinations which you enjoy and ...


10

Based on the information you've given, it sounds like what you're describing is not technically an allergy but histamine intolerance. In an allergic reaction, histamines are produced by the body as part of an immune reaction. Histamine intolerance is due to an underproduction of the enzyme that normally breaks down histamine. This means that foods that ...


10

No, peanuts are not nuts in the botanical sense. They are legumes, much like peas or beans. Chestnuts and acorns are examples of true nuts. Most of what we commonly refer to as nuts are botanically drupes, including walnuts, almonds and cherries, as well as some larger fruits like peaches (which are typically eaten for their flesh, rather than their seed)....


9

Try Caraway as a substitute for Cumin. It has a similar flavour profile, just a little more intense. Some people prefer the flavour of Caraway and use it in all their recipes instead of Cumin. I cannot tell you if you will be allergic to this herb, just like I don't know if you'll be allergic to any other herb because you'r allergic to cumin. Caraway comes ...


9

Step 1 should always be to ask which ingredients exactly you need to stay clear of, just in case it's more than nuts. My - possibly naïve - assumption would be that basic recipes that stick to flour, sugar, eggs, butter and possibly dairy should probably be ok. Chocolate could be dangerous as the factories often use nuts as well, so there is a risk of ...


8

Almond milk, rice milk, soy milk, coconut milk (but not the kind from the can, something like So Delicious or Silk brand sells), hemp milk, oat milk, or many other nut or grain based milks will work.


8

I share your allergy and have for some time. First - I'm very sorry, it's not a fun one to have. Second - there are a lot of spices you can use that give color and flavor without going into the pepper family. I have a recipe for a curry powder you can use: 2 tablespoons whole cumin seeds, toasted 2 tablespoons whole cardamom seeds, toasted 2 tablespoons ...


8

As ChrisH said in the comments, probably all that matters is that the milk is a liquid. If the end result is supposed to be something solid, there can't possibly be that much milk in there, and the fat and flavor of the milk are pretty small compared to the meat. So, just use another liquid. If you're not worried about flavor, water would work. Stock/broth ...


7

AFAIK, (which isn't much) there is no one good substitute for eggs in baking. This is because the egg can be there for one or more of several reasons. This includes as a flavorant, emulsifier, moisturizer and leavener. So, I'll address each of these separately. Flavor - I have yet to find an ingredient or ester I can easily produce to replicate the very ...


7

If you want to cast a wide net, searching for gluten-free bread might be your best here, even though is a wheat allergy rather than gluten intolerance, since removing the gluten necessarily means removing the wheat. Soy isn't too common an ingredient in breads so you should still be okay. And yes, you can make plenty of kinds of gluten-free bread at home, ...


7

I have spent decades cooking for people who can't have gluten, and I and several other people can't have shrimp. The simplest thing to do is to make everyone's food meet the needs of the allergic person. So for example don't bread anyone's chicken, or make a single gluten-free gravy. That's the simplest, but it may not meet your other needs. In that case, ...


6

Sourdough starter will grow mold if it starts going "off". If it's healthy, it will naturally prevent mold from growing, but if you forget to feed it for too long and/or the container it is in is dirty, it can start growing fuzzy stuff. Feed your culture regularly, and transfer it into a clean container now and then, and it will be fine.


6

Recipes for which you can substitute margarine for butter can have non-dairy margarines substituted instead - you have to check the ingredients list, most margarines contain milk solids. Here in Australia, my dairy free friends and I use Nuttelex, but that's not available in the USA.


6

Ironically, one of the many milk alternatives for lactose intolerant people is "oat milk", which is made by soaking oats in water, and retaining the resulting liquor. Many traditional porridge / oatmeal recipes are made with just oats and water. Oats themselves have a somewhat "creamy" flavour, and remember your lactose-intolerant residents will not have a ...


6

Galangal root is a possibility (more info). It's sort of like ginger that's been kicked up a notch on the hot/spicy axis. Chinese, Vietnamese and Thai stores will have it. There's also a powdered form available online. I've never tried that, but maybe it doesn't suffer the same terrible fate as powdered ginger. Prickly ash (Sichuan pepper) and Japanese ...


6

Everybody has different rules for what pregnant women should and should not eat, and you definitely should clarify with the individual. Usually the concern with cheese is over bacteria. The typical rule about cheese is to avoid softer, raw milk cheeses for fear of listeria, which can affect the baby. There is more information here: http://...


6

Try black bean sauce. The body and color of the sauce is similar, though there are coarse bits of bean in it (where oyster sauce is usually smooth). Add a shake of fish sauce to taste. Fish sauce alone may be too thin. Most fish sauces are fermented anchovies with added salt (and maybe sugar). I just taste tested this (have all the ingredients) and ...


6

Normally, there are no ingredients shared between butter and mayonnaise. The only ingredient in butter is milk, either fresh or cultured. The ingredients of mayonnaise are egg yolks, vegetable oil, mustard, water and acid. As you can see, there is nothing in common between the two. There are two exceptions when they may share something. First, you can ...


6

The difference between gluten and gliadin is the one already explained in your question: Gliadin is a precursor to gluten. You could say that gliadin is to gluten what grains are to porridge. Gluten is the result of glutenin reacting with gliadin in the presence of water, just like porridge is the result of grains "reacting" with milk in the presence of heat....


6

If you want to closely replicate the water/fat/sugar content of milk, you can use the following (originally from this other question): 200 mL water 2 tsp pure fat (e.g., cooking oil) 1 tbsp sugar That will produce the equivalent of 1 cup of whole milk. You can substitute the water for some other flavorful liquid (e.g., stock or juice), but you will need ...


6

If you are not allergic to citric acid you can use it as a substitute for lemon juice in canning. Related Can I use citric acid instead of lemon juice when canning?


5

Surimi, sold as imitation crab and sometimes shaped to look like chunks of lobster or even whole shrimp, can be a great substitute for shellfish in a number of recipes, but be aware that, if choosing it for reasons of allergy, many brands actually contain some crabmeat. There is a kosher surimi available, marketed under the dyna-sea brand, that is absolutely ...


5

I too have tried lots of things, including Ener-G Egg Replacer; and yuk. However, I have successfully made brownies for my daughter who has an egg and nut allergy. To replace the egg, in addition top your ingredients, add 1/2 teapoon baking powder, then mix 15g potato flour and 150ml water over a gentle heat until it just thickens and is clear remove from ...


5

It's very likely that someone allergic to pine nuts would also be allergic to walnuts and almonds (I am allergic to all of them, cashews, too). I have used unsalted sunflower seeds, but most of the time I leave the pine nuts out and add more cheese or bread crumbs :)


5

One of my favourite ice creams involves fresh strawberries (just picked), cream, and sugar. That's all. It can be hard finding "recipes" for things that are simple, so when you search for recipes you get all kinds involving you making a custard first and so on. If you've made eggless icecream and don't like something about it, that's one thing, but my guess ...


5

In general lard can always be substituted for butter, but you will not get the same flavour, obviously. Lard is perhaps a bit more 'savoury' than butter, so it may be worth trying a pie out just to see if it works with a sweet filling. You should be able to convert straight from butter to lard. Another alternative is vegetable shortening, which you can use ...


5

I agree with the people who say it depends on the recipe. I'm going to expand a little on what has already been said. Tomatoes are acidic but slightly sweet, and of course add some red color and (depending on the juice) maybe some thickness to a sauce or broth. Tomatoes (and their juice) can be pretty distinctive, so you shouldn't expect any substitution ...


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