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99

One reason is simple appearance, I think - opaque white liquids or saps have long been called "milky", including nut milks, coconut milk, dandelion or milk thistle saps, and several other white substances. Nut milks get called milk because they look like milk to the eye. Another reason is that nut milks behave like milks in recipes - they are emulsions ...


31

I consider "Milk" to be the substance excreted from living being to sustain their young, whether they be human, cow, dog, etc... Therein lies your problem. Other people consider "milk" to have a wider definition than this. The Oxford English Dictionary (subscription required) gives a number of definitions of "milk" that are relevant to cooking: 1a. A ...


8

The reason honey shouldn't be kept in the fridge is that it crystallises easily at low temperatures (even that's just a change in texture, not a spoilage problem). Once mixed with plenty of water so the sugars are dissolved, that won't be an issue. I would expect the addition of what's essentially sugar to have no negative effect on the keeping properties ...


7

Your definition for the word is not sufficiently broad. After all- coconut milk is a thing and it's more like juice than almond and rice milk are. These liquids are called milk because they are milky: white, opaque, sometimes have protein and fat. Either way, they aren't much like juice. The nuts aren't just crushed. They are ground and then soaked in ...


7

I don't have a confident answer as to why it's happening. My wife uses Almond Milk and drinks it with her coffee. She's never noticed any bitterness. My first suggestion would be the coffee itself, rather than the almond milk. The way you make coffee (in a moka pot) will produce different results than at Starbucks or any other coffee shop themselves. That ...


6

The key to a smooth ganache is fat - add too much water and you will end up with a “grainy” product. There are even recipes that use butter instead of cream (full or partial substitution), and while that’s probably a heart attack on a spoon, the texture is excellent. Almond milk is at least as “watery” as regular cows milk, so yes, that’s a questionable ...


5

It's very difficult to give you any specific advice on this without really understanding what it is you're trying to achieve. To get to destination B you have to have a starting point A! What are you trying to achieve here? Have you said, hey I've got this bottle of Almond Milk I have to use up, perhaps I'll try and make a dipping sauce with it? That's a ...


5

Almond Milk for cow's milk was a really common substitution in medieval recipes. A lot of medieval recipes used almond milk - almonds being a lot easier to store without spoiling and find reliably when a medieval cook needed some. Almond milk was a staple of the medieval kitchen. It was used in a wide variety of dishes as a substitute for milk or cream, ...


4

Your best bet for this is xanthan gum, which is an excellent stabiliser. Whilst the distinction between 'natural' and 'unnatural' is fraught with difficulties, insofar as xanthan gum is a product of microbial fermentation then it is no more 'unnatural' than alcohol or vinegar. Be careful not to use too much though (unless, of course, you want your drink ...


4

I just used this recipe from Silk and they turned out perfectly. (I am not affiliated with Silk, I was just looking for a substitution which is how I stumbled upon this site and your question) 1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour or whole wheat pastry flour 1-2 Tbsp sugar or honey 2 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp salt 1 cup Silk almondmilk, any flavor but ...


4

It's called "milk" because that is what it most resembles in taste, texture and appearance, and it is also used as a substitute for people who can't or don't want to drink traditional cow's milk. The choice of what they call it is strictly a product marketing decision, so strict scientific accuracy is not a consideration. What a biologist might refer to as ...


3

In the US, most almonds are already pasteurized, even when they are listed as "raw". One of the methods is to steam blast the nuts, which heats up the outside of the almond to 205°F (96°C). However, this process is mostly done because of Salmonella concerns, rather than the yeasts and microbes that cause the souring of the milk. You could do something ...


3

@Megha's answer is the one. I'll add some experience context. Most often you can substitute, but not all the time. Example from experience: I tried Almond Milk with one of those packaged Instant Pudding mixes from the market. No matter what I did, it would not thicken. I ended up drinking it as a vanilla milk, which if I wanted one of those I could have ...


3

I will disagree with Johanna here. While hers sounds like a reasonable definition, it is not how the word is used in practice. Milk is A) Cow's (also goat's, sheep's, camel's and mare's) lactated fluid, or B) Any liquid which kinda looks like A), doesn't have an overly strong taste, and there is a convention of being called a milk. It can in many cases ...


2

I think that both will do the purpose you are looking for. The soaking is more to bring the nutrients out of the almond before preparing the dish you need them for or in this case the milk. I would try just the soaking once and if you want it more sweet then bitter add the sugar into the water you are soaking it in, this might neutralize the bitterness in ...


2

I've read that the almond milk can taste bitter if it is burned. If you microwave the milk, you should do so on a low setting. See https://www.quora.com/Could-almond-milk-be-boiled


2

Actually, almond milk in coffee always tastes bitter to me, even when the black coffee is wonderful without a trace of bitterness. I believe there is a chemical change in the mixture. However, since not many people sense this, I wonder if it is also individual taste perception. I have only tried commercial almond milk, so I am going to try making it and see ...


2

Baking soda reacts with acid to create CO2 and lift. Baking powder already has the necessary acid included. Cow's milk is slightly acidic. Almond milk is slightly alkaline. It may be that there is just a little bit less of the necessary acid to make your leavening react. Experiment adding a little acid. Cream of tartar would be nice because it wouldn't ...


2

To make your life easier, I'd look for another muffin recipe that does not use almond milk. You should be able to substitute with rice milk, soy milk.. or even regular milk (cow, sheep ...) or other non animal milk. For example, this site tested muffins with different kind of milks. https://teaspoonofspice.com/almond-milk-muffins/


1

Hmm....depending on the water-to-almond-solids ratio of the almond milk, it might never reach the whipped cream texture. I think you're better off with coconut cream.


1

My wife is lactose intolerant and doesn't particularly care for almond milk. I have successfully used Cashew Milk in everything from cereal to most baking recipes (where almond milk will work)


1

Just use water instead, or regular cow milk.


1

Generally, we soak grains and pulses then throw away the soaking water. If we didn’t it would likely turn sour in a few days. Also soaking helps remove some of the phytic acid, therefore unlocking more nutrients. I suspect the phytic acid will be in the soaking water which we flush away. Phytic acid prevents absorption of a number of minerals.


1

This question has two facades: First get rid of the already-there spoilage microorganisms. Before blending the nuts, I soak them in vinegar for a while and rinse thoroughly. And always using sanitized equipment and boiling the water (and sugar if you're adding) is quite a good practice to kill the microorganisms you might have in your ingredients. Prevent ...


1

You can purchase soy lecithin from good cooking suppliers or online, about 0.5% lecithin by volume of fat will emulsify it well. Many soy lecithins are not GMO free I have not tried soy lecithin with almond milk, but it works for soy milk For an alternative, try sunflower lecithin, usually available in health food/supplement shops. It is more likely to be ...


1

You can add things like lecithin or flax seeds to help keep your milk emulsified, but it will still probably separate in hot liquid. To prevent that, you might try to add something fattier to your milk, like coconut.


1

Note there are specific European Union regulations that define the terms "milk" and "dairy". This article from the Food Standards Agency (UK) summarises this: Guidance On Legislation On The Protection Of Definitions And Designations In Respect Of Milk And Milk Products Specifically it says: The terms ‘dairy’ and ‘milk and milk products’ are used ...


1

It is a little difficult to answer your question about whether or not almond milk can be used as a dipping sauce base. Sure, it could be used as a base. But what were you looking to make? If you are looking to make something like a creamy sauce with a non-dairy milk alternative, almond milk is a good replacement for the dairy you would use. However, if you ...


1

I used leftover "unsweetened" almond milk just now, to make griddlecakes using a Fanny Farmer recipe that our family has enjoyed for years. Recipes mentioned above are almost identical. I happened on this website while eating said pancakes, seeking more information about the use of almond milk. I figured that, like buttermilk, I should add about 1/4 ...


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