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37

There is nothing special about the combination, you seem to have stumbled over a case of confirmation bias :) Here I made a table with examples. The table is by no means complete, it contains the first things that came up in my head. As you see, all other combinations of whole eggs or egg yolks work with almonds, other nuts, or no nuts at all. If the ...


33

They are covered by mold, a type of fungus. What has happened is, mold loves moisture and when you closed the lid on almonds which had a good amount of moisture in them, the mold had the right conditions to grow. Note: You should discard them all. And next time, you'd like to have soaked almonds, it's better to keep them in the fridge at all times, as @...


24

There is no general replacement. Almond flour has very little in common with all-purpose flour, and behaves very differently in baking. Your idea of adding gluten is very interesting - many flourless recipes are actually made with the intent to be gluten-free, which is a very difficult restriction to work around. It is certainly something to have in your ...


13

In addition to totally lacking gluten, almond flour contains way more fat than AP flour, around 50 times as much. That's another reason it's popular in vegan/gf baking, it adds plant-based fat. So you will need to cut down on the fat elsewhere in the recipe. You will also need to adjust your expectations of what the finished product will be like. I suggest ...


10

I made bacon😃 Mixed together 2 tablespoons oil, 3 tbs soy sauce or tamari, 2 tbs nutritional yeast, 1 tbs woostershire, 1/2 tbs maple syrup, 3/4 tbs hot paprika in a bowl. Mix in 3 cups loose Almond skins. Bake 375 for approx 20 minutes on non stick surface until crispy. BLT waiting to happen. Or use as bacon bits on salad...


7

My personal choice would be to throw this away just because I'm too squeamish. But people here use salty water to get rid of larvae from wild mushrooms. The idea is to soak the unprocessed mushrooms containing living insects, which will try to escape and eventually die outside the mushroom. You then rinse couple of times with fresh water and dry it to avoid ...


7

As Stephie implied, after "a couple years", I'd bet your raw almonds are rancid and whatever you do with them would just be throwing good ingredients after bad. But eat a couple and see for yourself. If they're ok, I'd make almond butter, that would let you use all of them quickly.


7

According to a representative from a company that makes it, it's packaged with the words “make your own almond bark". So "almond bark" (the coating) is a key ingredient in "almond bark" (the candy with almonds). Over time, according to the representative, the ingredient became called with the same name as the candy.


7

I don't think you are doing anything wrong, some almond shells can be notoriously hard, depending on the species. Maybe you are used to having soft shell almonds and your trees produce some hard shell variety. Soft Shell Almonds Hard Shell Almonds Make sure they are ripe and dry enough (no fresh pulp around it), greener shells are generally slightly ...


7

Adding to @rumtscho's excellent answer, you can in fact substitute almond flour with hazelnut or walnut flour (those are the ones I've tried) in macarons and still end up with a very similar result. Almonds are the traditional one to use, but there is nothing magical about almonds specifically.


6

Some things that are made almost entirely of almonds (plus elbow grease), and thus will use up a large quantity of almonds: Almond butter (need to add: nothing. Well, salt, if you like.) Almond milk (need to add: water) And then there are more dessert recipes than you can shake a stick at, but they take increasing amounts of other ingredients, and thus ...


6

A basic Google search hit on numerous sites all which agree that almond paste can be frozen with no deterioration of the product. The key is to wrap it up in several layers of plastic bags or plastic, then aluminum foil to keep out other flavors from the freezer as my experience has been that ground nuts will absorb odors if improperly wrapped. Once in ...


6

During blending, air is put into the milk mixture. Once you switch it off, not all air is kept inside the milk but makes it's way to the surface. These are the bubbles that make you think your milk is fizzy. Without being a chemist I assume full fat milk has more fat, therefore the emulsion is somewhat "thicker" and thus can hold the air better. There are ...


5

I found these slides that may help. The information is a difficult to interpret, but the page with conclusions says that the optimal roast uses the lowest possible temperature for 20 to 30 minutes. This however is information for the food industry and it is clearly geared towards increasing shelf-life which you are probably not too concerned about. If you ...


5

If you are already seeing larvae dust, the nuts are already nibbled by the larvae, you cannot undo that :( but if you don't mind sharing your food with them, or chomping on the occasional worm, you could try killing them. I've heard of people using deep freeze. It should kill at least all larvae. The eggs are probably somewhat hardier, but as far as I know,...


5

I only have an answer for your first question: How does the food industry detect the bitter almonds? They don't need to. According to Wikipedia, bitter almonds come from bitter almond trees, and "sweet" almonds from that variety, so if you plant only "sweet" almond trees in your orchard, you don't need to sort through your almonds rejecting the bitter ones. ...


4

Your best bet for this is xanthan gum, which is an excellent stabiliser. Whilst the distinction between 'natural' and 'unnatural' is fraught with difficulties, insofar as xanthan gum is a product of microbial fermentation then it is no more 'unnatural' than alcohol or vinegar. Be careful not to use too much though (unless, of course, you want your drink ...


4

If they truly are rancid, then you should just discard them. Any use of the almonds or their oil will just impart a terrible taste into the dish in which they are used. If they have gone sour (I am not sure how that would be possible), then something is very wrong, perhaps an unusual type of spoilage, and similarly you should just discard them for safety ...


4

I'm not an expert on candy-making, but it sounds to me as if you didn't heat the sugar sufficiently. The temperature that the sugar reaches will affect the texture when it cools: https://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/candy/sugar-stages.html I'd attempt to heat it back up to hard-crack state (300°F), and see if I could recover it. Being that I don't have ...


4

That's the trick to getting spices to adhere to nuts. If you are worried about the messiness perhaps your method can be improved. Put your nuts into a tossing bowl and slowly drizzle the oil over them. If tossing is a technique you are skilled with you can do that, but I'm guessing it's not, in which case you can stir with a spoon. It won't take much oil, ...


4

So an analysis of the original recipe gives the following (I've omitted baking soda & salt for brevity): 2 cups AP flour 100.00% 250.0 g ½ cup sugar 24.00% 60.0 g 80 grams butter 32.00% 80.0 g 1 egg 20.00% 50.0 g 3 Tbsp milk 18.40% 46.0 g water(b:13g,e:38g,m:40.3g) 36....


3

I use a Cuisinart food processor to make almond butter. I once used a processor that was not very powerful and it burnt out (my brothers, so I had to replace it). You'll need a machine with significant wattage because it takes a bit of energy to grind up almonds unless you are making a very small quantity. Sorry, I don't think there is a way around that. The ...


3

I imagine the argument for almonds roasted at lower temperatures relates to the notion that roasting at higher temperatures would change the chemical structure of the oils and others in the nut. This is a pretty common notion like with cold pressed oils vs. oils that have been heated through its processing. http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-cold-pressed-oil....


3

They're really thin, so it's a really small amount of food. I wouldn't feel at all guilty about pitching them, but if you do want to use them, that means the main way it'll really matter is if you use them for texture or appearance. But usually we do the opposite: remove the skins from nuts to make something with a smooth texture and uniform color. So I don'...


3

I think it most likely that the methods you describe are theoretically possible, but risky and not particularly cost-effective. Whatever the mechanism that could be used to render the almonds safe for consumption, it seems difficult to confirm this in a home preparation, leaving you with some potential (even if small) that they'll still produce some cyanide ...


3

I wouldnt't do a starch-based "paste" (it will be a pudding) because it will have a completely wrong texture, way too creamy. My first choice would be a bean paste. Make it with white beans instead of azuki to get a color more suggestive of marzipan, and add more sugar than usual to distract from the bean taste. A close second, if this is compatible with ...


3

I make a nut free frangipane using rice flour in place of almond meal. I think a mix of this with egg, sugar and butter would work. The rice flour has the same slightly gritty texture and doesn't add gluten to the mix.


3

Yes, roast the almonds. Be careful not to burn them. You can roast them in a dry skillet, tossing them frequently until aromatic and slightly darkened, or in the oven for maybe 25 minutes at 200°F (95°C).


2

Call the company directly and ask. I do that with all my foods (I live without a refeigerator). I met people who never refrigerate mayonaisse and lived to tell. Turns out you don't need to if you don't introduce any other food particles into it! Now I never refrigerate mayo, or many other foods and condiments. So it pays to call the company and insist on the ...


2

I used up a pot full of almond water because I refused to throw all that good stuff away. I first drank it cold from the fridge when I got thirsty :) It's an interesting mild flavor, but it might take some getting used to. I used some more to make an apple drink (crush apples in blender, slowly add this water to it until you get the desired consistency). I ...


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