21

This is an interesting question. Personally I would throw it out, the discoloration and resulting taste are the result of a chemical reaction with the pan. The brownish discoloration is a sign that the Aluminium (Al, the chemical symbol for the element from here on), is being attacked by a chemical reaction. This is most likely by an acid, though salts can ...


18

Aluminum cookware is "reactive", as opposed to "non-reactive" cookware like glass or stainless steel. When cooking acidic ingredients, a reaction occurs that can discolor food and sometimes leave a taste of tin. It would appear that the rum cake in question was acidic enough to cause this reaction. While I have yet to come across anything that says this is ...


8

I wouldn't risk it. Aluminum melts at 660°C and a gas flame is much hotter than that. Of course, the heat dissipates rapidly when you go away from a small flame, but these disposable pans are awfully thin and can quickly heat a lot. They are meant for the oven, which practically never exceeds 300°C. If you really have no pan to melt it in think of some ...


7

My guess is carbon steel. It's used in a variety of cooking implements, including stuff like woks and as bread pans. A quick search suggests that carbon steel is often magnetic as you report. If it is indeed carbon steel, it benefits from seasoning and ongoing love and care similar to cast iron (lest it rust or deteriorate). Many articles on this, such as ...


6

Butter melts at such a low temp that this would work. You would want as low a flame as you can. I would not recommend it, however. If you forget it the metal is thin enough to burn through and at least make a mess- worst case it will ignite the butter, atomize the aluminum which will unverifiably hasten the onset of Alzheimer's, and burn your house to the ...


6

It is unlikely but possible that it is unsafe to eat. This study of aluminum leaching from pans during cooking of acidic liquids (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1397396) showed a levels as high as about 50mg/kg. Let's assume your cake is about 1kg, so 50mg aluminum. The European Food Safety guideline for aluminum according to this paper (https://www....


5

Aluminum isn't exactly toxic or harmful to the same degree as lead, but it's not exactly good for you either. And as you've identified, aluminum is fairly reactive. Higher acidity, salinity, and cooking time will all contribute to further reaction and absorption in any aluminum cooking vessel (or utensils for that matter). This is an issue for three ...


4

This will be from an electrochemical reaction between the can (mostly iron I think) and the water and possibly the aluminum (a better chemist than me would be able to tell you). Aluminum has a fairly impermeable mono-molecular oxide layer on its surface (incidentally this is why you can color coke cans and the like; the color is in the oxide layer). The ...


4

What you've got there, is a Moka pot. They are unable to produce the amount of pressure that gives the Espresso its character, in particular the crema. I have owned several, and all of them have had this happen. That has had no impact on the flavour or mouth feel.


4

I tried seasoning an aluminium kawali and was pretty successful doing this. I cleaned it very well and then layered it with a bit of oil (use peanut or canola) and then baked it outside on the bbq (or oven) for 30mins each time and then reapplying oil when it’s cooled down to touch. Important and ensure your kawali is upside down when baking and remove any ...


3

Wow, I am going to say no. I haven't research it that mush but my guess is it is a bad idea. Aluminum pans are cheap, I would just pick up a new one. But to really answer your question. I don't really think you will be able to season an aluminum pan. I have a couple that I saute and pan fry with all the time that, even if I wasn't trying to ...


3

Bundt pans (and cake pans in general) are not normally seasoned in any way. Instead, they are greased and floured each time you make a cake. The traditional method is to apply butter or oil to the interior (the easiest way is melted butter and a pastry brush, but you can also use wax paper or even clean fingers to apply solid butter). Then you flour it ...


3

Yes, cast aluminum should be seasoned. Here are some instructions from cookingforengineers.com: How Do I Season It? Wash the cookware with hot soapy water. Dry it and then coat it thoroughly with vegetable oil. The easiest way is to pour the oil onto a paper towel and work it well into all the surfaces. Put the well-coated cookware into a 250 degree oven ...


3

Simply put, your oil isn't hot enough. If you add vegetables to cold oil in a cold pan and then heat everything up, your veggies (or just about anything else) will soak up the oil. Heat the oil in the pan until it starts to shimmer and a drop of water sizzles, dances and disappears. THEN add your veggies. The very definition of "saute" comes from "to jump ...


2

This may not be the root of your particular problem, but you may be losing a significant portion of your oil due to splatter and aerosolization. If your pan splatters a lot when you initially add your vegetables, this may be part of the problem. To limit splatter, make sure the vegetables are completely dry before putting them in the oil. At a minimum, ...


2

Aluminum cleaners typically contain mild/organic acids and sometimes also contain abrasives, to help remove oxidation. The black color may very well be aluminum oxide which is a cleaning abrasive (a sensible choice for an aluminum pan cleaner). A paste is also sensible for aluminum pots because these pots require a rigorous scrubbing, compared with ceramic, ...


2

It also happens to me sometimes, what I suggest you do is spread oil uniformly on the pan and make sure you pour the egg in the middle of the pan. If the pan has oil on all sides it does not matter if you add the vegetables first or later as topping on the egg. There is also a way out, pour the egg first, adjust flame of the burner to low and add the ...


2

Steel (as used in knives) will always scratch aluminium, which is really quite a soft metal. Glass and even some plastics can mark it quite noticeably as can storing aluminium pans stacked together. In other words it happens. Don't worry about it. The pan doesn't look as nice but it's not ruined. The main reason to avoid scratching it is to avoid getting ...


1

Personally I prefer a wooden reamer. My preference is based on durability and ease of general long term maintenance. Also because it just kinda looks cool. From a standpoint of maintenance and long-term durability I would suggest the metallic press will be the better of the choices you provided. I am basing this on metal vs. plastic and the fact that the ...


1

Looks like the top apparatus gets my vote: takes care of breaking up the juice vesicles and the pressure of the top plunger helps squeeze it out. I find so many unpopped juice vesicles in my Mexican citrus press (bottom picture). Too much pressure and I get unwanted bitterness from oils of peel


1

A combo oven acts no differently in each separate mode, than they would as single separate appliances. Metal in a microwave = light show and ruined oven. Metal in convection oven is perfectly ok. Just don’t use any microwave AT ALL when cooking in any metal pan


1

Moving the vegetables around is going to disrupt the uniformity of the layer of oil on the pan, which you are going to need for something like an omelette in an aluminum pan. Or even just having the vegetables there, probably absorbing some of the oil and releasing water, is going to do the same. You will probably have to saute the vegetables separately, ...


1

My favorite pans for baking are 100% pure aluminum. You are right in that they need to be treated in order for the bread to not stick- you can grease and flour them, or as I do, line with parchment paper, which is even easier and means you have minimal cleanup. They are very lightweight, inexpensive, won't rust, and I've never had any issues with corrosion ...


1

I used to use "bakers secret" ("Grey non-stick silicone based coating" on a steel pan) but my sloth always caught up with me eventually (left too long in the sink they will rust) - once the coating is toast those are still (IME) as good as a regular steel pan of the "use lots of grease or grease and flour" variety. Quite some time ago I bit on full-silicone ...


1

This is completely normal. The pan stands between the heat source and the cake. It lets through radiation and also conducts heat at different speeds. Also the convection patterns in the oven are changed by the shape of the pan. You cannot predict which pan will speed up or slow down the baking by comparing it to another pan, because the relationships are ...


1

Looks like it's aluminum! http://www.ikea.com/ca/en/catalog/products/60149197/ I went thrifting again and found the same wok, but this one was a set with IKEA lid. Looks like I didn't get a steal afterall.


1

I inherited my mother-in-law's cast aluminum Bundt pan several years ago, the one we had given her as soon as they came onto the market back in the '60's. It had been well seasoned over the years by the many, many perfect pound cakes she had baked in this pan. I feel certain that she only washed out the pan with water, no detergent, after each use, and wiped ...


1

I just bought one at a garage sale that was a Nordic Ware heavy cast aluminum still in the original box. It is a non Teflon coated original. The box states to use non salted shortening like Crisco, generously applied, and temper in a 200-300°C (390-570°F) oven for about an hour.


1

this is just my guess, but i would think that seasoning on the outside would be the same... like illustrated here at the Black Iron blog: http://blackirondude.blogspot.com/2009/01/easy-cast-iron-skillet-reconditioning.html


1

I've never heard of seasoning aluminum, but a casual search turned up similar suggestions that it's do-able. On the other hand, it is quite easy to cook in bare aluminum, and I find it easier to scrub of stuff that's seriously burned on, compared to stainless. Restaurants particularly like aluminum cookware because it's dirt cheap and conducts heat ...


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