31

Not only is it safe but there are entire collections of recipes developed around "foil pack" cooking. Mostly centered around 'campfire' cooking, where one prepares all of the ingredients, wraps them tightly in aluminum foil and places the whole pack in the fire (or oven) to cook the dish.


22

You CAN bake cookies on aluminum foil, but you should be aware that they will cook faster and the bottoms will brown more and get crispy. I would suggest using a slightly lower temperature and briefer baking time. Coincidentally, King Arthur Flour just posted an image of cookies baked on a bare, dark-metal baking sheet (cookies on the LEFT), which will ...


19

To understand what's happening here, we should first have a look at what a pizza stone does. A pizza stone is made from a semi- permeable material with a high thermal capacity, or, plainly put, can store heat and soak up humidity. This means it ensures constant heat at the bottom, plus it buffers the wetness of the dough, giving your pizza a crisp, yet ...


18

Some foods dissolve aluminum foil. From experience, one food that does this is cured ham. Food Safety Education says: It is possible for heavy concentrations of salt, vinegar or some other acidic compound, or highly spiced foods to cause the foil to disintegrate. The product of either of these reactions is an aluminum salt. It does not harm the food but ...


12

There are two questions here: Is aluminum foil porous (particularly the types of foil sold for household cooking)? Is foil's porosity responsible for the liquid that sometimes appears on the other side in cooking/baking applications? I'd say the brief answers to these questions are (1) sometimes a bit, especially when not using "heavy duty" foil, and (2) ...


9

No, you can't make a grilled sandwich, seal it and expect it to still be crispy later. You can reduce the mushiness quite a bit by letting the sandwich cool completely on a wire rack before you package it up. If you don't have a wire rack you can make a lattice out of chopsticks or skewers, the important thing is that the bottom of the sandwich can air cool.


8

That's just aluminium oxide (Al2O3) and it's harmless as: it's insoluble in water it's nearly insoluble in alcohol. is very hard (Basically the same material as a ruby or a sapphire) it's chemically nearly inert Is basically the same substance as the non-shiny side of the Aluminium foil So it's definitely useable for all intents and purposes. (including ...


8

Yes, certainly you can. For that matter, you can simply grease the cookie sheet itself, although that means scrubbing after baking. Cooking times would be the same as for parchment.


5

I just cooked 12 baked potatoes; 6 shiny side out, and 6 shiny side in. Each potato was individually wrapped and all potatoes were about the same size. I cooked the shiny side out potatoes first, then turned off the oven and left the oven door open for 30 minutes before cooking the other six. I also unwrapped both sets of potatoes after sitting for five ...


4

It helps if you think about the reason the foil is used in the first place: If a pie filling needs a certain time to set or bake, the crust might brown too much or even burn. The foil partially shields the crust from the oven heat. How pronounced the “crust getting too dark before filling is done effect” really is depends on the recipe (combination of type ...


3

Stephie's point about the stone's capability to disperse humidity from the dough is probably the most important. Additionally, I'd suspect that the foil prevents the stone from getting up to sufficient temperature during pre-heating: aluminium is a good reflector, not only of visible light but also of thermal radiation. So by wrapping the stone in foil, you ...


3

Cooking fish or other items in paper, "en papillote" is a technique used to lock in moisture and basically steam the fish in its own moisture and any aromatics you add. Using foil is often done in the same way and to remove the fish or other items from more direct drying and scorching effects of heat while cooking, much as you might use foil on poultry ...


3

In any practical sense in cooking, no, aluminum foil is not porous and will not allow liquids to pass. But it's also (obviously) very fragile, and it's very easy to make small holes, etc., while you're trying to get it to conform to the pan. There is also, as has been mentioned, always the possibility of condensation on the side away from the food. I assume ...


2

I would say it happens by evaporation-condensation. The aluminium foil gets cold very fast because it's high surface/volume ratio so any evaporated liquids (oil, water or any liquid even if it doesn't reach it's boiling temperature) would condense on it.


2

Wrap it in a wet, lint-free towel for a few minutes - this will dissolve the sugar near the surface and you should be able to peel the foil off. Repeat as necessary.


2

Check your microwave's owner's manual for a cleaning procedure and follow it. If there isn't one, I'd try the procedure recommended by Samsung which I've summarized below: Sprinkle baking soda over the interior of the oven and rub the entire thing with a damp cloth. Wipe clean with damp cloths. Make a 1 : 8 vinegar to water solution by volume (at least ...


2

If it's permeability then baking steel will never work. I tried steel plates and they are awesome, with or without foil. There are three types of heat transfer: conduction, convection and radiation. Between stone and dough there isn't enough air so the focus here should be conduction and radiation. The stone itself is not a good heat conductor so it cannot ...


2

A whole salmon of 5 kg is going to be about 75 cm long. Very few, if any fish kettles are going to able to accommodate a fish of that size whole. If you find one big enough, it is likely to cost several hundred dollars (US), hundreds of GBP, or hundreds of Euros. Are you going to want to spend that large an amount of money in relation to how often you with ...


2

There's not really a whole lot of difference here; in either case you're talking about poaching a whole fish, it's just a question of equipment. The fish kettle is a quite specialized piece of equipment, so the main drawback I can see is: where are you going to find one? I can't think of any restaurants I've worked in that had one of these (and good luck ...


2

Yes, it can ruin the pan. Non-stick pans are very sensitive to overheating. When their bottom is well covered with fat or fluid and pieces of food, the heat coming from the stove gets conducted from the pan to the food, and it usually doesn't overheat. But if you place a bundle on the pan, there will be large spots not in direct contact with cooling fluid (...


2

Personally I usually use baking paper rather than aluminium foil, for two main reasons: Aluminium foil, being extremely thin, tends to tear easily. It doesn't take much to poke a hole through it, and then its planned use, to keep the baking tray clean, fails because oil or other stuff will ooze through the hole(s). Meat in particular is likely to have sharp ...


1

Appearance is the only difference! There is no performance differance between the shiney side and the dull side. Two sheets are run through the rollers in the mill to acheive the desired thickness then sized, separated, cut to length and packaged.


1

Most food shops likely use a foodservice insulated foil sandwich wrap. By design, the paper side is to be on the inside and the foil side out. While not all have this design, most that I've seen are like the image, laminated with a honeycomb design. This allows for small air pockets between the paper and foil, increasing the insulation ability of the wrap. ...


1

It actually makes no perceptable difference as far heat retenion. The paper has a miniscule insulating effect too. Once heat hits foil interface, it is partially reflected. The paper does absorb some of the fat and liquids from the wrapped contents and helps keep it from making the 'bread' mushy and if the paper is out, you MIGHT have a bit less messy hands ...


1

If you cool your sandwich completely on a rack, as was suggested, it will help eliminate some of the sogginess problem. I’d also take the extra measure of wrapping your sandwich (after it’s cooled completely) in parchment paper, or at least a paper towel. This will help a bit to wick away residual moisture and soak up some excess fat that may cause even ...


1

A scientific experiment was done on leaching of aluminum from aluminum foil in different food solutions - found here. In it the authors conclude: The results clearly indicate that the use of aluminum foil for cooking contributes significantly to the daily intake of aluminum through the cooked foods. The World Health Organisation states that 40mg is a ...


1

On average, you will want to remove the tin foil 20 minutes before it's done. That has been the rule I have followed.


1

For my motorcycle I am using Autosol bluing remover, a metal polish paste. That works pretty good on almost any other kind of metal. Used for hood in a kitchen.


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