9

While many bread and pastry products do depend critically on the formation and management of gluten from wheat flours, this is not universally true. Some types of pastry have structure dependent more on the starch networks which is the other major component of wheat flours; the texture and properties of these pastries is often dependent on the gross ...


7

On Serious Eats, Kenji Alt recommends precooking your apples (by a quick microwave or hot water bath) to set the pectin and prevent shrinking: http://sweets.seriouseats.com/2011/10/the-food-labs-apple-pie-part-2-how-to-make-perfect-apple-pie-filling.html Kenji is my favorite active practical food scientist, and a former recipe developer for Cooks ...


6

Hold back a bit on the lemon, or toss 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda in the filling. I don't see any other cause for the apples to have completely macerated in your recipe other than the acid content to cooking time. 90 minutes is a rather long time, but I'd expect them to hold up quite a bit better than 'mush'. You could also try blind baking your bottom ...


5

I would say that in that case, you can definitely scale the recipe without worrying. Boil the apples with the other ingredients, and split the result once cooked to make two pies. You can usually scale up or down a recipe. The rough idea is simply to multiply the quantity of the ingredients of your recipe by a factor. Doubling means multiplying by 2, making ...


5

I don't know for sure if it is the same enzyme naturally that naturally occurs in apples, but there is a commercial product called NovoShape that serves this purpose. It is a pectin esterase. You can find it in small quantities at Modernist Pantry: http://www.modernistpantry.com/novoshape.html


5

The stone should work just as well. And you'd presumably put the pyrex dish on a preheated oven shelf without worrying. That would give more thermal stress because some parts of the dish would be heated much more than others. Of course there are no guarantees. And (domestic) pyrex literally isn't what it used to be at least in some countries.


5

Technically, yes, though the crust will likely be less brown and evenly brown than if you use a cast iron skillet, especially if the sides of your regular skillet are thinner than the base. If that is the case, the sides will be less brown than the base of the pie. You might also have to adjust the cooking time on the recipe as well, so if you're a ...


4

Some of this is a matter of opinion, as you must decide what type of apple pie you like. Do you want one with discernable applie slices, or one where the filling becomes somewhat like apple sauce? Kenji Alt of Serious Eats has done an in depth review of 10 commonly available apples (at least in the US), and his conclusion is: [...] the best ones in the ...


3

Its a bit involved but you should be able to use these for (hard) Cider. You will need a lot of apples and a press (you can hire them here in the UK, or buy them second hand). Example Recipe


3

The apples have shriveled slightly owing to dehydration. When the apples dry out air is admitted through the core then the fruit will oxidise from the inside out. I would not use these apples for eating.


2

The answer is: between 15 and 45 minutes, depending on the thickness of your apples. Check them periodically, when they’re fork tender, they’re probably cooked enough.


2

One interesting option if you want the filling to be somewhat denser is to use staggered dice - say, 4 apples cut to 1/2" dice, 1 to 1/4", one to 1/8" or 1/16". This way, voids between the big chunks will be filled well without needing to create a lot of thickened liquid in the filling. About the coring problem: For baking, just cutting 2 large and 2 small ...


2

Granny Smith is the standard go-to. I think the best pies use a combination of apples. Alton Brown likes a combination of Granny Smith, Honeycrisp, Braeburn and Golden Delicious. I love Granny Smith and Honeycrisp for out-of-hand eating, so I often have those on hand when I get a hankering for baking. A combination of those two apples do make for a great ...


2

You can let freshly sliced apples and sugar sit in a colander over a container for 3 hours. Mix the drained liquid to a boil and add some cornstarch or tapioca starch and bring that to a boil. Once boiling, add the remainder of the sugar and starch called for by your recipe and bring it to boil a second time. Allow this to cool, and then pour it into your ...


2

I love baking pie in cast iron; it absorbs some moisture that keeps crust crisp. Your skillet may be 'slicker' and let the crust steam a bit more. If it is an enameled, it is much more like baking in glass (which enamel technically is). The other consideration is heating up time for bottom of the pan. Cast iron allows the top to brown before the bottom gets ...


2

I admit, I haven't done this ... but here's my thought: set up a ring form that's just a bit smaller than the pan your baking in (should fit inside the crust ... better to be a little bit small than too large). Cook some sugar to hard crack, and pour it into the form at about 1/16" (1.5mm) deep. Let it cool. Place the crust in the pan, then the cheese ...


2

Hmm.... I'm not sure if this really deserves to be an answer, because I haven't done this specifically, but one thing that comes to mind is an Apple crumb cake I made from this recipe right here. Yes it says strawberry, but apples are if anything better. The point is I think there is at least one thing you could try that might help without changing your ...


2

Simple: it's undercooked. So what was the specific variable that caused this outcome? Who knows. Maybe 400 on your oven isn't the same as 400 on the oven of the person who wrote the recipe, or your pie started out with colder ingredients, or you opened the oven door too many times, or any number of other factors which could affect how long something takes ...


1

If you are cooking for a longer time for a golden crust, try slicing your apples all a uniform 1/2 inch thick. Granny Smiths are a good choice since they are full of pectin, a natural thickening agent. They should keep the bottom from getting soggy. I always use either Granny Smiths or Fujis or a mix of the two for pies/baking. Mine turn out firm and ...


1

The filling of the pie turned to mush because Granny Smith apples completely collapse and do turn to mush when fully cooked. (They are great for applesauce for that reason.) Many other apples will become soft but hold their apple shape - not Granny Smith. You indicate you don't have much choice in apple varieties. In that case if you want defined apple ...


1

I use a similar device. It was an unused wedding gift that I finally pulled out when my oven door hinge broke... It does have a tendency to overcook the top before the rest is done. It also seems to cook quite unevenly. The way I get around the uneveness is to rotate the top as it's cooking. I've baked a few times in it (bread loaves, scones, muffins and ...


1

Sugar / caramel melts far above the boiling point of water. So apples are likely to cook and going to be soft faster than the caramel can melt. The only things I can suggest are to make a caramel sauce or pour liquid caramel onto the (sautéed or somehow else processed) apples. (Another option would be using a salamander or even a burner like the ones to make ...


1

I have tried every pie crust that comes out in cooking magazines and books over the years. One time I used one of Martha Stewarts' (she has many and they are not all the same) that added an egg....that pie was the toast of the evening and truly the most delicious pie I have ever made. I found out that the addition of the egg is a FRENCH method and the ...


1

According to the crumb recipe on the Epicurious Website, the crumb mixture should be the texture of wet sand and then packed down on the mound of filling: 1 cup all purpose flour 1/2 cup sugar 1/4 cup (packed) golden brown sugar 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon salt 6 tablespoons chilled unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-...


1

This Thanksgiving I used the liquid in an egg custard which served warm to drizzle over the pie. I have also made ice cream or a spiced port wine caramel glaze with the liquid. If I am not feeling ambitious I'll use it to sweeten some iced tea. It is just sugar syrup so the sky is the limit.


1

According to the New York Department of Agriculture, fruit pies can be refrozen after thawing, but their quality will degrade. It's only apples and pastry when you think about it, so not much to spoil. It will probably dry out though.


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