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51

This appears to be watercore, specifically radial watercore, from the image you have posted. It should be safe to eat, according to this site and this site. According to an article from Washington State University, watercore is a disorder of some apple variants, which can cause the internal flesh to appear glassy [shiny and translucent] later into the ...


27

I wouldn't even try to salvage this. It's not worth it. The two main problems I see are: You don't have enough liquid. There should be enough water and apple juice that apples can drown in it. Even with a lid on, there should be a gauze under or over it. Like in the old pictures of a jar with anything sweet. Because those maggots probably originated ...


12

It's wax. Apples contain wax in their peel naturally and the amount varies between different varieties. Some don't feel waxy at all. It is there to prevent the fruit of drying out and the industry sometimes adds wax as well (especially to fruits that will be exported long distances), to keep them fresh longer. As for removing the wax, you could try this.


10

I've preserved cut fruit for at least 6 hours before using just lemon juice. Lemon juice inhibits the oxidation of the fruit which prevents browning as well of a loss of crispness. One lemon should be enough juice for a 1.5 quart bowl of cut fruit. Simply squeeze it over the fruit and toss gently to prevent bruising. Since you'll be working with apples, ...


8

It doesn't harm the apple, but it does speed up its ripening as well. And that risks over-ripening. So your perfectly crispy apples may begin to become mealy. Eventually they become targets for yeasts, molds, etc and start to rot. But it's not making them toxic or causing untoward chemical changes. They're all just speeding each other up. Yes, you can just ...


8

Yes, they are usable, at least if they have reached a minimum degree of “ripeness”. There are a few reasons of falling fruit. The first is the so-called June drop, when the tree discards excess baby apples. These fruit are so tiny and unripe, they don’t have real value in the kitchen. During summer, fallen fruit is closer to ripeness, especially if ...


7

The overcooked exterior and undercooked interior indicates that your oil temperature is too high or your fritters are too large. You should be able to solve your problem by frying at a lower temperature and/or making the fritters smaller. 340°F-360°F seems to be the temperature used by many recipes for fritters.


6

While not directly addressing the question of apple sauce, this Food Lab article by Kenji Alt on apple pie has some excellent information on differences of apple varieties. He surveys a number of common (at least in the US) varieties. He notes that apples which brown more quickly tend to be both less tart (as acid, which underlies a tart flavor) inhibits ...


6

Yes. See the accepted answer for Can most sour fruits be jelled by cooking with sugar?. After getting that answer, I have successfully made apple jelly with fresh cooked and strained apple juice and sugar, and nothing else. You can search for apple jelly recipes and find directions.


6

According to Wikipedia, apple cider (US usage) is different from apple juice (US usage) in that: "Apple juice and apple cider are both fruit beverages made from apples, but there is a difference between the two. Fresh cider is raw apple juice that has not undergone a filtration process to remove coarse particles of pulp or sediment. Apple juice is ...


6

This waxy coating is called epicuticular wax, as it forms the cuticle of the fruit. It is essentially paraffin. It acts to both seal in moisture and keep out fungi, dirt and microorganisms. As rumtscho suggests in her comment, even if you could prevent it from forming, it's not a good idea for obvious reasons: it does no harm and keeps the apples fresher ...


6

Apple cider has two meanings, but they both start with raw, pressed juice from crushed apples. Soft apple cider (normally just called cider) is simply the pressed juice, bottled. It is cloudy from suspended apple particles, and turns brown from the oxidation, much as apples themselves do when cut and exposed to air. Hard apple cider is an alcoholic ...


5

You might actually want to look at other methods - either alongside or instead of your current dehydration. "Commercial" Vinegar powder (where it isn't actually just the acid components) is basically maltodextrin sprayed with your vinegar and dried. There's a ton of references like this one, though admittedly I learnt this from watching how its made. ...


4

You could try making your own. Pressing apples isnt that hard to do, but you require a descent amount to make it worth while. Ideally try and find someone with an orchard and ask if you can pick some, however it is very late in the season now and here in the UK at least you would probably be out of luck. Alternativly just buy the best apple juice you can ...


4

In addition to lemon or other citrus juice, you can use Vitamin C - ascorbic acid - crystals. I don't, however, have any suggestion for how much to use. For a small bowl (about a cup), I've used just a pinch and it will actually reverse the browning of apples. For the amount of fruit you're dealing with, I'd mix some crystals and water and use it much the ...


4

It may be worth trying to balance the sour flavor out using some sugar or other sweetener, it will be powerfully flavored but it's better than adding baking soda, as it has been pointed out that may change the texture and flavor in ways you do not want. At the very least it may reduce the amount of acidity you would want to neutralize, so less baking soda ...


4

I found a study done in Korea in 2010 that said pectin can replace shortening in cookies and therefore, they concluded other baked goods. The ideal amount was 30% replacement saying the texture was actually better and the cookies were more moist. They don't recommend going higher than 30% as a 40% difference changed the structural integrity in a "negative" ...


4

Granny Smith's popularity as a baking variety is mostly due to its firmness and tartness, which will offset the caramalized sugars from baking the apple and prevents the apple from falling apart, but theres no reason you can't eat it plain as well. Actually I also prefer fresh apples which arent too sweet, and granny smith's are one of my favorites to snack ...


4

Ripe pears range from as firm as soft wood (think balsa) to as soft as a sponge when ripe, depending on the variety. If your store-bought pears are hard for more than a week, then you bought ones which were picked too young and will never really ripen. This is a common issue with supermarket produce. Ripe apples are generally always firm, even when ripe....


4

Yes, you can do it yourself: People have done this to concentrate alcohol, and other water contaminants, at least as far back as the middle ages. Example: Fractional freezing -- "jacking" in old parlance -- has a long history in the United States. The beverage applejack was produced using this method by first fermenting apple juice into hard apple cider. ...


4

This worked for me as an experiment in freeze concentration (of plums) and freeze distillation (of a lemon juice/vodka mix). It is not fast. Remove the pith, stem, seeds, and the rest from the fruit you want to use. If you want to extract with alcohol, add full-strength vodka now, at about 50/50 ratio with the fruit. Blend it Freeze in a strong plastic bag,...


3

Apple Cider, particularly for the purposes of heating and mulling, should be unfiltered, but more importantly unpasteurized. This is a primary difference you will taste. Also, don't rely on powdered mixes; if you are in Italy, look up a mix (i.e. clove, vanilla, star anise, whatever) and get some actual whole spices (I assume mulling spices are not uncommon) ...


3

Various factors influence the consistency of an apple when it bakes. Acidity. The more acidic the apple is, the better will the apple preserve its pectin and remain its crunch. Also any acidic fluids surrounding the apple will make an impact here. Thickness of the slices. Thin slices will make the apple heat up faster. The surrounding environments ability ...


3

My parents have a Boskoop tree in their garden. I would probably peel the apples before baking them into a pie, but it wouldn't be impossible to not peel them. The skin is thicker than most red/yellow apples but not as hard as a Granny Smith's, say. When I lived in the Netherlands, if I bought Boskoop (or Goudreinette, as they're commonly called there) in ...


3

In general, if you want the lemon flavor, use lemon zest, but if you want the tartness, use lemon juice. Depending on how much tartness you want in the soup, I would use a combination of zest and juice, rather than the full amount of lemon juice in the recipe. There's really not much you can do to save your current batch, other than make a batch without the ...


3

In theory, you could neutralize the acidity (although not the lemon flavor) by adding some sodium bicarbonate (baking soda). The reaction products are water, carbon dioxide, and sodium citrate, which still has a sour flavor, and acts as an emulsifier. This may change the flavor or texture of your soup in unexpected ways. On the other hand, if you would ...


3

As I noted in an answer to this question on reducing the acidity of a honey lemon drink, you really shouldn't use baking soda, as suggested elsewhere, to reduce the acidity. This will most likely taste pretty awful. Try adding baking soda to a lemon drink yourself and see what you think. You have a couple more options, detailed further in this answer to a ...


3

Looking through recipes suggests a variety of apples. Gala showed up the most, with Fuji in second, and McIntosh and Delicious tied for last. If you want to go with the "source" of the recipe for Charoset, though, you'll want a sweet apple. The recipe has its roots in Song of Solomon/Songs, and the verse that refers to the apples reads as: As the apple ...


3

Try it with the peel pureed. I've made a few pies this way and it works well - also adds a bit of color! Really thoroughly wash the apples Cut-out any bad-spots Peel 'em! Throw some of the apple-slices in with the peel and blend. Use a stick-blender for best results Toss the puree in with the rest of the apple-mix and bake!


3

In his in depth review of pie apples, Kenji Alt points out: Well, there's another thing that acid does: it strengthens pectin, the cement-like glue that holds together the cells of fruit. So looking at this arranged spectrum of apples is actually a pretty good indication of how well each fruit is going to hold up during baking. The further right ...


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