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51

This appears to be watercore, specifically radial watercore, from the image you have posted. It should be safe to eat, according to this site and this site. According to an article from Washington State University, watercore is a disorder of some apple variants, which can cause the internal flesh to appear glassy [shiny and translucent] later into the ...


27

I wouldn't even try to salvage this. It's not worth it. The two main problems I see are: You don't have enough liquid. There should be enough water and apple juice that apples can drown in it. Even with a lid on, there should be a gauze under or over it. Like in the old pictures of a jar with anything sweet. Because those maggots probably originated ...


15

I feel fairly confident that what you see is anthocyanins (naturally present in apple skin) reacting with some leavening in your pancakes. Here's a link that explains in more details, but I'll summarize: https://extension.psu.edu/fruit-color-promoting-red-color-development-in-apple Anthocyanins are a natural pH indicator present in many fruits and vegetables....


8

It doesn't harm the apple, but it does speed up its ripening as well. And that risks over-ripening. So your perfectly crispy apples may begin to become mealy. Eventually they become targets for yeasts, molds, etc and start to rot. But it's not making them toxic or causing untoward chemical changes. They're all just speeding each other up. Yes, you can just ...


8

Yes, they are usable, at least if they have reached a minimum degree of “ripeness”. There are a few reasons of falling fruit. The first is the so-called June drop, when the tree discards excess baby apples. These fruit are so tiny and unripe, they don’t have real value in the kitchen. During summer, fallen fruit is closer to ripeness, especially if ...


7

The overcooked exterior and undercooked interior indicates that your oil temperature is too high or your fritters are too large. You should be able to solve your problem by frying at a lower temperature and/or making the fritters smaller. 340°F-360°F seems to be the temperature used by many recipes for fritters.


6

According to this article, the advice to not store onions and potatoes together has nothing to do with ethylene. Onions do not give off ethylene. It has to do with moisture. Both onions and potatoes give off some moisture. Storing them together makes both more likely to rot. Apples, on the other hand, do give off ethylene. This begs the question, "What ...


5

Try it with the peel pureed. I've made a few pies this way and it works well - also adds a bit of color! Really thoroughly wash the apples Cut-out any bad-spots Peel 'em! Throw some of the apple-slices in with the peel and blend. Use a stick-blender for best results Toss the puree in with the rest of the apple-mix and bake!


5

You might actually want to look at other methods - either alongside or instead of your current dehydration. "Commercial" Vinegar powder (where it isn't actually just the acid components) is basically maltodextrin sprayed with your vinegar and dried. There's a ton of references like this one, though admittedly I learnt this from watching how its made. ...


5

I suggest that (in addition to using a reduction of the juice*/cider) you add some solid apple. Personally I would get dried apple, of a tasty variety if at all possible, and put it through a food processor until fairly fine. I dehydrate my own home-grown apples, selected for flavour, but would buy Cox or Granny Smith for this. Then add as you would other ...


5

From Ask An Expert: These symptoms are characteristic of a physiological disorder called bitter pit, which is the result of a calcium deficiency. This may be the result of inadequate calcium in the soil. Bitter pit does not necessarily indicate low soil calcium, although consistent bitter pit for several years certainly points in that direction. Anything ...


4

I found a study done in Korea in 2010 that said pectin can replace shortening in cookies and therefore, they concluded other baked goods. The ideal amount was 30% replacement saying the texture was actually better and the cookies were more moist. They don't recommend going higher than 30% as a 40% difference changed the structural integrity in a "negative" ...


4

Granny Smith's popularity as a baking variety is mostly due to its firmness and tartness, which will offset the caramalized sugars from baking the apple and prevents the apple from falling apart, but theres no reason you can't eat it plain as well. Actually I also prefer fresh apples which arent too sweet, and granny smith's are one of my favorites to snack ...


4

Yes, you can do it yourself: People have done this to concentrate alcohol, and other water contaminants, at least as far back as the middle ages. Example: Fractional freezing -- "jacking" in old parlance -- has a long history in the United States. The beverage applejack was produced using this method by first fermenting apple juice into hard apple cider. ...


4

This worked for me as an experiment in freeze concentration (of plums) and freeze distillation (of a lemon juice/vodka mix). It is not fast. Remove the pith, stem, seeds, and the rest from the fruit you want to use. If you want to extract with alcohol, add full-strength vodka now, at about 50/50 ratio with the fruit. Blend it Freeze in a strong plastic bag,...


4

We have an old variety apple tree, similar to Yellow Transparent, of uncertain origin. When ripe - that is, the flesh has softened to edibility and sweetness has developed - the skins provide a highly tannic note. Removing the skins before using the apples in cooking dramatically reduces the tannins.


4

I just finished two batches of vinegar, one with apples and one with peaches. I use plain quilter’s cotton to cover my jars, as I think cheesecloth lets in too many bugs. At least where I live. I use only fruit, water, and sugar. I stir it every day for about 3 weeks. You can smell it and tell when it goes through the alcohol stage. And you really should be ...


4

Fruit flies don't carry human diseases. They are ok. When they walk on things we want to eat, we can still eat those things. The things don't turn bad. Really, even if the fruit are full of larvae they are still not poison. If you are hungry you can still eat them. If the vinegar has been sitting for 6 months there are no other flies. Try a little. If ...


3

(after reading this: http://www.ncbe.reading.ac.uk/ncbe/protocols/inajam/pdf/jam01.pdf) They usually use pectinase (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pectinase) to break down pectin molecules to help mechanical filtration. They also use gelatins to help clump up particules to help mechanical filtering.


3

Baking powder cannot be used as a substitute for cream of tartar. Cream of tartar is used in recipes as a dry acid. Baking powder has cream of tartar added to leavening agents that have a basic pH. Thus baking powder as a whole is not acidic.


3

Ripe pears range from as firm as soft wood (think balsa) to as soft as a sponge when ripe, depending on the variety. If your store-bought pears are hard for more than a week, then you bought ones which were picked too young and will never really ripen. This is a common issue with supermarket produce. Ripe apples are generally always firm, even when ripe....


3

You could, but it will not be "as" good. Freezing and thawing destroy cell wall structure; making food "mushy" (*). When freezing, water turn to ice, and when freezing slowly, large ice crystals are formed and will break the cells wall. (and ice is take more volume than liquid water) To reduce the risk of damaging the food when freezing/thawing, is to ...


3

Its a bit involved but you should be able to use these for (hard) Cider. You will need a lot of apples and a press (you can hire them here in the UK, or buy them second hand). Example Recipe


3

The apples have shriveled slightly owing to dehydration. When the apples dry out air is admitted through the core then the fruit will oxidise from the inside out. I would not use these apples for eating.


3

It's not going to hurt anything. The apples they use for cider are usually pretty rough, so a little wrinkling isn't going cause a health issue. You very well may not get as much juice, but the juice you will get will be more concentrated. The same principle applies to grapes used for wine...Ideally they will get very little water in the weeks leading up ...


3

While not an exact match, Still Tasty indicates up to 2 days for an apple pie at room temperature; one would expect the baked apple to have similar properties. So yes, I would expect eating your baked apple the next day should be fine. I would not hold them much longer than that, though, as the cooking helps bring out moisture which will foster growth of ...


3

In his in depth review of pie apples, Kenji Alt points out: Well, there's another thing that acid does: it strengthens pectin, the cement-like glue that holds together the cells of fruit. So looking at this arranged spectrum of apples is actually a pretty good indication of how well each fruit is going to hold up during baking. The further right ...


3

Most of the apple juice sold in the US at least is Pasteurized. So unopened, you should have no problem storing at room temp. Once you open the bottle, microorganism's can get in. With a sugary liquid like Apple juice, wild yeasts will find a happy home, and ferment up a bubbly alcoholic apple beverage for you. This can take a week or two to happen, and the ...


3

Ice cream needs a certain ratio of solids to liquids to work. Sugar is an important solid in ice cream. As applesauce is mostly water, you can't replace all, or even most of the sugar. The amount of carbohydrates in applesauce will vary depending on how much you cooked it down, but based on a few nutrition data results for the commercial variety, it seems ...


3

The bane of sugar syrup or caramel making is unwanted crystalization. A few stray sugar crystals, a premature stir, and your caramel gets grainy instead of smooth. Corn syrup is an invert sugar (glucose), which can prevent this. Alternatively, a bit of acid (a few drops of lemon juice, a pinch cream of tartar...) will break some of the sucrose (plain sugar) ...


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