7

The stem is an extension of the heart, and is good to eat. The stem may be peeled prior to cooking to remove tough exterior, this applies more to older artichokes that are more open. Young artichokes that are still tightly closed don’t generally have tough stems.


7

(American English speaker here) To me, the picture of "fondo di carciofo" is a picture of artichoke hearts. What you seem to call a heart, I call a baby with the outer leaves removed. Like this: I don't think of that as a heart, I've always considered that a kind if a cheater thing since that's what you can buy frozen or marinated as "hearts". There is no, ...


5

It's very difficult to give you any specific advice on this without really understanding what it is you're trying to achieve. To get to destination B you have to have a starting point A! What are you trying to achieve here? Have you said, hey I've got this bottle of Almond Milk I have to use up, perhaps I'll try and make a dipping sauce with it? That's a ...


4

Thank you all for your responses. What I was able to conclude is that although the Italian word cuore translates into the English word heart, and while in Italian cuore di carciofo always refers to the inner leaves of an artichoke, the word artichoke heart seems to be used synonymously with artichoke bottom, artichoke crown, and artichoke base in some places,...


4

I've seen the convex bottoms sold as "artichoke crowns" (separated from any tiny leaves or stem) on occasion but Alibaba sometimes lists them as "artichoke bottoms".


3

We eat artichoke often. We pressure cook them in an old one quart aluminum pot. I have seen the cut stem (not chewed) butt turn and ooze blue from the cut stem when left in the fridge too long. In that condition the stem has a sour fermentation, but no obvious mold. I have eaten it like this thinking, I am getting extra. I like artichoke stem a lot and have ...


2

I trim the stem and remove the outer leaves till they snap to get to the fresh inner core and steam them the night or morning before grilling so they are cold and moist. I prefer steaming because I want all of the nutrients to remain in the artichoke. I cut them in half for the grill, remove the choke and brush them with grapeseed oil where they come into ...


2

My personal favorite is to boil them for about an hour and then use a butter knife to scrap the tender part of the petals (the inner part). I then mix the artichoke flesh and the choke with rice (white rice works best for me) and season it with salt, lemon juice and a bit of mayonnaise.


1

I was a chemistry major in college and I suspect this happened because the copper in the artichoke reacted with oxygen in the air creating copper oxide, which is a really pretty blue color in low concentrations. You chewing it may have broken it up, allowing the oxygen easier "access" to react with the copper when you left it out.


1

Here is what I tried from a combination of google results. They turned out great. Rinse the artichokes. Remove any leaves from the stem of the artichoke and any that may fall off during cooking. With kitchen shears, or sharp scissors, remove the thorny tips from the leaves. Cut about an inch off of the top of the artichoke. Rub lemon on the exposed ...


1

It is a little difficult to answer your question about whether or not almond milk can be used as a dipping sauce base. Sure, it could be used as a base. But what were you looking to make? If you are looking to make something like a creamy sauce with a non-dairy milk alternative, almond milk is a good replacement for the dairy you would use. However, if you ...


1

Although they may be using a different variety of artichoke, the results shouldn't vary too drastically. Ones descending from the italian varieties are often also purple in colour and will have a similar flavour Selecting artichokes Squeeze the artichoke. You're looking for it to be firm and dense, indicating it is moist inside. You actually want the ...


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