52

The concern with garlic in oil leading to botulism is about long-term storage, usually in the context of garlic oil as a 'shelf-stable' condiment; the botulism needs time to grow in the anaerobic environment provided by the oil. If you're making a marinade and using it within a few hours or a day or two, as marinades tend to be, and especially if you're ...


45

It's Thai, but it's a relatively new dish as it doesn't date back when the country was called Siam, and it uses Chinese style noodles and preparation (with Thai flavors). There was a coup against the monarchy in 1932; in 1938 Plaek Phibunsongkhram (aka Phibun) came to power as prime minister. Phibun ordered the creation of a new national dish, "Gway Teow ...


31

Thickening agents To thicken, you would mix in an agent designed to do so. There are many options, but here are some that are directly applicable to Asian cooking: Corn starch - Works well in small quantities, though I find it has a tendency to turn sauces into jello in the fridge. If you have too much liquid in your sauce and use a relatively large amount ...


24

Many such sauces include a thickening starch, like corn starch. This can either be mixed with some of the cold liquid and stirred into the hot, or used to coat ingredients prior to adding liquid (with slightly different results). In a crock pot you can do this at the beginning, or when everything is cooked, a few minutes before serving. Some starches (e.g. ...


19

春卷 (Chūnjuǎn, Spring rolls) are julienned vegetables, sometimes with a bit of noodles, sometimes with a bit of minced meat, wrapped with a flour dough skin and pan- or deep-fried. They are a filled roll. You can see the different varieties by country here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spring_roll Spring roll: 鸡蛋卷 (Jīdàn juǎn, Egg rolls) are many different ...


14

Based on your photo, this is most likely a wagashi (Japanese sweet) called daifuku in Japanese. It's got an outer layer made from cooked glutinous rice that has been pounded and kneaded aggressively until smooth, which is called mochi. The inside is often a red bean paste made from a bean called azuki in Japanese (or adzuki in an odd English-language ...


12

Round lo mein noodles look veeeeery similar to spaghetti: Spaghetti Lo mein The biggest difference, ingredient-wise is that dried pasta (mostly?) does not contain eggs and lo mein noodles do. I know that at least once shopping mall food court chinese food place I've eaten from uses spaghetti for their lo mein. It's kind of obvious, but it's not bad. I ...


11

The first thing that caught my eye was the soy sauce. However, I think the real culprit here is the miso. From Wikipedia: Typically, miso is salty, but its flavor and aroma depend on various factors in the ingredients and fermentation process. Different varieties of miso have been described as salty, sweet, earthy, fruity, and savory. About red miso, ...


10

It was called garum, and indeed the ancient Romans used it, as did the ancient Greeks: Garum was prepared from the intestines of small fishes through the process of bacterial fermentation. Fishermen would lay out their catch according to the type and part of the fish, allowing makers to pick the exact ingredients they wanted. The fish parts were then ...


9

Since your recipe only calls for a tablespoon, I am inferring this is toasted sesame oil, which is used for its strong and lovely flavor. There really are no good substitutes for this purpose. I would recommend investing in the bottle, which kept in the refrigerator should last a long time, and will bring flavor to many dishes. If you choose not to do ...


9

Another option is Smoked Paprika. As Jolene wisely cautions, those liquid smoke products are very strong. And even though it might be "natural" smoke flavor, it can lend a "synthetic" taste to delicate foods. Smoked Paprika has a much more subtle smokiness. Of course, it will also add color and additional flavor of its own. It sounds to me like this would ...


9

The Chinese cultural norm is to eat rice with chopsticks. It would be very inconvenient to constantly switch back and forth between eating with chopsticks and a spoon depending upon whether you were eating rice or vegetables or meat. To get around the loose grain problem, you can use the shovel method. You pick up your bowl and use a shoveling motion with ...


9

Looks like Vietnamese Honeycomb Cake made with pandan and tapioca: http://danangcuisine.com/recipes/recipe-28-banh-bo-nuong-vietnamese-honeycomb-cake/


8

As a substitute for untoasted sesame oil, most light oils will work (light olive, peanut, canola, sunflower, etc). Any nut or seed oil should be pretty close. Toasted sesame oil has a much bolder and nuttier flavor. It could perhaps be approximated with a light oil and adding toasted sesame to your dish.


8

If you actually chop it finely, you should be okay. Specifically, you should cut it into thin disks against the grain first, so that you're cutting the fibers into short enough lengths not to bother you. Depending on how tough your lemongrass is, you may have to remove some outer layers to do this. At that point, it may already be possible to chew, but ...


8

You're not missing anything, lemongrass is very fibrous and often it is a good idea to remove it like a bay leaf. If it's quite fresh it can be left in if you peel away the outside layers, you use only the most tender portion (about a half-inch from the root to about 2 inches from the root), and you mince very finely. If you do all that, you can stir-fry or ...


8

To add smoky flavor, you can add a drop of liquid smoke. Do it drop by drop - be careful, it's easy to use too much and not be able to taste anything else. Liquid smoke is actually made by distilling smoke and it really does add a flavor much like putting the food in a smoker (or a big fire).


8

In Japanese food, I would say you use chopsticks to eat white rice that comes in a rice bowl. Japanese rice is short/medium grained and sticks together so you can pick up clumps at a time. You also learn to pick up single grains, so as not to leave a single grain in the bowl at the end of the meal. This is good manners. Someone mentioned the shovel method,...


8

"Curry" is based on the Tamil word "Kari", which refers to any of various highly-spiced side dishes intended to be eaten over rice. Englishmen from the British East India Company encountered the Tamil word in their first explorations of the subcontinent, applied it more broadly to pretty much all Indian dishes, and used it in preference to words in other ...


7

The nori that you buy as sheets is usually a different species than that of the form prepared as aonori. The form that you buy in sheets is, additionally, typically roasted, which changes the flavor. Aonori is usually of the genus Monostroma or Enteromorpha. Toasted nori for sushi is usually of the genus Porphyra. Because of those two details, I don't ...


7

There is a high level of similarity between the two dishes, as they share an origin in the same Chinese dish. To answer your question, let's look at the differences: Bami Goreng is an Indonesian / Malayan dish where the flavor is influenced heavily by the presence of Terasi in the spicing mix. This type of shrimp paste has a very unique taste that sets ...


7

It's possible it was a combination called 麻辣 (ma-la,) literally "numbing and spicy", a mix of hot chilies and Sichuan peppercorns (which are called Huā jiāo [花椒].)


7

Salsola soda can be eaten raw or sautéed quickly - as a very rough rule of thumb, think “spinach”. If you are looking for recipes, it’s helpful to know that in Italian cuisine it’s called Agretti or Barba di frate If you search for one of these names plus “recipe”, you should find enough recipes to work from there.


7

I think those are chow fun noodles, cut them to the desired size if not already cut, soak it in cool water for about 7-15 mins then hand unroll them. That how I was taught anyways. The packaging looks tight too so possibly cut the sides off too, should help it stop from clumping and allow the water to penetrate and separate them.


7

Not a Japanese chef, but I do homemade nori rolls and onigiri: The purpose of the vinegar in sushi rice is to flavor it, not to make it more sticky. If anything, the vinegar makes it less sticky due to adding a little acidity and moisture. Sushi rice is supposed to be delicate and "crumble" when you bite into it. In contrast, onigiri rice should ...


6

In the west beef are not as "fresh" as in asia. The meat in the supermarket in the west most likely have been hanged and drained of any blood for several days. (Hence, there's no need to wash the blood) In asia, at least the part where I live, the meat that I buy at 6 in the morning is coming from a cow that's slaughtered at 4. In fact, there's a dish here ...


6

Absolutely you can! It's a popular choice with Chinese and Indian flavor profiles. You can just treat it exactly like you would any other leftover rice. It's a lovely ingredient to work with. The nutty Basmati flavor works beautifully however you choose to season fried rice.


6

If you're talking about American-"Chinese" cuisine, there may be a different distinction: Vietnamese spring rolls are always wrapped in rice paper, and are commonly sold as just plain "Spring Rolls", whereas "Egg Roll" is more common for the Chinese-style roll made with an egg-based batter (pictured in setek's answer). While it would not be wrong to call an ...


6

In Thai cooking, lemongrass is used in spicy soups like tom yam and tom kha (coconut soup with galangal). Here it’s not finely cut, and is just pushed aside when eaten, along with other spices like the galangal. Thais also make a lemongrass salad called yam takhrai, where finely sliced lemongrass is eaten raw. Below is a link where you can see this being ...


6

In America's Test Kitchen's recipe for Hot and Sour Soup (sorry, paywalled), they call for 5 tablespoons black Chinese vinegar or 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar plus 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar. So a 50/50 mix of both vinegars for more than twice the amount of Chinkiang vinegar. I have made Hot and Sour Soup with Chinkiang and with the red wine and balsamic ...


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