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The concern with garlic in oil leading to botulism is about long-term storage, usually in the context of garlic oil as a 'shelf-stable' condiment; the botulism needs time to grow in the anaerobic environment provided by the oil. If you're making a marinade and using it within a few hours or a day or two, as marinades tend to be, and especially if you're ...


7

Not a Japanese chef, but I do homemade nori rolls and onigiri: The purpose of the vinegar in sushi rice is to flavor it, not to make it more sticky. If anything, the vinegar makes it less sticky due to adding a little acidity and moisture. Sushi rice is supposed to be delicate and "crumble" when you bite into it. In contrast, onigiri rice should ...


4

There's probably not much difference. There is a fair amount of variation in preparation methods for Vietnamese preserved limes and lemons (chanh muối). The Garden Betty recipe you linked is probably the most common technique - soaking nearly-quartered lemons in heavily salted water for a few weeks - but that may not be the same method used for the $3 jar ...


2

Asia is a very large place, and both cultural norms and types of rice vary widely. Here's a quick overview, but even this is painting with pretty wide brush strokes. Japan and China: Rice is typically short grain, and eaten with chopsticks. Some dishes where grains separate, like fried rice, are eaten with Chinese-style short porcelain spoons. Korea: Rice ...


2

I was also led to believe it originated in Guangzhou. I moved to Guangzhou in 2019 and to my surprise I could not find it anywhere. I've been to many restaurants here and it is never on the menu. I asked my Cantonese Ayi to make it and she had no idea what it was, she'd never heard of it! I showed her photos and she declared it was not a Cantonese dish. ...


1

This appears to be some kind of chickpea flour. According to Google Translate, the Burmese word for chickpea is ကုလားပဲ, which matches the label. Here is a similar product, “roasted chickpea flour”, for label comparison for sale:


1

Yes you can! Use thin spaghetti or angel hair. I have made pancit out of spaghetti noodles several times. Where I live yellow Asian noodles are hard to find.


1

I have to disagree with all the answers above which say that it doesn't originate in Canton/Guangzhou, or anywhere in Guangdong Province. As a matter of fact, it very likely did. At least I have ordered it in many Cantonese restaurants in Guangdong, but usually not under the name sang choi bowl. If I recall correctly, usually it's called something like 小炒皇 ...


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