137

See the improved answer here: What DOES Help? Which acid works best to keep avocados from browning? Answer: None (of the acids tested) It's not that acid doesn't do much to help. ALL OF THE ACIDS TESTED CAUSED AVOCADOS TO BECOME MORE BROWN AND TO BECOME BROWN FASTER THAN NO TREATMENT AT ALL I am not kidding. Method For acid, I used freshly squeezed ...


54

I sincerely doubt any particular chef or "popular show business personality" is responsible for this, though perhaps one or more such people have done this at one time or another. Many people are used to taking other fruits in one hand and a knife in the other and preparing the fruit for eating. I distinctly remember my father showing me how to core an ...


53

TL; DR Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) works to slow, even halt the browning of avocados, even in the face of salt, vinegar (in salsa), and lime juice, all of which have been shown (or will be shown) to speed browning. At a concentration of 100mg per 50 grams of avocado, it is also virtually tasteless. You can buy pure ascorbic acid powder, which I did and then ...


34

Nice experiment. Oddly enough food scientists in Florida have looked into the same problem, and achieved results similar to yours: THE RETARDATION OF ENZYMATIC BROWNING IN AVOCADO PUREE AND GUACAMOLE Enzymatic browning in avocado puree and guacamole was evaluated by reflectance measurements for several varieties of avocado with varying amounts of ...


13

Neither. The traditional instrument for making guacamole, and other Mexican mashed and ground preparations, is the mocaljete, which is similar to a mortar & pestle, but made with a shorter pestle and out of black basalt, a rough volcanic stone: A regular mortar and pestle out of ceramic or granite will not work for a fat, squishy fruit like avocado; it ...


13

The cold process is easy.Just blend the fresh pulp using a kitchen blender to make a thin and smooth pulp.Heat the pulp in low heat and maintain a 50 degrees celcius heat for about an hour and a quarter.This is called malaxation which enables the oil molecules to collect into globules visible by eye.Then after malaxation,take the warm malaxed pulp and strain ...


12

I've never heard of it being done and I can't imagine why you'd want to try. An avocado is 70-80% water and 15% fat. That means you would basically be making pickled fat. Compare to cucumbers and peppers which are both in the range of 0.1 to 0.2% fat, and much firmer than even an unripe avocado when raw. I'm sure that it would be safe as long as it's done ...


12

Part of the problem is that "salsa" doesn't mean just one thing to everyone. If you do a web search for "avocado salsa" you get images ranging from liquid to chunky: Similarly, there's no one "correct" way to make guacamole. Some people like it smooth and thick - hummus-like, if you will, other people like it partially mashed and partially chunky... almost ...


11

Most avocado's are the Hass variety, which will go very dark when ripe It look like you have bought a Reed or maybe Gwen variety. They are perfectly fine. Their skin colour will not significantly change as they ripen, so to check, gently squeeze near the point, and if it is soft it is ripe. If not a few days by the window at room temperature will fix it


11

You're correct - it's a myth, as is adding something acidic to it like lemon juice--see explanation here. As you said, what causes it to brown is the oxidation, and that's just exposure to the air. If you wrap a cut avocado (or guacamole) in plastic wrap so there's no air space between the wrap and the avocado, then it will stay green longer than areas where ...


10

I made avocado oil from my trees here in southern Florida. I whipped up the pulp of 12 avocados with 1/3 cup coconut oil. I whipped for about 25 min with a hand blender on high. The mixture looks creamy and starts to look shiny. Then I put in my food dehydrator overnight . I cut muslin circles to fit the tray and layered it about 1/2 thick. There was enough ...


10

It boils down to chemical make up. Avocados, like egg yolks, contain a decent amount of fats, carotenoids, and sulfurous compounds. Avocados are one of the most concentrated fruit sources of fats and fatty acids. Both egg yolks and avocados contain carotenoid phytochemicals like lutein, zeaxathanin, and a-carotene. In avocados the sulphur is mostly in the ...


9

Porcelain or ceramic ones are: lighter You'll have to grab them with one hand to use them. easier to break cheaper This is related with the last point. glazed Porcelain ones don't need to be so, but ceramic ones are. It gives them a smoother surface, but some parts of the shell might husk off. It is not affected by acids (marble mortars will), and ...


8

If you don't want to use the unripened avocado right away, according to this site Store Cut Unripe Avocados - If you have cut open your... avocado and found it to be unripe, sprinkle the exposed flesh of the avocado with lemon or lime juice, place the two halves back together and cover tightly with clear plastic wrap before placing in the refrigerator. ...


8

The culinary impact of proteases are to tenderize meat and that, if uncooked, they will prevent gelatin from setting. I have not heard of, and was unable to find, any recipe using avocados for meat tenderization. I was easily able to find many recipes that use fresh avocado with gelatin. Therefore, I don't believe avocados contain any proteases that are of ...


7

After 4 years... the classical spoon based method for avocado processing is obsolete. The Triptych Peel Method This combines a well known method to remove the seed, with a scheme for conservatively reducing the skin tension by a series of shallow cuts along the surface. This process allows for direct removal of both seed and skin, with minimal effort and ...


7

You're exactly right in figuring out that part of the problem is having grown up with some of the world's best avocadoes, and then moving up North where decent avocadoes are scarce! :) Tasty avocadoes aren't all going the way of the dodo just yet, but you might have to move to Texas or Florida, or check some Mexican markets in your area, to get better ...


7

It's simply not ripe yet Don't buy avocado's or any other fruit and vegetable in pre-packed bags, you cannot tell what state they are in Buy from a local grocer whom you can trust, and therefore can get honest answers on the state of the produce Avocados are usually sold unripe for shipping reasons. Buy ahead of need, and let them ripen at room ...


7

I think what you are seeing is marketing speak. Many different manufacturers put out similar products but may call them by different names. From what I've seen, guacamole, guacamole dip, and avocado dip are pretty much synonymous. They can all be used as a dip or condiment. There will be differences, e.g. one may taste slightly different than another or ...


7

No If it is labeled "cosmetic grade" then it is not safe to cook with, it is only safe if it says "food grade". I understand cosmetic grades of otherwise edible products (like cocoa butter or your avocado oil) may be made with solvents that are not food-safe, they may have trace contaminants from the processes involved, there may be any number of things ...


6

See What oil or fat to use for different purposes? for a general discussion about choosing oils. If you are using unrefined avocado oil, you it will have a unique flavor that will affect your dish or outcome, and in that case, the flavor would be the primary purpose. If you are using refined avocado oil, its main unique characteristic is that it has an ...


6

Propanethiol S-oxide gas will stop the browning affect on the surface of avocados. This sulfur oxide is found in the gas formed from cutting bitter/sharp onions. When storing guacamole in a bowl, place a half an onion chopped inside a smaller bowl, then place the smaller bowl in the center on top of the guacamole. Then cover with saran wrap as to not remove ...


6

They're still edible after cooking, but they take on a texture people don't usually like too much. It's kinda similar to them being overripe, minus the browning, very soft and maybe even a little slimy. The flavor changes a bit too, but I'm not sure how to describe it. It may be subjective (I'm just completely used to eating them fresh) but it seems like ...


6

If it's fully green or even yellow the chances are it's still rock hard. Personally a little brown on an avocado is a sign of ripeness, I'd regard an avocado that's gone black as completely past it. https://nuxx.net/gallery/v/moblog/IMG_20100831_090647.jpg.html?g2_imageViewsIndex=1


6

I haven't done a side-by-side comparison, but I find that once an avocado's ripe, I can keep it there for a few days by putting it in the fridge. It doesn't halt the process of getting brown spots inside, but it seems to slow it down some.


5

You can try dipping it into acidulated water (water with acid added, either lemon juice or vinegar, or even a powdered vitamin c tablet). This should delay the browning, but I am not sure it will last long enough to hold the rolls overnight. You will have the additional problem that the nori will begin to soften overnight. See also: What's the best ...


5

As a rule, avocado should only be frozen in pureed form. When frozen, it should be placed in an air-tight container (such as a sealable dish or freezer bag) with only enough room for expansion as it cools. The variable fat and water content of avocados is not well suited to freezing, and renders the thawed product spongy and elastic, a far cry from the ...


5

Supply and demand. Supplies of avocados are declining due to droughts and unusual weather patterns. Not only drought can reduce crops, but unusual cool weather patterns can as well. Avocados dislike temperatures lower than 10°C and have absolutely no frost tolerance. Demand for avocados is going steadily upward as more people enjoy cuisines in which they ...


4

Here is one recipe: Lemon, Garlic & Rosemary Pickled Avocados (from the California Avocado Commission, also see their blog post about pickling and other avocado preservation)


4

I usually buy green, hard avocados to use them in a couple of weeks. When I'm looking for an almost ready avocado for my guacamole at the supermarket, I look for a not-so-hard one and pop off the stem: this is a tip I found over the internet and it really works. Pulp under the stem should be greenish and not brown or dark, otherwise it's probably rotten. You ...


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