Hot answers tagged

22

This looks like your meat was discovered by a female fly (probably something like a blow fly) who thought that the protein-rich “carrion” would make a great spot for her offspring and subsequently laid a cluster of eggs. During summer, it may take as little as a few minutes for an uncovered piece of meat to become a fly nursery. Especially in the height of ...


21

In the UK there are two main cuts of bacon. There's "streaky bacon", which is cut from the pork belly. This is mostly what you get in the US. There's also "back bacon" which is cut from the pork loin. This is generally more popular and is very much leaner than streaky bacon. In the US you call it "Canadian bacon". You can also get "middle bacon" which ...


16

More explicit answer for the USA: USDA says that bacon is not graded. Is bacon inspected and graded? All bacon found in retail stores is either USDA inspected for wholesomeness or inspected by State systems that have standards equal to the Federal government. Each animal, from which the bacon is made, is inspected for signs of disease. The "Inspected ...


15

This is how I cook bacon, and also produce almost perfectly flat bacon. No special tools required (Well, I'm assuming most people have the following in their kitchen). Tools Sheet Tray Cooling Rack (slightly smaller than the sheet tray) parchment paper (Optional, but makes for easier cleanup). BACON (I like the extra-thick cut). Steps Take the sheet tray ...


14

As a vegetarian, I regularly try to compensate for the lack of meat in a normally meat-containing dish using a number of methods, though I feel none can truly replace the addition of meat perfectly. In my experience, duplicating the effects of the addition of meat to a dish requires considering individually the effects the addition would have. First I'll ...


14

I actually have some experience with exactly this. I needed to do a breakfast party for a bunch of bikers, at 5am, by myself, in the middle of nowhere. The middle of nowhere in Alaska has a special meaning that would elude most readers of this. It's a special kind of middle-of-nowhere. So, I promise, I took it seriously, and this actually works: You can ...


13

Cutting bacon into cubes was a regular prep task for me when I was cooking professionally, so I got very fast at it. Here are the tricks I found: Fully cooked (baked) bacon cuts MUCH faster and cleaner, and you can make perfect cubes Don't use a serrated knife. It'll be easier to cut with, but it will shred and fray the bacon as you slice, eventually ...


12

Restaurants--especially large scale catering and buffets--almost always bake bacon. It is extremely effective, and very easy. Lay the bacon out on rimmed sheet pans, in a single layer. For extra crispiness, use a rack, but cleaning the racks is not fun. Bake at 350-400 F (I give a temperature range since you may be using the oven for other items) for ...


12

In all seriousness, it's called pork belly.


11

This is specifically the reason for the invention of Bacon Presses


11

There are many things called bacon in many places, and all cook different. I will hit a few and hope I am mostly right, please feel free to edit where I may be speaking from mistake. British Rashers is typically made from the loin with a bit of the side to belly still attached. This would be a meatier cut and tend to have more of the taste and texture of ...


10

I am going to say that in most cases, labels like premium, artisan, etc. are marketing gimmicks. I do not know of any labeling rules that will tell you a given bacon is from a better quality pork belly than another. But, there is certainly a difference, and cheap bacon is just that, cheap and been made from the cheapest pork bellies obtained in mass. In ...


10

I'm not sure this is really a sensible answer… but it's one way… Deep-fry it. Should take about 15 - 30s. That way it will come out even fattier than it went in. Any fat that comes off will be added to the next batch, though probably at an overall loss to the fryer, so you'll have to periodically top back with oil. Late edit: I forget the US likes their ...


10

Moose have bellies, so there is no reason that you can't make moose bacon. If you like moose, there is a high likelihood you will like moose bacon. Whether or not other people like it or not is not really something we address on this site. I would say, give it a go and report back. Here is a brief conversation about moose bacon. It might help.


9

You have two different approaches from Catija and eckes, depending on what you favor, but you could also combine both approaches - Start by chopping up the bacon, and then cooking it in the pot until it's nicely crisped and the fat is rendered. Remove the bacon with a slotted spoon, to paper towels to soak the remaining fat from the bacon and leave it in ...


8

Soak and rinse... completely immerse the side of bacon for a few hours in clean, cold ice-water, drain, rinse, and repeat. A cooler is best for this, as it keeps the meat cool and offers lots of water for the salt to dilute into, otherwise a use a large pot in the fridge. The downside is that this may also affect the "cure" - the smoke-flavor that many ...


8

As the bacon cooks the meat reduces in size faster than the fat does. Since they are cut into strips this causes the fat to bunch up or even coil if the bacon isn't flipped enough. The fat will eventually reduce as well when it renders but not enough to straighten out the poor bacon.


8

I first remember seeing Melissa d'Arabian demonstrate using KITCHEN SHEARS to cube bacon during her season on "The Next Food Network Star". I tried it soon after and I find that the scissor action of the shears makes it EASY to cube bacon. Clean, consistent easy to use.


8

While you can certainly roast bacon at higher temperatures, when I have time, I really prefer going "low and slow." Spread in a single layer on a baking sheet (lined with foil for easy clean-up -- you don't need parchment this way). Then bake at 250F or at any temperature above, until the desired texture. Depending on the thickness of the bacon, at 250F ...


8

The answer is related to a similar issue appearing in this question. Basically, that residue is mostly water, along with denatured proteins from the meat. When meat is cooked and the cells expel moisture, there are a lot of dissolved proteins which sometimes make the liquid light-colored and thick. People tend to notice it more with certain meats than ...


7

According to this America's Test Kitchen video, you can get plump crisp and tender bacon by barely covering your bacon with water in a skillet over high heat, turning the heat down to medium when the water starts boiling and down again to medium-low once it has all evaporated and cook until ready. Having water in your skillet will keep the cooking ...


7

You CAN desalt bacon. Place the bacon in tupperware filled with water. Be sure to arrange the bacon so they are interlaced at the ends, allowing their surfaces to be exposed to the water. Leave it overnight in the fridge. Drain the water. Be careful, though, as removing the salts and preservatives will shorten the lifespan of your bacon. Therefore, you'll ...


7

I did a little digging and ran into a Backwoods Home Magazine article on canning bacon. It is apparently possible, even easy. Basically, the process seems to be: lay bacon strips on paper, put another piece of paper over them. Roll this up (and possibly fold it) and put the roll in a mason jar. 90 minutes at 10psi (I'm quoting here, I'm not a canner myself) ...


7

I'm pretty sure that's just steam and hot air bubbling in the layer of fat/grease that's all over the bacon.


7

If a recipe calls for you to drain the fat, drain the fat. If you are trying to lose weight, drain the fat. If you don't want an unattractive glossy skim on top, or for it to cool and harden, drain the fat. Having too much fat in your pan will possibly interfere with the frying technique you are using, which will change the end product. That said, it sounds ...


7

I would say a chef's knife, for sure. Make sure it's sharp! If you've never sharpened your knives (not just honed using a steel) it can make a world of difference. If you are having troubles, making sure the meat is chilled will help. Straight out of the fridge works okay, but it is even easier if you throw it in the freezer for 15 minutes or so.


7

The simplest answer to this is to cook at approximately 350-375 degrees F laid out on parchment paper on a cookie sheet. This is a pretty good example: Instructions How to make perfect oven bacon or How should I cook bacon in an oven Put your oven rack in the middle position, preheat the oven to 375° and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Lay the ...


7

Most of the varieties of a product called Bacon Salt (originally semi-local to my area, but I think now available nationally in the US and online) are vegan, and all, to my knowledge, are vegetarian. I've used it in concert with various fats (olive oil, butter, neutral vegetable oils) to get fairly convincing result, usually adding it directly to the fat a ...


7

I raise my own pigs and don't feed them any fish. I feed all kinds of fruit, avos, eggs, acacia tree leaves, red apple succulent etc. All past pigs were excellent and not fishy. I never had the fish taste problem before this"girl" pig. It tastes like fish when cooked. It is like fresh fish, not fishy bad fish. It does not smell like fish or good or bad. I ...


7

A few things occur to me: Fat content is significantly different between chuck and bacon. Chuck is generally about 15-25% fat (depending on the cut); bacon is often more than 50% fat. The cuts are not equivalent. Chuck is from the shoulder of beef; bacon is usually made from the belly or side. The muscles thus receive very different amounts of work and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible