Hot answers tagged

22

This looks like your meat was discovered by a female fly (probably something like a blow fly) who thought that the protein-rich “carrion” would make a great spot for her offspring and subsequently laid a cluster of eggs. During summer, it may take as little as a few minutes for an uncovered piece of meat to become a fly nursery. Especially in the height of ...


22

In the UK there are two main cuts of bacon. There's "streaky bacon", which is cut from the pork belly. This is mostly what you get in the US. There's also "back bacon" which is cut from the pork loin. This is generally more popular and is very much leaner than streaky bacon. In the US you call it "Canadian bacon". You can also get "middle bacon" which ...


17

More explicit answer for the USA: USDA says that bacon is not graded. Is bacon inspected and graded? All bacon found in retail stores is either USDA inspected for wholesomeness or inspected by State systems that have standards equal to the Federal government. Each animal, from which the bacon is made, is inspected for signs of disease. The "Inspected ...


16

Chop bacon finely...or even use a food processor. Place in a pot. Add just enough water to cover the bottom of pan and prevent initial sticking. Place on very low heat. You might even need a heat diffuser. You don't want frying, just low, gentle heat. Too much heat produces off flavors. It might take a few hours. You will have rendered fat, but also ...


14

I actually have some experience with exactly this. I needed to do a breakfast party for a bunch of bikers, at 5am, by myself, in the middle of nowhere. The middle of nowhere in Alaska has a special meaning that would elude most readers of this. It's a special kind of middle-of-nowhere. So, I promise, I took it seriously, and this actually works: You can ...


12

In all seriousness, it's called pork belly.


11

There are many things called bacon in many places, and all cook different. I will hit a few and hope I am mostly right, please feel free to edit where I may be speaking from mistake. British Rashers is typically made from the loin with a bit of the side to belly still attached. This would be a meatier cut and tend to have more of the taste and texture of ...


10

I am going to say that in most cases, labels like premium, artisan, etc. are marketing gimmicks. I do not know of any labeling rules that will tell you a given bacon is from a better quality pork belly than another. But, there is certainly a difference, and cheap bacon is just that, cheap and been made from the cheapest pork bellies obtained in mass. In ...


10

I'm not sure this is really a sensible answer… but it's one way… Deep-fry it. Should take about 15 - 30s. That way it will come out even fattier than it went in. Any fat that comes off will be added to the next batch, though probably at an overall loss to the fryer, so you'll have to periodically top back with oil. Late edit: I forget the US likes their ...


10

Moose have bellies, so there is no reason that you can't make moose bacon. If you like moose, there is a high likelihood you will like moose bacon. Whether or not other people like it or not is not really something we address on this site. I would say, give it a go and report back. Here is a brief conversation about moose bacon. It might help.


9

The answer is related to a similar issue appearing in this question. Basically, that residue is mostly water, along with denatured proteins from the meat. When meat is cooked and the cells expel moisture, there are a lot of dissolved proteins which sometimes make the liquid light-colored and thick. People tend to notice it more with certain meats than ...


9

You have two different approaches from Catija and eckes, depending on what you favor, but you could also combine both approaches - Start by chopping up the bacon, and then cooking it in the pot until it's nicely crisped and the fat is rendered. Remove the bacon with a slotted spoon, to paper towels to soak the remaining fat from the bacon and leave it in ...


7

You CAN desalt bacon. Place the bacon in tupperware filled with water. Be sure to arrange the bacon so they are interlaced at the ends, allowing their surfaces to be exposed to the water. Leave it overnight in the fridge. Drain the water. Be careful, though, as removing the salts and preservatives will shorten the lifespan of your bacon. Therefore, you'll ...


7

I raise my own pigs and don't feed them any fish. I feed all kinds of fruit, avos, eggs, acacia tree leaves, red apple succulent etc. All past pigs were excellent and not fishy. I never had the fish taste problem before this"girl" pig. It tastes like fish when cooked. It is like fresh fish, not fishy bad fish. It does not smell like fish or good or bad. I ...


7

A few things occur to me: Fat content is significantly different between chuck and bacon. Chuck is generally about 15-25% fat (depending on the cut); bacon is often more than 50% fat. The cuts are not equivalent. Chuck is from the shoulder of beef; bacon is usually made from the belly or side. The muscles thus receive very different amounts of work and ...


7

Roll the bacon into its spiral and set it on end in a muffin tin to bake. You can use the toothpicks as "spacers" to keep the edges apart, and then easily pull them out the side once everything is baked. (Depending on how tight and broad you want the spiral to be, you may need to use a mini-muffin pan instead.) You may also want to add a light coating of ...


6

This is the way I cook bacon and it almost always gives me flat bacon: Put the bacon in a cold pan. Put the pan on the stove and turn it to medium heat. Let the fat slowly render out and fry the bacon on its own. Cook to your desired crispness The gradual heating helps the bacon maintain its shape and is the best way to cook bacon, IMO.


6

The bacon has some moisture, while cooking the water that gets out of the bacon reacts explosively with hot oil (as it quickly turns to steam) and causes the oil to bubble. Similarly other substances when cooked change phase quickly and turn to gas forming the bubbles and splashing. See this for more detailed explanations.


6

It really depends on how you're planning on using the bacon: If you're going to be crumbling it anyway, you can cut it across the strips, and drop it into a pan and slowly render it, then turn up the heat to let it crisp. You might also need to drain the grease part way through. If you're willing to take a loss in flavor ... you can separate it into slices ...


5

As the oven heats up, the bacon will slowly warm, and slowly start to render its fat. This minimizes the curling from shrinkage. It is not absolutely necessary, and makes the total time to the bacon being done shorter, if you start timing from when the oven is turned on. For more insight, see the various answers to Cooking Buffet-style Bacon


5

My wife and I have been using the same mason jar of bacon grease for probably 4 years now. We strain the bacon grease through cheesecloth in a strainer. Occasionally we'll heat the whole jar in the microwave to melt it, and pour the good stuff off, leaving the sediment. Its pretty clear. Every time I use it, I have a sniff, and it hasn't started smelling bad ...


5

Moving to answer for OP. If you want to save the crispiness, or a least some of it, the suggestions of sprinkling small pieces at serving time would seem the way to go. It will give you the noticeable contrast and even draw attention to the bacon while not over-powering the base chili flavors. The added bonus that eckes points out is that it gives the ...


5

First of all, it is difficult to get right. Don't be disappointed if you need some time to learn how to do it well. As for your method, there are two things in your description you can improve on. One is the fat. You need a lot of fat to fry in a stainless steel pan. The bacon grease is unreliable even if you have the rest of the process perfected, and ...


5

This is something i've also struggled with. I find that the traditional way of preparing bacon where I'm from (the US) sacrifices flavor and texture for "crunch". This has given me an undeserved reputation for liking "bacon sushi". I think the easiest route is the "low and slow" method already suggested by pete, but i'd also like to suggest another solution ...


4

This is very old practical way to get flat bacon - take your cold water bottle from the fridge, pour into a dish or pan, and let the strips of bacon lay in the coolness. In just a few minutes, the cool water will work its magic. Then cook. It will come out flat every single time. This is an old trick from my great grandmother. Don't dirty up a bunch of ...


4

In order to get crispy bacon you need to start with the right type. In the USA what most people consider bacon is from the belly, whereas in other parts of the world bacon is from the loin. You can get this in the states as Canadian bacon. You can't make loin bacon crispy and believe me I've tried. However you can get belly bacon most places (presuming bacon ...


4

I use two methods for bacon, depending on how much I am trying to make: For small batches, I use a cast iron pan. I place the bacon on the pan cold, and cook over medium heat, turning and swapping strips around as necessary to cook evenly. I find it easier to control sticking with the cold pan over a preheated one. I do not add oil because there is so much ...


4

I've cooked plenty of crispy bacon in plenty of ovens— gas and electric, commercial and home, with and without convection— and I really doubt the browning of bacon could be noticeably retarded by trace amounts of moisture from the gas. A common trick to getting crispier bacon involves generously sprinkling water on the tray before cooking so it will render ...


4

If we are talking about bacon in these terms: I believe it's because of the meat content difference. American bacon has a much higher fat-to-meat ratio and it's usually thinner, so when you microwave it the thin meat gets crispy (which is, arguably, a good thing in this case). Canadian and UK bacon have much more meat, and if you microwave it the meat will ...


4

Fat can be filtered through a coffee filter. It's slow, but it works. Make sure the fat stays well above the temperature at which it congeals. Alternatively, you can "wash" the fat by mixing it well with some boiling water and then letting it cool and separate. The impurities (at least, the particulate matter) should go into the water and be more easily ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible