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41

Unfortunately, the function depends on the manufacturer. While turning off a set of elements may be common, another option is that the setting may just increase the cook time. Bagels are thicker and have more mass than sliced bread, so a longer toast time is necessary to have a similar level of toasting. In particular there are Cuisinart toasters where ...


31

Bagels tend to flatten when you remove them from the water if the dough is overproofed or you boiled them for too long. Next time, let them proof for shorter time in the fridge (I find that doughs get overproofed in the refrigerator after about 12 hours, so 24 hours is a very long cold proof) and possibly boil them slightly shorter.


30

The bagel setting deactivates or lowers the power on the outer heating elements. This has the effect of toasting the cut surface of the bagel while only warming the outer surface. Generally it's the inner elements that get up to toasting temperature.


21

Buy or make fresh bagels and store them uncut in a plastic bag with the air squeezed out of it in the freezer for up to one month. When you want to prepare a "like fresh" bagel, run it briefly under water (I used filtered water) so that the outside crust is damp but not soggy. Wrap it tightly in foil with a small vent, 1/2" long by 1/8" wide, on one side and ...


14

Besides Johanna's overproofing hypothesis (which I find very likely), it seems you boiled them straight from the fridge. I would never do that, dough behaves much better when it is allowed a long warm up step after having been in the fridge. I don't think the gluten content of the flour contributed anything to the deflation. While bagels are indeed made with ...


11

First, it depends on whether your malt syrup is diastatic or non-diastatic. (Diastatic contains active enzymes; most syrups are non-diastatic because the process to create syrups usually involves heat that destroys the active enzymes. However, this is not universally true.) Diastatic malt's active enzymes help convert starch into sugar. Some bread or ...


10

I understand this is kids, and they like things just the way they like them. But preheating an oven takes time you might not have. For me I'd defrost overnight in the fridge, then in the morning split and toast them. To get closer to fresh-baked I'd turn the oven on to a lower temperature (no more than about 150°C/300°F) and put them in almost ...


8

It sounds like your yeast never really got started, and you may have killed most of it off. Sugar actually retards yeast, and salt kills it, so mixing sugar and salt into the water was not a good thing, in fact it didn't kill off the yeast completely it probably did most of it. So you started off with very little live yeast, which has knock on effects. Cold ...


8

I have a Dualit toaster and the 'bagel' setting switches off elements on specific sides of each slot, allowing you to toast only the cut side of a bagel or English muffin, which is the norm. If you wish to toast both sides, just use the normal setting.


5

The main purpose of adding things to the boil are to promote browning and flavor. The texture of the crust is more a product of gelatinizing the starches by boiling, using a high oven temp, and using a good amount of steam during baking. You can increase browning two main ways, by promoting the Maillard reaction and/or promoting caramelization. Baking ...


4

Preheat your oven to medium heat, approx 350 F or so, pass your [uncut!] bagel quickly under running water (i.e. don't soak it), and pop it into the oven for a few minutes, like maybe 5. Bagels go through a boiling phase anyway, when they are made, so a little water contact on their outer surface won't hurt them.


4

I sometimes do this if I feel really fancy: Put them into the microwave for a little while (like 20s at 600W for each piece). This will make them soft in the center. Follow up with a couple minutes in the oven with the top heating element turned to full blast. I actually do this in the microwave as well because mine has a regular heater on top as well. I ...


4

Those look like great bagels, as a native New Yorker living abroad in a place with no bagels I both salute and envy your results! I have also been baking my own to get my fix. Baking bread on a wire rack is generally a bad idea, and a very bad idea with bagels. Bagels are very sticky because you boil them, this gelatinizes the outer layer of the dough, ...


4

Toasting is a form of browning, and browning requires temperatures in the neighborhood of 300 F (150 C…see Maillard reaction). There are at least two things that impede this progress when toasting a bread product: mass, and water. The more mass the bread has, the more heat is required to be absorbed to raise the temperature of the bread by some amount. So ...


4

Sugar is hydrophilic (literally, 'water loving'). This is useful in some baked goods -- sugar will help to keep them moist, but in this case, it sounds like you're in a high-humidity area where it's pulling too much water out of the air. My only suggestion would be to squeeze as much air out of the bags before sealing them, to avoid trapping moisture in ...


4

It doesn't matter as far as rise or flavor is concerned. You can cold rise the dough, or the shaped bagels, or both. However, the advantage of cold-rising the shaped bagels is that the cold dough is easier to peel off and dunk in the boiling water than room-temp dough is. Bagel dough tends to be sticky and soft, and it's challenging to avoid stretching ...


3

Malted syrup is a form of sugar (maltose). Malted barley flour is flour that has been partially germinated (sprouted) which increases your dough's ability to convert starch into sugar (maltose), making your bagel softer and more moist. Both will increase maltose levels in your bagels: one directly and one indirectly. I would probably try reducing some of the ...


3

So I actually do this all the time, because my local bagelery only makes pumpernickel on Fridays, so I buy a bunch and freeze them. In fact, I am about to do this in a few days for our traditional Christmas Morning Bagel Breakfast. After experimenting with several different approaches, this is the one I've found to work best: Storage: As soon as they are ...


3

You're missing a step. You have to let them proof after forming them into rings. Just like how for bread making you always have to double proof, or else it'll be like pizza or pita dough. After that they should be fine, just take care not to handle them too aggressively while moving to and from the boiling water (Again, just like bread. You deflate the ...


3

I understand both types of garlic bagels: The garlic on the outside is the fast food version and the garlic on the inside is roasted garlic that dissolves into the dough (the later being the original garlic bagels that were in the deli's before bagels became mainstream). To make the fast food version use the dried granulated garlic - and you need bagel ...


3

Had same problem until I found out that I was killing the yeast by applying salt directly to the yeast. I would put the ingredients in a certain order yeast, flour, and last salt. This way the flour will provide a barrier against the salt. This seemed to have worked as the dough had a visible rise.


3

baking soda (or even better, baked baking soda...see: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/15/dining/15curious.html?_r=0 is commonly used at home to make soft pretzels. I would use sugar, unless you want that distinctive pretzel flavor for your bagels.


3

I like the first answer, but feel the need to clarify the 'pepperoni' reference. Yes, they are slices of bagels. However, if you cut a bagel vertically in half as it rests flat and treat each half as if you were slicing a curved salumi, all of your chips will be inconsistently thick on one edge and thin on the other (thanks to the properties of a torus). ...


3

Bagel chips are just bagels sliced into little rounds- think bagel pepperoni. I know of a few different ways to make them, but generally you just bake or toast the rounds (you can butter each slice a little bit or drizzle olive oil over them before baking) until crispy. Here's a good recipe. I'd personally recommend using egg bagels, they have an excellent ...


2

After boiling, drain the bagels and then press the top of the bagel firmly into a dish containing the seed of your choice. Too much water still on the surface of the bagel and they won't adhere properly. This is how they did it at a bagel shop I worked at, and here's a corroborating video: http://videos.sorensonmedia.com/San+Francisco+Baking+Institute/7.2+...


2

Well to make the bagels like the one in the top picture first you have to dice/mince fresh garlic..you can buy the jar but need to place them in between paper towels and place in fridge or elsewhere to dry out some. You want all visible liquid gone and the towels should be dry. Then you boil your bagels like normal when the come out and are on the pan for ...


1

It sounds to me like you've already diagnosed the problem. Just to cover the basics, though, here's some of the reasons why bagels are unsightly, based on my personal experience making bagels and a few internet resources (links below): Failure to knead the dough adequately, leading to inadequate gluten development. Overhandling of the dough while shaping ...


1

It is essential to allow the bagels to cool completely before slicing. The recipe says at least 30 minutes, but my experience suggests longer might be needed: if you slice too early you'll get a gummy inside, since it's still saturated with water vapour, rather than the chewy texture you want.


1

I would expect that substitution to work fine, in a 1:1 swap. Both Brown Rice Syrup (what you're calling Maltose) and Barley Malt have a high amount of maltose-the-sugar, plus an assortment of other sugars. Both are pretty close to pure glucose in their actual sugar content, while at the same time tasting less sweet because of their composition and some of ...


1

For home cooked bagels, save the malt for the dough, about a tbsp for 4 bagels works for me or 270 g flour 150 g water, and just put a tsp or two of baking soda plus a tbsp of salt in the water bath. I do 15 sec on each side, no more no less. Just made a batch this morning but had to leave out the malt (use malted milk in a pinch), but adding other flavors ...


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