52

The main reasons are speed and convenience. Yeast takes longer (even "instant" yeast) and requires more maintenance: waiting for dough to rise, etc. But those are the historical reasons for the adoption for baking powder. Since it became common, another reason emerged: that is, it's very difficult if not impossible to get some kinds of texture and crumb ...


51

Baking powder contains starch, which is insoluble. Baking soda is completely soluble Take a small bowl, and put 1/8 tsp of the substance in the bottom. Add water. If the substance is bicarbonate of soda, the solution will be completely clear. If it is baking powder, a cloudy/powdery residue will remain. (You can also use excess vinegar which gives the ...


29

Water is a great solvent for polar molecules. Sugar, table salt, and other small polar molecules are water soluble. When you put them into water, you get a sugar resp. salt solution. Other molecules are not soluble in water. Most organic molecules with a carbohydrate tail are insoluble (unless they have a strongly polar active group, like the shorter ...


27

Baking powder contains baking soda, plus acidic ingredient(s). If you have cream of tartar, you can make baking powder directly: 2 parts cream of tartar 1 part baking soda 1 part corn starch Without cream of tartar, you can substitute baking soda for baking powder as long as you have an acid in your recipe, like buttermilk. If your recipe does not ...


25

The existing answers already explain why yeast and baking powder won't work together. But even if they did, you wouldn't have a reason to use them. You seem to think that fluffiness depends on the amount of gas produced by the leaveners. In fact, it depends on both the gas and the ability of the dough to trap that gas. If you produce too much gas (no ...


23

Everything @Cascabel says in her answer is correct--I wanted to elaborate on why it is true. In order for a yeast raised bread to work, since the yeast generates the raising gas (carbon dioxide) slowly over time, it has to stay trapped for a long time. This requires a good gluten network. The gluten network is like little rubber balloons throughout the ...


23

Lick your finger Dip it in the jar Lick finger again. If it tastes of: Soap: Soda Very faintly of soap and faintly of starch and slightly fizzes in your mouth: Baking powder


22

1. Chemical leaveners There are two "oldfashioned" chemical leaveners, both still used today in traditional German and Scandinavian gingerbread recipes: Potassium carbonate (potash or pearl ash) and Ammonium bicarbonate (salt of heartshorn) They do have their own quirks and pitfalls, but if nothing else is available... If you can get baking soda, mix ...


17

You might want to have a read through Why use yeast instead of baking powder? to fully understand the differences between yeast and baking powder. The short summary is that baking powder tastes bad if there's enough to taste, but it's a lot easier and faster to use. But either one provides enough leavening to do pretty much whatever you want. Given that, the ...


17

As long as they're all dry ingredients, then you should be just fine — after all, that's exactly what a box of packaged cake mix is. Again, if it's just dry ingredients, I see no need to refrigerate it. I would put it in an airtight container — preferably a glass jar*. Placed in your pantry, it should have a shelf-life of a least a couple of months. * ...


15

I completely agree with Cascabel's answer. I do want to add a bit. Salt is an amazing flavor enhancer and most (sweet) baked goods use very little (1/4 to 1 tsp) considering that most of the recipes make 12-24 servings (more for cupcakes/cookies etc) but it does make a difference. Most baked desserts gain quite a bit from having the added salt... and they ...


14

Yes, I have found several sources that say that citric acid is about 4 times the strength of cream of tartar. So, mix 1 teaspoon of baking soda and 1/2 teaspoon of citric acid and use a 1/2 teaspoon of the mixture. That should work. Let us know! EDIT: Oops, I should have mentioned this before the OP accepted. Hopefully, he'll realize, or see this. That ...


14

In addition to Athanasius's excellent answer, the other reason to choose chemical over yeast leavening is the composition and proportion of the other ingredients. Yeast is an organism that requires a certain balance in order to reproduce and yield the CO2 that makes dough rise. Banana bread and other quickbreads often have an abundance of sugar. While ...


13

For 1 cup self-raising flour, add 1½ tsp baking powder+ ¼ tsp salt to 1 cup all purpose flour. (http://www.joyofbaking.com/IngredientSubstitution.html) Edit: Calculation added by Sebbidychef: According to http://www.jsward.com/cooking/conversion.shtml 1 cup of un-sifted all-purpose flour is equal to 120g. Therefore 1000 divided by 120 is 8.3 recurring (...


13

Double Acting Baking powder has baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) AND two acids it in Single Acting only has one acid You can use this property to test by mixing the unknown substance with some plain water (tap is fine). The mixture might start to bubble slowly, as one of the acids in baking powder will start to act when mixed with water and is now able to ...


11

In baking, salt is generally only for flavor: things won't taste as good without it. So you can reduce it or leave it out if you want, just be aware that you may sacrifice some flavor. This shouldn't have anything to do with the baking powder. Baked goods that don't use baking powder usually contain salt as well.


10

Yorkshire puddings rise because of the eggs in them. This means that the mixture for you Yorkshire puddings needs heat to rise So if your oven is not hot enough, they won't rise as much as you want. So here are some tips: -make sure your oven is hot before putting your puddings in -Don't open the oven while cooking your puddings -I always pre heat the ...


10

There are two reasons (that have also been discussed in many other questions) Baking powder isn't just sodium bicarbonate + acid. It often also contains aluminum compounds that release gas when they are heated. That means they will make bubbles not just when the batter is mixed but also when it is baking. Baking powder is ph neutral while baking soda is ...


10

Mix some with water. Baking soda will do nothing. Baking powder will bubble somewhat


9

For baking, you may be able to find flour with leaveners already mixed in. Look for self-rising or self-raising flour. Note that in the US at least, self-rising flour also has salt added.


7

According to David Lebovitz: Because natural cocoa powder hasn’t had its acidity tempered, it’s generally paired with baking soda (which is alkali) in recipes. Dutch-process cocoa is frequently used in recipes with baking powder, as it doesn’t react to baking soda like natural cocoa does. So, if you're using non-Dutched (natural) cocoa, you can use ...


7

The main problem with adding the baking powder last would be getting it evenly incorporated throughout the dough or batter. In the traditional methods where it is in the dry ingredients, it can be sifted or whisked evenly throughout the dry mixture which facilitates having it evenly distributed in the final batter. If you tried adding the powder to a ...


7

The baking powder undergoes a chemical reaction which produces small gas bubbles in the batter. The bubbles break up the batter coating (sort of like the geometry inside a sponge) so you wind up with a mass of little holes each surrounded by a thin layer of bready material, and it all fries up airy, light and crispy; instead of one thick, dense, hard shell ...


6

I would just note that salt does sometimes play other roles in baking, particularly in yeast breads (but also in relatively lean doughs raised chemically, like soda bread). Salt concentration slows down yeast growth, and it can also alter gluten formation early on. It can also affect final texture and even browning to some extent (as a side effect). It is ...


6

Baking powder and baking soda ARE NOT THE SAME THING. Baking powder is a mix of soda and an acid that reacts to produce gas that will leaven (rise) the cake. Baking soda is only 1/2. It has a high pH which will cause proteins to be weak and also cause the cakes to be dark. Cream of Tartar is an acid which will react with the soda to help produce ...


6

The primary benefit of baking powder is speed. You don't have to wait hours dough to rise from yeast. Baking powder causes a chemical reaction that releases gas for leavening.


6

Baking soda is sodium bicarbonate, a mineral. Left to itself in a clean and dry place, it will remain unchanged for billions of years. In particularly wet or polluted environments it may react with chemicals in the air and become unpleasant for use in food, which you can detect by smell. Baking powder is a combination of baking soda and tartaric acid, which ...


5

My Tibetan friends make a yeast dough, then adds a little baking powder while rolling it out.This gives the steamed dumpling dough more resiliency.


5

I have been using baking powder in yeast bread dough for a little while now. I dont use much, for about 3-4 cups of flour, I add maybe half a table spoon. The thing I have noticed what it does to the dough, is changes the density quite a bit. I had baked quite a bit of bread with just yeast, and no matter how long you let it rise, and rest, I was never able ...


5

For all practical purposes, yes. Just don't let moisture get near them. Both are a single chemical compound which does not react with air. The only thing you have to worry about is entropy, and it will not do anything bad for the next few decades. It doesn't matter if you mix and use the day after buying or years later, unlike the mix, which ages because ...


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