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No, you cannot use baking powder to dip pretzels. To get their characteristic color and crust, pretzels are traditionally boiled in lye. Another alkaline solution, i.e. those containing a base, can be used as well. Let's look at how baking soda and powder are used as leavers: Baking soda is a base (namely sodium bicarbonate) that releases carbon dioxide gas ...


3

As a 4 carbon sugar alcohol, erythritol lacks both strongly acid and strongly basic groups. pH of a 1 molar solution will run around 7. It is not going to affect the pH of a solution when you add erythritol. It will affect osmolarity, and water activity but those are different properties.


3

The first "action" is when it gets wet. This is the traditional baking soda + vinegar fizzing. The second rise in double-acting baking powder is when it gets hot. In a baked item, such as a cake, this reaction to mosture helps create rise immediately, before the cake starts to change structure, solidify, and form a crust. This enables the center to begin ...


2

This answer suggests that you can substitute ascorbic acid for cream of tartar at a 0.75:1 ratio. However, the answer does not cite how it arrived at that ratio. It's not an unreasonable idea though, since the pH of ascorbic acid is much lower than that of tartaric acid -- that is, it's more acidic. I lack the chemistry math to say if the 75% substitution ...


2

I added baking powder to a small amount of additional meal with some water to make it more liquid than solid, then I poured it into/onto the dough and remixed everything together. Thus I had a brand new dough with the baking powder.


1

The main rationale for an early reaction is to help create small bubbles during the final part of mixing that contribute to the fine structure of baked goods, as well as to add balance to the rate at which bubbles expand during baking. Details: There are practical chemical reasons for doing this: a lot of the standard ingredients used to make simple baking ...


1

I recently used a recipe from King Arthur Flour for cinnamon streusel coffee cake with the same instruction. I've never seen any other recipe call for it, but I did it. The result was a cake with only a few fully-raised places. Ugh. Also, as I understand the chemistry, it is not moisture per se that causes the initial rise from the baking soda component in ...


1

Mixing 2 part of baking soda with 1 part citric acid is a great substitute for baking powder. I tested it on a biscotti recipe and the taste was excellent!


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