33

No, you cannot use baking powder to dip pretzels. To get their characteristic color and crust, pretzels are traditionally boiled in lye. Another alkaline solution, i.e. those containing a base, can be used as well. Let's look at how baking soda and powder are used as leavers: Baking soda is a base (namely sodium bicarbonate) that releases carbon dioxide gas ...


6

The temperature needs to be high enough, that's all. 450°F should work fine. (2-5 hours is a little silly, since the reaction is pretty quick once the baking soda itself is up to temperature.) If you want to check that everything's gone okay, you can weigh the powder before and after. If it's converted properly, its mass should decrease to 63% (EDIT: fixed ...


5

In addition to leavening, baking soda increases the PH of the dough. Since your recipe uses sourdough starter, it may be fairly acidic. Adding baking soda will make the dough less acidic. The PH level, in turn, is important for browning: a high PH level facilitates the Maillard reaction, giving you brown and toasty crackers.


4

To answer the question in the second paragraph: Baking soda is a chemical, sodium bicarbonate, not a microbe, so it is always "active" so long as it is still baking soda. Once baking soda is "activated" it chemically transforms into something else through an acid-base interaction. First, baking soda must dissolve in water. This is the important part! Acid-...


3

160 °C (320 °F) for 1-2 h worked for me once, but higher temperatures should not hurt the process. If you are starting with dry sodium hydrogen carbonate, the mass should reduce to 63 % of the starting mass (more reduction in case of wet starting material). Explanation for the mass loss number: You are converting two equivalents of sodium hydrogen ...


3

Baking soda decomposes when heated (T above 80 °C) releasing carbon dioxide and water. While other answers cover true or untrue aspects, baking soda and other chemical leavures formulation work even without acid/base reactions and without letting the dough stands for raising. I would say that in addition to the raising due to the starter, your crackers ...


2

I regularly use baking soda for that purpose to protect what is remaining of my enamel. To allow for the increase in volume as a result of any foaming, use a large container so that the top of the liquid does not go higher than the 3/4 mark. It is also advisable to leave it overnight in the fridge to let the baking soda dissolve completely. The taste is ...


1

Baking soda is ok but what I found work better is honey. Especially in dishes that gain from sugar. Like for example tomato sauce. Sugar neutralize the acidic while not adding extra taste (like soda does) but just the sweetens that can embellish herbs. Honey (especially if you have honeydew honey that have this natural "forest" feel).


1

TIL Sherbet powder... According to Wikipedia, you mix and match other carbonates "...And the base may be sodium bicarbonate, sodium carbonate, magnesium carbonate,or a mixture of these and/or other similar carbonates..." Maybe a mix of those will help in making that taste less.


1

A quite readable explaination from a supplier of leavening agents : http://www.lallemand.com/BakerYeastNA/eng/PDFs/LBU%20PDF%20FILES/1_12CHEM.PDF According to them, sodium acid pyrophosphate has indeed a "slow to very slow action, slightly bitter aftertast". But the bicarbonate will produce CO2 when reacting with the acid, regardless of heat. I wouldn't ...


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