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28

There's a big difference between what's possible with bread and with muffins or cakes because bread is from a dough and the rest is a batter. Bread dough has a lot of structure to begin because of the gluten, so you can partially cook it to set that structure and then crisp it up later. You can't do the same with a batter as there's no structure. When you ...


17

The rule of thumb when spiking a ganache is to either reduce the cream by the same amount or add double the amount of chocolate (by weight). So for one ounce of alcohol you either leave out one ounce of cream or add another two ounces of chocolate. That said, yours is a slightly lighter ganache than the usual 1 part cream / 2 parts chocolate and a slight ...


16

There is a great deal of contrary advice on adding salt to egg whites. From my research, what I gather is that this mixed advice comes from the fact that it probably depends on how much salt is added. These researchers found that foam volume and stability increased with a small amount of NaCl, then decreased with increased amounts. This research did not ...


14

Hydration is an idea to help you predict the dough consistency/workability based on the ratio of water to flour - but with a highly enriched dough, the effect of the additional ingredients is so strong, that it loses its predictive value. It is also no longer perfectly defined when you have ingredients which make the dough softer without clearly being water/...


6

The bacon should naturally come out crispy, as the oven cooks the bacon more evenly and the heat surrounds it. You can find here an article that lists a couple of advantages of cooking bacon in the oven including extra crispiness. I think the trick with dishes like “Gotcha Pork” is, to make sure you refrigerate or chill the dish, especially your mash before ...


6

We make the muffin batter, pour it into liners, and freeze in the trays. Thaw overnight, then bake as usual.


5

Yes, you're calculating it right, it's the flour that makes the difference. Hydration percent will give you a different result with different flours. Gluten content and grain type and grind (i.e. fine vs course) all influence how much water a dough will absorb. You are using white AP (i.e. plain) flour which has a lower gluten content than bread flour, if ...


5

I too scoured the internet for methods and found the two methods found in moscafj's answer. However, I found both approaches so frustrating and time consuming that I was considering abandoning homemade chocolate hazelnut spread altogether. In my desperation to get the skins off of a large batch of hazelnuts, I tried something new-- I transferred several of ...


3

Yes you do have to reduce all ingredients proportionally for the dough to come out the same. The best way to measure for baking is by weight in grams rather then in volume as weight in grams is extremely accurate and makes for much easier adjustments like those you need to make. The most critical measurements to get right are the flour and the liquid ...


3

You asked for 'durable'. What's wrong with 'proper' traditional pressed steel? Sure they take a while to season in properly, but after that, they last a lifetime… or two… or three. I'm still using the ones my mum got in the 1950s. Every week for 60-some years. Never stick, never seem to age.


2

The amount of yeast you use heavily depends on your proving time, and vice-versa. You can use either amount, but your proving time will be vastly different. As highlighted in this recipe the fermentation time gets longer the less yeast you use. Basically the yeast rises the bread, and the more yeast you use, the quicker it can get it done (like an increased ...


2

Short answer: No, this mix is not the same as all-purpose flour. This product is meant to be the whole of your dry ingredients in the donut recipe and is designed to be used with water, as it contains powdered whey and milk powders, as well as fats. It does not seem to include leaveners and so requires either baking powder/soda or yeast, which the ...


1

I recently took a baking class and learned that baking soda and baking powder could add flavor to cookie dough. They add a depth that's almost like adding a squeeze of lemon juice over your salad to put it into the words of Christina Tossi (Mikbar Founder). Baking soda might make something taste metallic, but because it double activates (makes something rise ...


1

Baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) is an alkaline compound. As such, it tastes bitter and metallic. It is often used in amounts where you can’t perceive that, but if you slip up it can be quite noticeable. There are various substitutions, the most common is to add cream of tartar to baking soda (1/2tsp cream of tartar + 1/4 tsp of soda to sub for 1 tsp. ...


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