Hot answers tagged

8

Not only is this possible, I have done it. One of my favorites, in fact. But the most palatable version I've made varies a little bit from apple pie - rather than just tossing cinnamon sugar with the filling all willie nillie, I slice the squash very thin, line it against the edge of the crust, and keep working to the center. Think of it as like a tarte ...


5

Many apple pie recipes bake for over an hour. That would be plenty of time to cook pumpkin.


5

Yes, heating to boiling temperature will destroy amylase. Depending on the ratio, the goal of that recipe may be to destroy the enzymes, to gel the starch, or to help the enzymes be most effective. It’s not uncommon for particularly old and traditional recipes to use a combination of boiling water, ice-cold water, and room-temperature ingredients to reach a ...


2

I make several recipes of muffins for a monthly fundraiser (banana nut, pumpkin cream cheese, cappuccino chocolate chip with cream cheese topping). I mix all the dry ingredients 3 days before and the same for the wet with the exception of the eggs, and one calls for buttermilk & bananas. I assemble everything at 5:am at the event kitchen with several ...


2

If you try to make a bread exclusively or almost exclusively out of oats, you are missing good gluten formation. Oats are gluten-free(1), so won‘t be able to develop the network that traps the CO2 from your yeast like a wheat bread does and what you made was (slightly sloppily phrased) baked oatmeal. Most bakers will tell you that you need a minimum ...


2

Every fat prevents gluten formation as much as any other fat. At least, if there are any differences, they are not noticeable by somebody eating a finished product. When substituting fats, "how much it inhibits gluten" is not a criterion. Just pick whatever fits your recipe.


2

This is quite a shot in the dark with the minimal information, but I will give it a try. My best guess is that you already have all the ingredients you need: butter, sugar and flour. What you are missing is probably the ratio. The dark edge with the crisp texture and the nutty flavor is very likely sugar that has self-caramelized in melting butter (similar ...


1

I find Stephie's link fascinating, but also very much a "kids don't try this at home" thing. For me, it is only something that a hardcore baker enthusiast would do - somebody who has been there, seen it all, is bored by the usual ways of baking, and wants to push the envelope, challenge himself by trying to work with very difficult constraints, and ...


1

Stephie's comment shows the real issue: oats do not have gluten (strictly speaking, they lack the proteins gliadin and glutenin that react in the presence of water to form gluten), so when you swapped out 80% whole wheat for oats, there was almost nothing to give the loaf structure. Basically you made baked porridge with a bread crust. Another way to get an ...


1

Assuming you want to keep the recipe as close as possible to the original, you could simply replace the 3 cups of sweetened shredded coconut by sweetening yourself 3 cups of unsweetened shredded coconut. Here, as an example, this is a recipe to sweeten 1 cup of unsweetened shredded coconut. You can find the details and adjust the recipe to make 3 cups. Keep ...


1

Do the first couple of book turns straight away when dough first made. The chill for 20 and repeat 3 times to make 5 turns. I freeze and blitz the butter first to make it like tiny gravel. That's the secret.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible