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Gluten is what makes a dough stick together and have structure. Coconut flour has no gluten, so the resulting dough will be a crumbly mess. Intentionally gluten free recipes usually contain any number of special additives to compensate for the lack of gluten.


8

You still need some gluten, otherwise the cake will crumble. Any recipe that is gluten free has to use a number of different additives to mimic the structure provided by the gluten. If you just replaced the flour with cornstarch, your cake or pastry would not be able to rise (it would lack the internal structure to "inflate") and likely crumble as ...


8

From PrimalPal: Because it doesn't contain gluten like many flours, coconut flour doesn't stick together as well as traditional flour – this means you'll have to use extra eggs. Also note that coconut flour is relatively high in fat, causing the different texture.


5

the reason you haven't found any recipes for soggy sweet potato fries is because of one simple fact: soggy is the default state for oven fries, unless you do something to specifically make the crispy. So, in search of non-crispy fries, here is a list of things you could try: Cook at a low temperature; over 400°f makes crispy fries, so closer to 350°f will ...


5

A filling made with butter will melt at baking temperatures, and probably spill out of your cookies, or at the very least stop the cookie dough from baking properly (it will either soak the dough with moisture, break open the cookie with steam, or both) and not reform into the filling you want. Instead, you should look into making hollow cookies and piping ...


4

James Peterson, in his book Fish & Shellfish, recommends char, blackfish, grouper, ocean perch, rockfish, small salmon, trout, steelhead, and striped bass, but not pollock. However, he does say "almost any round fish can be prepared this way", and pollock is a round fish. I suspect that the reasons that you don't see pollock suggested for ...


4

They are different ingredients and one does not replace the other. Baking soda is an alkali which can react with acidic ingredients in a recipe to produce carbon dioxide which helps baked goods rise. Baking powder includes baking soda (or similar) and an acidic ingredient, so it is more 'self-contained' rather than relying on something else in the recipe. (...


3

If your rolls came out too dark, you probably baked them too hot and/or too long. Note that the recipe states 180°C to 200°C and some ovens run hotter than others. (A separate oven thermometer is a good investment in general, even more so if you see something like that occasionally.) So as a first step, reduce the oven temperature a bit and watch the time. ...


3

That happened to me as well. Luckily it doesn't change the taste, but it is annoying! It comes from air pockets which formed because you whisked/mixed your cake batter too intensely, and/or for too long, which creates air bubbles. So first, it is best to mix your ingredients delicately, try to avoid incorporating too much air (easier said than done), and ...


3

Ok found it. they're called pull-me-up cakes or tsunami cakes or in my opinion quite ambiguously, doll cakes.


2

Yes, this is the oldest way to make bread for the morning - you just need to use less yeast to avoid "over proving". My recipe below is for an enriched loaf but for a "traditional" more sourdough-tasting bread just leave out the sugar/oil. I make a batch of this every week so it's tried and tested. I use 3/4 wholemeal to white bread flour ...


2

If I understand your question, each cake has 1/2 of the batter. If that's the case, each cake is smaller, so it will bake faster. You will need to reduce the baking time, but it's difficult to tell by how much, especially without knowing how deep the layer of batter is in your pans compared to the one used by the author of the recipe. Usually the bake time ...


1

Everything in your recipe is safe at room temperature. If you are talking about hours (even 24 hours), there is no safety issue. If you are talking about a longer period of time (days?), your likely risks would be mold growth, or rancidity.


1

Here's a life hack for you: When heating your oil, constantly poke a chopstick into the heating oil to touch the bottom of the pot/fryer. When micro bubbles begin to come out of the tip of the chopstick when you make it touch the bottom of the pot in the oil, it should be the right temperature to fry soggy fires. If you are going to use the standard frying ...


1

If you bake a slightly undersized loaf for the pan, you won't have to trim much off, just enough for it to sit flat - maybe even that wouldn't be needed. But I'd regard that as a first step - do that once or twice to get the quantity, then bake with a baking sheet over the top, so that the loaf expands against a flat surface. With a yeast bread I'd probably ...


1

No, there is no specific temperature you need to reach. Once the sugar is dissolved (which will happen well below boiling temperature) you’re done.


1

I'm guessing this is for some type of fudge or praline? There are a lot of variables that can change the crystallization of sugar when making a sugar syrup. Things like temperature, how clean your pot is, whether a wooden spoon is wet, how fast and when you stir, etc. Using an interfering agent like butter or cream helps prevent the solution from creating ...


1

Cook for less time. The exact same brownie recipe can be delectably fudgy or horribly cake-like from a difference of 5 minutes in the cooking time.


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Stella Parks recipe will curve right out of the oven. You have about 45 seconds until it starts hardening. Use ov-gloves or something similar bc the dough is SUPER HOT.


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