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28

A microwave can cook a beef steak or piece of chicken to a safe temperature and make it edible, however the result is often tough and you won't get a crust of any kind on it. When you cook something on a pan or on a grill/broiler the outside is exposed to a high temperature, giving the outside a chance to go through chemical changes like Maillard reactions ...


23

Many beginners in the kitchen get advice along the lines of “you can play around with cooking, but baking recipes shouldn’t be changed or you risk failure” or something similar. This is only partially true. Whenever you consider substitutions, you need to consider what the purpose of the given ingredient is. This will help in finding the answer to the “can ...


19

By itself? Not really, the results will end up edible (i.e. fully cooked) but not very tasty (chewy, no searing/caramelization). However, there are dedicated "microwave grill" devices like the Microhearth Grill Pan (others might be better, google will help, this is just the one I have experience with) that you can put into your microwave oven. They convert ...


16

Some people say that it gives a lighter texture, while others say it gives a more rubbery/tougher texture (due to more gluten being developed). I would challenge the notion that these two aspects are necessarily opposed. Lighter doesn't necessarily mean "softer" or "more tender"; in cakes, it generally means "rising higher with more air." The way that ...


11

Maybe not an answer. I'd try to collect as much NY Cheesecake recipes as possible and see what are the common parts and what variations there are between them. In one of your example, recipes I've looked at are quite liberal in what can be used as crust. For example, this recipe suggests "...graham cracker, digestive biscuits, or vanilla wafer crumbs..." ...


8

You may need to cook for a little longer because your ingredients are piled a bit deeper, but it should work more or less unmodified.


6

Gluten is formed when the glutenin and gliadin, proteins naturally found in wheat, are combined with water. Milk certainly contains a large proportion of water...85 - 95%, in fact. This paper suggests that milk contributes "water and nutrients...helps browning...and adds flavor." It does go on to state (about yeast doughs) that the "quality of the dough" ...


5

I'd mix a small amount of your cheesecake batter with your strawberry component to help with it's bake stability. Try that and swirl that in. Hope that helps.


4

I don't think there is a baking reason behind the design. Here is a loaf pan from 1897, for example. Perhaps the popularity of the rectangular loaf can be traced back to the Pullman Palace Car Company in 1868. In the same article the author points out that early 18th century European bakers were using square tin pans to create loaves with minimal crust. I ...


4

The bottom surface of the pan will expand as it heats. The edges will also expand but they won’t be able to expand as much as the bottom surface. This will cause the warping, even cracking. As you have mentioned one way of avoiding this is having one or two edges, as the cookie sheets would have. These pans will not create such tension as the surfaces of ...


4

First of all, just about any food of reasonable size is safe to be cooked in a microwave, assuming you do it correctly. I heard that meat isn't safe to bake or grill in microwave because there may be tiny areas that contain less moisture and hence not cooked though as microwave cooks moving water molecules. I'm not sure what the source is for this, ...


4

There's not going to be a good way to cook a "steak" (I assume you mean a chicken filet, or a single large-ish piece of chicken without bones), but you may be able to make do with something close. Microwaves do one particular kind of cooking well: steaming. Chicken doesn't taste great steamed, but it's not terrible, either. As long as you add some ...


4

Ken Forkish's Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast has a brief note on storing baked bread (page 77). I got over my aversion to storing bread in plastic bags many years ago, after trying all the alternatives and realizing nothing else keeps the bread as well. The crust will soften, but the bread won't dry out. The straight dough breads will keep for two or three ...


3

Adding any or all of your suggestions -- milk, butter, and/or eggs -- will likely soften the resulting bread. They will also cause it to remain softer for a longer period of time. But they will also tend to change the flavor and texture of your bread. If you're used to baking a crusty bread with only flour, water, yeast, and salt, the bread with enriching ...


3

Batters are not shelf stable. It doesn't matter if their ingredients are shelf stable by themselves or not. So you have to follow the basic food safety rules for non-shelf-stable food. In particular, you have to ensure (no matter by what means) that it doesn't spend more than 4 hours with an internal temperature between 4 and 60 degrees Celsius. If you can ...


3

The first "action" is when it gets wet. This is the traditional baking soda + vinegar fizzing. The second rise in double-acting baking powder is when it gets hot. In a baked item, such as a cake, this reaction to mosture helps create rise immediately, before the cake starts to change structure, solidify, and form a crust. This enables the center to begin ...


2

Before you start separating your pie, you need to be sure that your fillings all need the same baking time and temperature. If they are from the same basic recipe and just have some extra flavors, you should be ok, if they are smaller amounts of different recipes, check the instructions carefully or ideally, make them as full pies once and note the actual ...


2

For this, I'll turn to Elizabeth David's English Bread and Yeast Cookery (1977), which is a very useful resource for the history of bread-baking. In a chapter beginning on page 206 entitled "Moulds and Tins for Bread and Yeast Cakes," she begins by noting that: Bread baked in pans or tins of uniform shape and capacity was a late development. Indeed, ...


2

I make naan on my BGE all the time. You can't replicate a tandoor, however, the results are very good. I find it best to cook the naan directly on the grill, and over the coals. I find lower heat is best. I either bake them at the end of a grill session, when the heat is dying, or I completely close the bottom vent (leaving the lid open...not just the lid ...


2

You could try to cook the ckhicken as-is, but the result will not taste good at all. You could instead use the oven to make a chicken soup. Microvave ovens can heat/boil water if placed in thin-walled porcelain container, such as a bowl. Separate the chicken into pieces that fit a porcelain bowl, add water and chicken soup ingredients. Do not leave the ...


2

The other answers here are great but to address your specific question in response to Athanasius' answer, you probably would not want to add either to that specific recipe unless you left out an ingredient and it was calling for one. I am, however, hard-pressed to think of any cake recipes that use water instead of fat for liquid and that is due to what ...


1

Here is advice I found online for adding a swirl into a similar cheesecake recipe: Put the jam and lemon juice in a small saucepan and heat over low heat, stirring often, until melted and smooth. Drizzle 1/4 of the jam mixture in stripes over the batter. Spoon the remaining batter over the jam, then drizzle with the remaining jam. Swirl gently with a thin ...


1

The main rationale for an early reaction is to help create small bubbles during the final part of mixing that contribute to the fine structure of baked goods, as well as to add balance to the rate at which bubbles expand during baking. Details: There are practical chemical reasons for doing this: a lot of the standard ingredients used to make simple baking ...


1

Smaller dish, shorter time… However, there's probably more variance in the oven temp & placement within it to make that much difference anyway. With a lasagne especially, I always make the final judgement by eye. All you need is the top the right colour, everything in a lasagne is already cooked, so unless you pre-made it & are trying to cook ...


1

I don't think there's anything specific to worry about with bread dough. The important point is the temperature: if you're considering adding an ingredient that you normally wouldn't let sit out at room temperature for 18 hours for food safety reasons (and/or because it might start tasting "off"), you probably should add that ingredient toward the end by ...


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