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13

I Googled for "Raadvad" which seemed to be the text embossed on the tool, and found this video suggesting this is a 'bread guillotine'. A subsequent search for "Raadvad bread guillotine" suggests either 'bread guillotine' or, simply, '(Danish/Scandinavian) bread slicer'.


11

You could look into making flatbread, which often (though not always) gets its name through being unleavened, and thus, flat (yes, I am oversimplifying here). Common examples are tortillas or roti.


6

It is unclear what you are asking. If you mean... Can I make bread without buying yeast from the store and adding it, and without the bread tasting yeasty? ...then the answer is definitely "yes". Sourdough bread works perfectly fine without added yeast - the reason being that the sourdough itself contains yeast microorganisms as part of its ...


6

If you want it to be bread, you will need some type of leavening. You can create a starter (think sourdough), which is essentially growing your own yeast and bacteria. This, of course, takes several days until it is useful. Alternately you can use a chemical leavener, like baking powder or baking soda. These obviously result in different types of bread.


5

Right, I'm not a hands-on baking expert, but some of the reasons your gluten may be having trouble are that the gluten-containing flour makes up a quite small proportion of the overall mixture, you have other ingredients (namely: the oil, the fat in the peanut butter, and the wheat bran) that act to minimise your gluten development and there's very little ...


4

Yes, you can use all sorts of pans for chiffon cake and it works just fine. I've made many chiffon cakes and I've never actually used a tube pan as I don't own one! Turning the cake over is absolutely essential, and you can turn just about any pan over as long as it has a fixed bottom or one that locks into place like a springform pan. Don't use a pan with a ...


4

You can actually steam a lot of cakes. The basic idea is seal the cake pan tightly with foil (or even plastic wrap if your can handle the temperature) and then place it in your steamer insert/basket. I find it takes about 40 min for it to cook all the way through. Makes for a super moist and fluffy cake. Here’s a random example I found online. Paper in ...


4

Adding more flour to a bread recipe until it looses stickiness is a mistake many inexperienced bread bakers make, and one I made myself. Dough recipes have a hydration level, which is a way of expressing the amount of water in comparison to flour by weight. A higher hydration level gives a more open texture with bigger holes, lower hydration gives a more ...


3

This will definitely require some experimentation on your part. As a starting point, I recommend comparing the sugar content of the fruit to the sugar content of sugar. Below, I use dates as an example. 48 grams of dates (approximately 2 dates) contains 32 grams of sugar (source) 48 grams of sugar contains 48 grams of sugar (source: common sense) So dates ...


3

Restaurants usually pre-cook (either parboil or parfry) their potatoes and freeze them in serving portions. I would just parboil the potato wedges, then coat with oil and put in oven until golden brown (or just brown-ish). When baking potatoes, I prefer using a metal pan sheet instead of a glass bakeware.


3

I suspect that one of two things is happening: The gears aren't aligned correctly, and they're far enough apart that the teeth are just barely touching, so under load, they start slip rather than mesh up correctly. The sacrificial gear is failing. Basically, there's a gear that's designed to break rather than have forces get transmitted back to the motor ...


3

Typically no. You need much more cocoa powder for a chocolate cake than you need vanilla powder for a vanilla cake. Adding a cup of vanilla would be both very expensive and very overwhelming in terms of flavour. And the vanilla doesn't have the same chemical properties as cocoa. Cocoa has a bit of fat in it, so a substitute should include some fat.


3

There is no exact limit, it's a subjective/linguistic question. With every carrot you add, the proportion of people who recognize your result as "cake" will go down and those who recognize it as something else will go up. That being said, I now checked my preferred books for recipes that do quickbreads and muffins by the volume, and they tend to ...


3

Those white spots are simply flour on the outside of the dough, it would take far longer for mold to develop. It's fine, continue your bake as normal. Leaving sugar out won't hurt anything except the dough will be less sweet.


2

Depends on the beer. In Germany we a beer called "Weißbier" or "Hefeweizen" which you can actually use for baking. The recipe 100ml "Hefeweizen" 15g flour 10g sugar => mix it => after 20h you have the equivalent of 25g yeast


2

Three options, depending on exactly what you mean by "no yeast": No purchased yeast. In this case, you would make a sourdough starter, essentially cultivating your own source of wild yeast from your environment. You'd have a startup time of several days to a week before you could bake a loaf of bread this way. There are any number of directions ...


2

It's possible to make a good pizza on the stovetop (with a lid), but it won't quite have the same consistency as a New York style pizza. Serious Eats had a write-up on 'skillet pizza' years ago. Basically, the idea is that you cook the crust first in the skillet, flipping it twice (so the flat side is on the bottom again), then top it and put a lid on it to ...


2

If you have an option of 'convection' in microwave settings then you can adjust the temperature (in °C or °F) and hence use that as oven. Also cakes/muffins can be made in the same way, in microwave but then in microwave proof vessels. For that you may take a microwave proof container say a square plate, grease it and pour the batter. The plate should have a ...


1

There are two elements responsible for the darkness of “black bread”, which is a term used for different breads all over East, North and Central Europe Whole grain flour, typically rye, but sometimes with a part wheat or spelt. A low and slow bake, the probably most extreme example is Pumpernickel, which needs almost a day at 100-120 C and is more steamed ...


1

This is pure conjecture, as I've not actually tried doing this. Muffins are quickbreads, and as such, are fairly similar to cake. And there are a lot of recipes out there where people make cupcakes n a mug then microwave it. Serious Eat's directions for microwaving a cake in a mug are: Wipe inside rim of cup to remove excess batter. Microwave on High power ...


1

Almost all pizza recipes, like these for Neapolitan or New York style* pizza, require a very hot oven. Crucially, the surface you put your pizza on needs to be very hot to achieve a nice crust. Assuming that you won't be able to fit a pizza stone or pizza steel in your microwave oven, the tandoor is probably better suited for this. Make sure to preheat it ...


1

I do this all the time. Does this make me a bad person? Cut potatoes into wedges or sticks, coat in oil (add spices if required), spread on a baking sheet and bake at 180-200C (depending what else is in the oven) for 20 minutes or so, till they're done, turning once. Also useful for other vegetables; parsnip, carrot, sweet potato... or paprika, zucchini, ...


1

How does this method work? In a hot water crust, when the high temperature of the water and fat emulsion is combined with flour the hot liquid causes some of the starch to gelatinize and swell with water which makes less liquid available to form gluten. This lack of gluten results in a tender pie crust that might be better described as "mealy" when ...


1

There's something else that you may need to test -- how many pans you have in the oven at one time. Most home ovens only have two racks, so you're never cooking more than two sheets of cookies at a time. This means that they'll have radiant heat from either the top of bottom. Some cookie recipes are so sensitive to radiant heat that they'll specifically ...


1

I've gotten an excellent, cider-y apple taste into muffins. (I know you're making a yeast dough, I believe this same method will work with a yeast dough.) Here's how: Take some good-flavored ripe apples, put them in a paper bag and close the top. This seals in some of the gas that encourages ripening, while preventing moisture build-up. Let sit out at room ...


1

A typical conversion I know of is to use 1/3 as much dry yeast as fresh yeast. If we take James McLeod's answer, then a "large" yeast should be replaced with roughly 18 g of dry yeast (close enough to 3 envelopes á 7 g) and a "small" yeast cake should be replaced by 0.2 ounces dry yeast, or 5.6 g yeast (most recipes will tolerate a full 7 ...


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