Hot answers tagged

54

It is less useful than what you think Frame challenge incoming... Cling film is very light and made especially for such purposes. The environmental damage is extremely low - which limits what alternatives you can choose. Most alternatives (including those already mentioned in the other answers) will be so much more resource demanding to make, dispose or ...


34

Yes, in my experience it is almost impossible to coat a marble rolling pin with flour. However, like flour many doughs tend to stick less to the very smooth surface, and because a marble rolling pin can stay colder for a longer time than a wooden one, some doughs get much less sticky, e.g. if they contain lots of butter. If you have problems with dough ...


29

Don't throw it away. Worst case you use up the mystery sweetener on yourself, and use a new pack of Stevia for your wife and anything you share. That's what I recommend if you're not convinced by my solution or don't have sensitive kitchen scales. At room temperature, sucrose (normal sugar) is very soluble in water: about 200 g of sugar will dissolve ...


28

A microwave can cook a beef steak or piece of chicken to a safe temperature and make it edible, however the result is often tough and you won't get a crust of any kind on it. When you cook something on a pan or on a grill/broiler the outside is exposed to a high temperature, giving the outside a chance to go through chemical changes like Maillard reactions ...


26

Ants don't care about artificial sweeteners. Make two piles: one of your mystery sweet stuff and one of real sugar (as a control to make sure there are ants around). Maybe moisten them some or make syrup. Leave them outside somewhere you see ants. Then check them later. Carbohydrates (sugar) are fuel for all animals. Stevia has no food value. Ants ...


25

Not meaning this as a snippy answer at all, but I would say: pumpkin. I would suggest substitute pumpkin bread and continue as normal. This one I have done before. It is a heavier French Toast (or eggy bread, pain perdu or many other names around the world), but turned out quite nice in my opinion. Another option would be a stuffed version with pumpkin ...


23

Many beginners in the kitchen get advice along the lines of “you can play around with cooking, but baking recipes shouldn’t be changed or you risk failure” or something similar. This is only partially true. Whenever you consider substitutions, you need to consider what the purpose of the given ingredient is. This will help in finding the answer to the “can ...


23

I agree with FuzzyChef's answer, though I'd emphasize in general that this is often a question as shape as well as volume. A cake that is increased in size but also baked in a wider pan so its overall thickness is about the same as the original may not need much additional cooking time at all, or the increase might be small. When one increases all ...


21

This answer is specific to OP's situation, and doesn't apply for the general case where "getting it wrong" has fewer consequences. is there any surefire way to tell if this is Stevia and not sugar? No, there is no surefire way you can tell. Within the bounds of an everyday kitchen, and lay-person knowledge; there is no method by which you will be 100% ...


21

I have never made these, but this is what I observe from comparing your recipe to the most readily found online ones: Your mix is dry. Other recipes tend to have up to twice as much liquid as yours, by proportion to the flour. Your mix has no egg. Every recipe I found included egg, in quantities ranging from 1 egg per 1 cup flour to 1 egg per 1/2 cup flour. ...


19

I think it's a bad idea... Crepes are made with a batter (as opposed to a dough) spread thin over a hot metal plate (seasoned or oiled). A baking stone has a porous surface and I suppose the batter would just get stuck to your stone. It doesn't happen with a dough because it has enough structure to not fill every pore of the stone on contact. On the other ...


19

By itself? Not really, the results will end up edible (i.e. fully cooked) but not very tasty (chewy, no searing/caramelization). However, there are dedicated "microwave grill" devices like the Microhearth Grill Pan (others might be better, google will help, this is just the one I have experience with) that you can put into your microwave oven. They convert ...


18

My cooking club, several years ago, obtained a worksheet from a commercial manufacturer of cake pans, which I've just republished (I can't name the company, but I can share the data). As you can see from the sheet, when making white cake, an increase in volume of 50% results in an increase in cooking time of about 5 minutes, provided that you are not ...


18

On a practical basis? 40 to 45 min. That is, bake it for 40 min and then check it to see if it's done (or otherwise check it 5 minutes earlier than you otherwise would). The difference between 350F and 375F in actual cooking is generally dwarfed by the temperature inaccuracy of home ovens.


17

No, don't do it. Good crepes are made within narrow parameters of heat exchange. You can observe this when making crepes on the stovetop - the first crepe is almost always bad. The pan seems to be either not hot enough, or too hot. After the first one, it somehow "stabilizes", or extra heat starts to creep on you. In the second case, it will get too hot ...


17

Some people say that it gives a lighter texture, while others say it gives a more rubbery/tougher texture (due to more gluten being developed). I would challenge the notion that these two aspects are necessarily opposed. Lighter doesn't necessarily mean "softer" or "more tender"; in cakes, it generally means "rising higher with more air." The way that ...


15

Thaw in refrigerator until soft enough to portion. Portion total batch, then re-freeze. Ideally, it should have been portioned before initial freeze. At this point, unless you want to bake them all, you will be fine with a refrigerated thaw, portion, and re-freeze. Store portioned, frozen, cookie dough with as little air in the container as possible.


15

Unlikely. Without even getting into the mechanics of how it would work, simple physics dictates that you can't get the temperature of this "immersion oven" above 100 degrees Celsius. Most cakes and breads are cooked at temperatures above 170 degrees Celsius. A second issue is that moisture can escape when baking in a normal oven. Your "immersion oven" would ...


14

Marble has a very slick surface, so flour will not stick to it as well as wood, a much more porous material. You need to dust the dough with flour instead of the pin, or use parchment paper between the pin and the dough. Marble pins conducts heat away from the dough quicker than wood, and work better when butter is incorporated into the dough (like puff ...


13

Yeasts are pretty much interchangeable but have different fermentation qualities. Most recipes will specify the kind and amount of yeast. Adding more yeast than called for makes bakes rise a little faster and taste yeastier, and this appears to be a regional preference in the US and in some other countries, so amounts called for in recipes will vary. ...


12

You can dip a knife in hot water between each slice you cut. The hot knife will make it easier to cut the dough, without thawing it. You can also do this with an ice cream scoop, but as dough is more dense than ice cream I doubt it will be efficient enough.


11

I have no idea how many cookies a 3# tub of dough would make, but I'm so curious! My best suggestion is to thaw out 1 tub, bake all of the cookies and freeze them after they have cooled. I freeze homemade cookies all the time! You can reach in and grab 1 or 2 to nibble on at a time. Most cookies almost seem better (to me) when they are frozen.


11

You don't have to use clingfilm (cling wrap, saran wrap depending where you are in the world), there are alternatives as long as the pastry is not sticky: Plastic bags: I reuse zippable plastic bags as many times as I can, you can wash them by turning them inside out Baking paper: baking paper can be re-used as long as it stays clean Aluminum foil: again ...


11

I would first check on the type of flour I am using. To produce breads, always use flour that contains the highest protein count. It is this protein that produces gluten, and the more of this protein the stronger the gluten. This can be called a multitude of things, from 'Strong Flour', to 'Baker's Flour', to 'Best For Bread'. Another thing you might want ...


11

Wow, do not throw it away, especially if you have a scale or yeast handy. There are 2 easy methods to determine whether the unknown sweetener is sugar or not. Try fermenting unknown sweetener with yeast With the exception of lactose, yeast can feed on all "real" sugars, or at least the ones you'd normally keep in your kitchen. On the other hand, in all of ...


11

A cake baking uneven to that degree makes me thing the heat source is really uneven. One side of the oven is hot, the other is much cooler. I've seen a fan oven cause some uneven baking before but never to that degree. Make sure your oven is pre-heated for at least 10 to 15 minutes before baking If you have fan oven and you have no non-fan mode try putting ...


11

Maybe not an answer. I'd try to collect as much NY Cheesecake recipes as possible and see what are the common parts and what variations there are between them. In one of your example, recipes I've looked at are quite liberal in what can be used as crust. For example, this recipe suggests "...graham cracker, digestive biscuits, or vanilla wafer crumbs..." ...


10

Then the explanation for the flour is that the water and flour interact to produce gluten that then gives the cake its structure. Your confusion is well-founded, because gluten is required to form the structure of cake is too strong of a premise. Gluten can be a primary contributor to the structure of a cake, as in a wacky cake, but it is not required. ...


10

So normally, stove top cooking never results in all around heat like in an oven but what if you were to submerge (underwater bath instead of just around the sides) a dish in simmering water and then cover it completely (to prevent water from getting in) until it's cooked? This sounds a lot like sous vide which is currently becoming commonplace after having ...


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